Author Topic: GRO Indexes - which to believe?  (Read 922 times)

Offline gazania

  • RootsChat Veteran
  • *****
  • Posts: 775
    • View Profile
Re: GRO Indexes - which to believe?
« Reply #9 on: Thursday 30 November 17 23:55 GMT (UK) »
Thank you for all your replies.  I agree with all opinions expressed.  Take nothing for granted in this game and be curious about the differences.  Gazania
ALDERMAN, Bucks
BELK, Yorkshire, London
CARLING, Bedfordshire
CUNDITH,CUNDILL, Yorkshire, PALIN. Lincolnshire
FOX, Essex; Camberwell Surrey
LANE, Cork IE;Askeaton LIM, Liverpool, Clifton, Bristol
VOLLER, Surrey
WALL Clonlara Co Clare Ireland
WAREHAM, Esher, Surrey; London
WINCH, Surrey

RootsChat is the busiest, largest free family history forum site in the country. It is completely free to use. Register now.
Also register instantly with Facebook or Twitter (and other social networks). Start your genealogy search now.


Offline a chesters

  • RootsChat Veteran
  • *****
  • Posts: 819
  • A C age about 8! Whats next?
    • View Profile
Re: GRO Indexes - which to believe?
« Reply #10 on: Friday 01 December 17 03:06 GMT (UK) »
If it is of interest, even now, names can be misspelt, even with ALL the correct information.

When I became naturalised in Australia, in 1984 ::) I supplied ALL the correct information, certified copy of original birth certificate, travel document provided by Australia House  in London, and other official documents, ALL with the correct spelling.

The original certificate had an additional letter inserted into the surname ::) and the second Christian names was misspelt. This I was not aware of at the time, only being interested in the surname. It was only when I applied for a passport that it was picked up, and the "officials" stated that their incorrect information was the only information which was acceptable :-X :-X even when supplied with the original documentation.

So, according to Australia, my name is different to what is on my birth certificate.

Wonder what mischief I could get up to, and get away with. ;D ;D

RootsChat is the busiest, largest free family history forum site in the country. It is completely free to use. Register now.
Also register instantly with Facebook or Twitter (and other social networks). Start your genealogy search now.


Offline JayNQ

  • RootsChat Extra
  • **
  • Posts: 28
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: GRO Indexes - which to believe?
« Reply #11 on: Friday 01 December 17 06:12 GMT (UK) »
As you supplied the documentation, we can't blame the accent for the misspelling.  ;D

Offline Andrew Tarr

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,024
  • Wanted: Charles Percy Liversidge
    • View Profile
Re: GRO Indexes - which to believe?
« Reply #12 on: Friday 01 December 17 09:48 GMT (UK) »
And as you get further back, as has been said, spelling of names was a lot more fluid. Often just depended on the way the person writing in would think to spell it. 

Exactly so.  An ancestor of mine was an Allwood, which occasionally appears as Alwood, not surprisingly.  But the name is from Somerset, and in the early 19th century also appeared as Allard, so we can now take a guess at how it may have been spoken.  It's not similar enough to be caught by many sounds-like searchers.
Tarr, Tydeman, Liversidge, Bartlett, Young

Offline Guy Etchells

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 3,536
    • View Profile
Re: GRO Indexes - which to believe?
« Reply #13 on: Friday 01 December 17 09:54 GMT (UK) »
Just to throw another spoke in the spelling/correct name wheel here in the UK a person's official name is the name he/she uses in everyday life.
That may be the name on his/her birth certificate or it may be a different name.

There is also only one way to change ones name in the UK and that is by using a different name, everything else is simply evidence that a change of name occurred.

Cheers
Guy
http://anguline.co.uk/Framland/index.htm   The site that gives you facts not promises!
http://burial-inscriptions.co.uk Tombstones & Monumental Inscriptions.

As we have gained from the past, we owe the future a debt, which we pay by sharing today.