Author Topic: Where would you find the grave  (Read 454 times)

Offline laurenbailey

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Where would you find the grave
« on: Wednesday 06 December 17 21:29 GMT (UK) »
Hi,

I'm going absolutely mad trying to find Thomas's grave!
I think I've found everything.. but the grave and it's really bugging me!!

I have attached Thomas Roberts burial image link,
Thomas was born in 1845, Water St Bangor.
Died 3rd May 1921 in Conwy and it was Edward Jones (Work House Master) who signed his death to say it was witnessed.

I know his little brother is buried in St Mary's, Conwy.. but where the hell is thomas  :(

It's driving me nuts!!!  :D

https://search.findmypast.co.uk/record?id=gbprs%2fwal%2f4394848%2f00650&parentid=gbprs%2fd%2f895046160%2f1

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Offline cemetery friends

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Re: Where would you find the grave
« Reply #1 on: Thursday 07 December 17 05:59 GMT (UK) »
The workhouse master probably had an arrangement to bury inmates in a cemetery in the locality of the workhouse in what was known as a pauper's grave. Such graves were not allowed to show the names of the deceased on a marker.
Avery [Wembury]
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Offline solidrock

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Re: Where would you find the grave
« Reply #2 on: Thursday 07 December 17 07:14 GMT (UK) »
There are lots of Thomas Roberts buried in Conwy but can't find one that died in 1921.

http://www.gravestonephotos.com

Offline laurenbailey

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Re: Where would you find the grave
« Reply #3 on: Friday 08 December 17 18:42 GMT (UK) »
The workhouse master probably had an arrangement to bury inmates in a cemetery in the locality of the workhouse in what was known as a pauper's grave. Such graves were not allowed to show the names of the deceased on a marker.

from the death certificate it states that the address is "12 waen terrace, Conwy, Caernarvonshire, Wales" and it sounds/looks like just a house? i can't believe there could be a possibility that he could have been buried with no mark or name :(

Offline laurenbailey

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Re: Where would you find the grave
« Reply #4 on: Friday 08 December 17 18:43 GMT (UK) »
There are lots of Thomas Roberts buried in Conwy but can't find one that died in 1921.

http://www.gravestonephotos.com

i've seen some thomas roberts buried too but not exact to the dates this one died! :(

Offline cemetery friends

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Re: Where would you find the grave
« Reply #5 on: Friday 08 December 17 19:55 GMT (UK) »
Workhouses were not identified as such on official documents such as death certificates but the street address was used to avoid a family being embarrassed by their circumstances, the same applied to a burial arranged by the workhouse. Sometimes the grave was marked with a wooden or brass marker with a serial number but often over the years these disappeared. I do not know if the address was a workhouse but in some cases a family would be paid an allowance to house a "half way" inmate. I think the fact the workhouse master was mentioned means there was a connection and by law the name of a deceased was not allowed on a grave marker.
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Offline Elwyn Soutter

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Re: Where would you find the grave
« Reply #6 on: Saturday 09 December 17 05:22 GMT (UK) »
In 1904, the Registrar General decided that where a child was born in the workhouse, there need no longer be any indication of this on the birth certificate. Instead, the place of birth could be recorded as an ordinary street address, either a real one or a pseudonymous one invented for the purpose. From around 1920, the same practice was later also adopted for the death certificates of those who died in the workhouse.

http://www.workhouses.org.uk/addresses/
Elwyn

Offline Guy Etchells

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Re: Where would you find the grave
« Reply #7 on: Saturday 09 December 17 07:09 GMT (UK) »
The workhouse master probably had an arrangement to bury inmates in a cemetery in the locality of the workhouse in what was known as a pauper's grave. Such graves were not allowed to show the names of the deceased on a marker.

from the death certificate it states that the address is "12 waen terrace, Conwy, Caernarvonshire, Wales" and it sounds/looks like just a house? i can't believe there could be a possibility that he could have been buried with no mark or name :(

What was know as a pauper grave was simply a common grave, that is a grave not purchased as a private grave in which unrelated people may be buried.

Most cemetery regulations forbid the use of headstones on these common graves as only a few of the people buried in such graves had relatives who could pay for an inscription on the headstone.

The cemeteries also used these common graves to advantage by locating them between purchased plots, this gave the appearance that the cemetery was more spacious (or less packed) than was really the case.

You need to look in the plot register to see who was buried where.
I would also suggest looking in Bangor; many workhouses in a Union still used the policy of returning the body of the deceased to their parish of origin even though the Union was by this time considered to be “one parish”

Cheers
Guy
http://anguline.co.uk/Framland/index.htm   The site that gives you facts not promises!
http://burial-inscriptions.co.uk Tombstones & Monumental Inscriptions.

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Offline BumbleB

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Re: Where would you find the grave
« Reply #8 on: Saturday 09 December 17 07:21 GMT (UK) »
laurenbailey - you say that the death certificate gives an address of 12 Waen Terrace, Conwy.  You also attached a link to the burial register, where Thomas Roberts is shown as having lived at 12 Waen Terrace.  Did you not also notice that of the 16 entries on those 2 pages of the burial register, 8 of them had the address of 12 Waen Terrace?

Transcriptions and NBI are merely finding aids.  They are NOT a substitute for original record entries.
Remember - "They'll be found when they want to be found" !!!
Archbell - anywhere, any date
Kendall - WRY
Milner - WRY
Appleyard - WRY