Author Topic: Deciphering abbreviation and a name in 1638 Scottish will  (Read 323 times)

Offline ksyw2x

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Deciphering abbreviation and a name in 1638 Scottish will
« on: Sunday 31 December 17 22:46 GMT (UK) »
This is the will of James Cuthbertson in Over Auchintiber
1. For debts owing out, I have Margaret Cuthbertsonne in Auchintiber, Thomas Cuthbertson in Fulwod, then Robert Stewart, John Stewart, Jonat Howie, Robert Nowxley, and John Cothrae in... where. Is that an abbreviation for "foresaid". And I am ready to stand corrected on the names.
2. In the Legacie, I have Jonet Darroche his spouse, and the four bairnes are Agnes, Marien, Helen, and ???. I should recognize that abbreviation but I can't recall it.
Thanks!

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Offline horselydown86

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Re: Deciphering abbreviation and a name in 1638 Scottish will
« Reply #1 on: Monday 01 January 18 04:07 GMT (UK) »
In the first image, the place name for the last four people owed looks to be fey.

It's clearer on the first three people.

Does that make sense?  I don't believe it's a contracted form of aforesaid.

Regarding the names, I see the second Robert's surname as ending:  -o-w-p-l-a-y

An x will curve to the right as in what I think is ex(ecutr)ix in the second image.

I would read the initial of that name as a W in an English document.  Can you find a W and N elsewhere to compare?

The last surname I see as Cochra(n)e.  The upwards flourish of the a indicates a contraction.

Regarding the second image, I'm sure we have discussed that superscript contraction at the end of the word on this board.

I just can't remember enough to find it again.

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Offline ksyw2x

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Re: Deciphering abbreviation and a name in 1638 Scottish will
« Reply #2 on: Monday 01 January 18 15:33 GMT (UK) »
Thanks. I thought that placename looked like "fey" but that is not a placename that I've seen before.

Cochrane makes perfect sense as the last surname. There were plenty of Cochranes in the area. As for the Wowplay name... the letters do look like Wowplay but I can't get that to sound like any names that would fit with the time and place. There is an N in the document that is close to the letter that I transcribed as N.

Katherine

Offline ksyw2x

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Re: Deciphering abbreviation and a name in 1638 Scottish will
« Reply #3 on: Monday 01 January 18 15:47 GMT (UK) »
Here is a section with an "N" in "Nothing". Also maybe an N further down, at the beginning of the last line, which I think reads "None" but I'm not sure.

I can tell you that transcribing old documents has sure made me more careful with my own handwriting!

Katherine

Offline GR2

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Re: Deciphering abbreviation and a name in 1638 Scottish will
« Reply #4 on: Monday 01 January 18 16:12 GMT (UK) »
The name looks a bit like Wellplay.

As to the "of fey", the first creditor is described as being "in" and the second as being "portioner of" (i.e. owner of part of a larger property). They are owed largish sums of money "conforme to ane/his band" - i.e. signed bonds. The remaining creditors are not described as being "in" or "of" and are owed fairly small sums. Therefore the most likely way of taking "of fey" is as a spelling of "of fee", i.e. wages. These will be servants/employees of the deceased who are owed wages.

Offline horselydown86

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Re: Deciphering abbreviation and a name in 1638 Scottish will
« Reply #5 on: Monday 01 January 18 16:20 GMT (UK) »
Having looked at the latest image, I'm almost certain that the name begins with W rather than N.

It's very difficult to tell w from double-l.  The formation of what I thought was the middle w is identical to that in Robert Stewart's surname.

I wonder if the missing child from Image 2 is as simple as elit = Elizabet/Elizabeth?


Offline ksyw2x

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Re: Deciphering abbreviation and a name in 1638 Scottish will
« Reply #6 on: Tuesday 02 January 18 15:03 GMT (UK) »
I found published transcriptions of court records from Ayrshire in the late 17th century and it included the names Wowplay and Warplay (possibly the same person) and also included fey, meaning fee.

Thanks for answering my questions and correcting my mistakes-

Katherine