Author Topic: 18th century writing puzzle  (Read 936 times)

Offline Jonosue

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18th century writing puzzle
« on: Tuesday 16 January 18 17:30 GMT (UK) »
Hello,
I have just downloaded the Testament Dative of my ancestor Andrew Ramsay. it is dated 1714, and although I have managed to decipher quite a lot of it, the three words I have circled elude me completely. They turn up several times, so I think I need to know. Can anyone help me, please?
Many thanks.
Hicks, Thorburn, Bennett, Millar, Parsons

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Offline isobelw

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Re: 18th century writing puzzle
« Reply #1 on: Tuesday 16 January 18 17:58 GMT (UK) »
I think the second one is umquhile which means former or previous or relating to a person now dead ( which may be the meaning in this context).
Isobel
Clotworthy, McMahon, Saunderson, Culley (Ireland & Scotland)
Weatherall, Greer (Ireland & Scotland)
Hamilton, Johnston, Dawson, Rennie, Wright (Clackmannanshire)

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Offline philipsearching

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Re: 18th century writing puzzle
« Reply #2 on: Tuesday 16 January 18 17:59 GMT (UK) »
The first one looks very like adobted.  Depending on the context this could be a variant of adopted or adoubted (which an unreliable online glossary suggests might mean accounted, settled, paid, repaid)

Philip
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Offline philipsearching

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Re: 18th century writing puzzle
« Reply #3 on: Tuesday 16 January 18 18:01 GMT (UK) »
I think the second one is umquhile which means former or previous or relating to a person now dead ( which may be the meaning in this context).
Isobel

Somewhere in the murkiest recesses of my memory lurks a link between erstwhile and umqwhile (but I can't remember where from!) so I'd go with umquhile if the context fits.
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Offline GR2

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Re: 18th century writing puzzle
« Reply #4 on: Tuesday 16 January 18 18:46 GMT (UK) »
adebted

umqll = umquhile = late, as in deceased

Jajviic & One thousand seven hundred and       Jaj = is a form of M = 1,000    vii c = 700 The month and the rest of the year are left blank as they didn't have that information at the time.

Offline Jonosue

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Re: 18th century writing puzzle
« Reply #5 on: Tuesday 16 January 18 19:18 GMT (UK) »
THank you very much. i think your translations will fit into the  context. I would never have deciphered the third word - your explanation has enlightened me, I (hope!) about several other obscure bits further on.
My problems are exacerbated by the fact that it looks as though there are two Andrew Ramsays, father (dead) and son (executor). And there is a mention of a John Law of Lauriston - not sure at the moment whether he was creditor or debtor. I looked him up: he was a Scottish banker who was responsible for first central bank in France - and also for the 'Mississippi Bubble, which was the French equivalent of the Southsea Bubble. I am hoping Andrew Ramsay did not lose a lot of money by investing in his bank!
Sue
Hicks, Thorburn, Bennett, Millar, Parsons

Offline goldie61

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Re: 18th century writing puzzle
« Reply #6 on: Tuesday 16 January 18 20:23 GMT (UK) »
This is a great site for all those strange particularly Scottish words you come across in wills and sasines.
http://www.dsl.ac.uk/
Dictionary of the Scottish Language - website hosted by the University of Glasgow.
Very helpful.
Lane, Burgess: Cheshire. Finney, Rogers, Gilman:Derbys
Cochran, Nicol, Paton, Bruce:Scotland. Bertolle:London
Bainbridge, Christman, Jeffs: Staffs

Offline Jonosue

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Re: 18th century writing puzzle
« Reply #7 on: Wednesday 17 January 18 17:02 GMT (UK) »
Hi again,
Thanksto your help I have managed to decipher the majority of the testament, but I ham still having trouble with the numbers. May I ask for a bit more help with the figures in the photos, please?
It seems that john law had lent Andrew Ramsay Sr 60,000 Scots money, which seems a huge amount. I am glad I didn't inherit that debt! One wonders what he had been planning to do with it.
Sue
Hicks, Thorburn, Bennett, Millar, Parsons

Offline GR2

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Re: 18th century writing puzzle
« Reply #8 on: Wednesday 17 January 18 17:45 GMT (UK) »
Liiij Lb   = 54

xij Lb  = 12

1 Lb x s  = 1 10/-

Remember that the pound Scots was worth 1/8d Sterling at that time, so 60,000 Scots = 5,000 Sterling.

The pound Scots was abolished in 1707, but throughout the 18th century it continued to be used in accounting here.