Author Topic: Cotton Industry of Greater Manchester - Migrants from the South  (Read 2124 times)

Offline RuslanPashayev

  • RootsChat Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 207
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Cotton Industry of Greater Manchester - Migrants from the South
« on: Saturday 20 January 18 17:17 GMT (UK) »
Dear Friends,
during Middle Ages cotton industry in Salford and Blackburn Hundreds was growing rapidly. Lancashire mill owners used to send recruiting teams to other counties in the South of England Somerset, Berkshire Devon etc. because there was a shortage of labor locally.  And the oppressed laborers from the South moved to Lancashire as to a new world. Bolton, Blackburn, Oldham, Burnley, Ashton, Wigan, and other South East Lancashire towns grew quickly. At first cotton manufacture was a small home-based business. The South East Lancashire area became the powerhouse of industrial activity  in England in the period 1780 to 1820 when the Industrial Revolution took hold, with inventions such as the  weaving loom changed the textile work from a domestic industry to factory-based one. I would highly appreciate any info on the migration of laborers from the South to Lancashire.  My main concern is when (years) immigration reached it's peak and where (locations) in Lancashire the South settlers established their new homes. Any statistics would be appreciated. Thanks in advance. Kind regards, R

RootsChat is the busiest, largest free family history forum site in the country. It is completely free to use. Register now.
Also register instantly with Facebook or Twitter (and other social networks). Start your genealogy search now.


Offline chempat

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 4,815
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Cotton Industry of Greater Manchester - Migrants from the South
« Reply #1 on: Saturday 20 January 18 17:33 GMT (UK) »
Suggest you do a google search if you want statistics, as that is what most of us would do.

RootsChat is the busiest, largest free family history forum site in the country. It is completely free to use. Register now.
Also register instantly with Facebook or Twitter (and other social networks). Start your genealogy search now.


Online Maiden Stone

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,303
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Cotton Industry of Greater Manchester - Migrants from the South
« Reply #2 on: Sunday 21 January 18 02:18 GMT (UK) »
Dear Friends,
during Middle Ages cotton industry in Salford and Blackburn Hundreds was growing rapidly. Lancashire mill owners used to send recruiting teams to other counties in the South of England Somerset, Berkshire Devon etc. because there was a shortage of labor locally. 
What do you mean by "Middle Ages"? That would be generally understood to be pre 1500. Before cotton mills.

Offline RuslanPashayev

  • RootsChat Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 207
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Cotton Industry of Greater Manchester - Migrants from the South
« Reply #3 on: Sunday 21 January 18 02:46 GMT (UK) »
looks like in the 1500's it was still home operated business. some say it was Flemish who introduced textile industry in Lancashire, I am not sure about that, and even if there was some influence, it would have happened sooner or later. They had Wool Fairs here and there in the 1500's.and there was not that much cotton. main focus was still on wool  - which comes from sheep. Cotton came later when they started getting raw cotton from the colonies. I think late 1600's early 1700's. and then it turned into industry which became emblematic of the region. I am assuming the peak of immigration from the South was during that last phase mid 1700's.

Online Maiden Stone

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,303
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Cotton Industry of Greater Manchester - Migrants from the South
« Reply #4 on: Sunday 21 January 18 06:01 GMT (UK) »
Re reply #3. That's why I was confused when you began your original post "during Middle Ages" then next sentence began with "Lancashire mill owners" which is a leap to a different era.
The topic of "Textile Industry in Lancashire from Middle Ages to Nineteenth Century" is a large and complex one. There are plenty of books about it, general and specific, as well as information online. A search of catalogues of Manchester Working-class Library ( now called something else), Harris Library & Museum, Preston, Bolton Library & Museum and others may be of interest. Your enquiry can't be answered in a few words.
England owed its' prosperity to wool. That's why the Woolsack is in Parliament.
Flemish weavers went to Bolton.
Cotton mills attracted people from surrounding areas. Some millowners brought poor and orphaned children from workhouses as apprentices. Women, even married women, worked in Lancashire cotton mills.
There were booms and slumps. A prolonged slump after end of war with France 1815 resulting in unemployment and wage cuts. Mass Irish immigration provided a large pool of workers from mid 19th century. Some of these may have had experience of linen weaving in Ireland.
Lancashire County Council closed/mothballed/curtailed some of its' museums devoted to the cotton industry.
 

Offline mowsehowse

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,062
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Cotton Industry of Greater Manchester - Migrants from the South
« Reply #5 on: Sunday 21 January 18 10:19 GMT (UK) »
QUOTE from OP: "My main concern is when (years) immigration reached it's peak and where (locations) in Lancashire the South settlers established their new homes."

Perhaps one way of gathering statistics would be to make detailed searches of the 1851 census to get area of birth.

Some places have earlier population records, [I know York does,] so I imagine it be worth putting your question to the records office.
Rowse in Brixham, Tenby, Hull & Ramsgate. Strongman, in Falmouth. Champion. Coke. Eame/s. Gibbons. Passmore. Pulsever. Sparkes in Brixham & Ramsgate. Toms in Cornwall. Waymoth. Wyatt.

Offline alpinecottage

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,013
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Cotton Industry of Greater Manchester - Migrants from the South
« Reply #6 on: Sunday 21 January 18 10:56 GMT (UK) »
An anecdotal story about the movement of my ancestors in the cotton trade moving from Kidderminster to Manchester;
Samuel Hogg was born (1758), married, widowed, remarried in Kidderminster and his daughter was christened there in 1790.
I next catch sight of the family in Manchester, when another daughter was christened there in 1797.
I think these dates coincide with the demise/downturn of carpet weaving in Kidderminster at the end of the 18th century and the rise of the cotton industry in Manchester at the same time.  The family prospered in Manchester until about 1840, after which there was a huge influx of cheap Irish labour.  Three of Samuel's grandsons emigrated as Bounty Immigrants to Australia, one became a joiner and another a solicitor, while the grandson who stayed in the Mcr cotton trade lived in poor housing and died young (aged 38). 
Perrins - Manchester and Staffs
Honan - Manchester and Ireland
Hogg - Manchester 19 cent
Anderson - Newcastle mid 19 cent
Boullen - London then Carlisle then Manchester
Comer - Manchester and Galway

Online Maiden Stone

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,303
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Cotton Industry of Greater Manchester - Migrants from the South
« Reply #7 on: Sunday 21 January 18 13:43 GMT (UK) »
QUOTE from OP: "My main concern is when (years) immigration reached it's peak and where (locations) in Lancashire the South settlers established their new homes."

Perhaps one way of gathering statistics would be to make detailed searches of the 1851 census to get area of birth.

Some places have earlier population records, [I know York does,] so I imagine it be worth putting your question to the records office.

Information about 1801, 1811, 1821 & 1831 Censi can be found here:
www.1911census.org.uk/1801.htm
www.1911census.org.uk/1811.htm
www.1911census.org.uk/1821.htm
www.1911census.org.uk/1831.htm

1801 Census: Records exist detailing individuals in Edgworth (near Bolton). Areas in Lancashire where records are known to exist detailing households are Bury and Liverpool.
1811 Census: Areas in Lancashire where records are known to exist detailing households are Great Bolton, Whalley and Wigan.
1821 Census of Eccleston, near Chorley is on Lancashire Online Parish Clerks website.
1831 Census: This census attempted to obtain detailed information about occupations of men over age of 20. Areas in Lancashire where records are known to exist detailing households are Great Bolton and Whalley.

See also:
Abstract of Population 1821 (for Lancashire, parts) Contains some info about growth of cotton manufacturing in specific places.
www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/LAN/1821census

Research Tools no. 2: Census Schedules and Listings 1801-1831: An Introductory Guide  by Richard Wall, Matthew Woolard & Betrice Moring, University of Essex, Department of History
pdf of book:
https://www1.essex.ac.uk/history/documents/research/RT2_wall_2012.pdf

See the website A Vision of Britain Through Time. You can look up places. It has information about 1801-1831 census.
www.visionofbritain.org.uk

BTW Blackburn and Burnley are not in Greater Manchester. I know it covers a large area but it hasn't reached that far north and swallowed up those 2 towns, yet.



Offline RuslanPashayev

  • RootsChat Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 207
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Cotton Industry of Greater Manchester - Migrants from the South
« Reply #8 on: Sunday 21 January 18 13:53 GMT (UK) »
Dear Friends,
thanks so much for sharing all those details, my deepest sincere appreciation.
Kidderminster wow, it Worcestershire. Thats what I thought when they changed "Act of Settlement" which regulated migration to the cotton areas...people from the South flooded the areas. That was already capitalism. Not a small businesses. I read couple of good books, they were available online at google books...
And yes Flemish in Bolton, I think those were Continental Prostestants, Huguenots right, who came to England because of religious persecutions in Spanish Netherlands, its 1500 right??? They were in Halifax, West Riding of Yorkshire as well. I am not quite sure where else they settled in Lancashire...they say the last name Fleming...comes from "Flemish". I am not sure if its just a tradition or actual truth though.Yeah sack of wool in the House of Parliament. I recall the Victor Hugo's Man Who Laughs description of the customs of the House of Lords...amazing story by the way. Thanks so much again to everyone, input is very much appreciated. Kind regards, R