Author Topic: Cotton Industry of Greater Manchester - Migrants from the South  (Read 1923 times)

Offline ThrelfallYorky

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Re: Cotton Industry of Greater Manchester - Migrants from the South
« Reply #36 on: Saturday 27 January 18 16:20 GMT (UK) »
Rather puzzled by the " hahahahah...s"?
That was a serious question on my part, intended to assist with defining what information would actually be helpful to find for you, by clarifying what you were actually interested in researching.
Threlfall (Southport), Isherwood (lancs & Canada), Newbould + Topliss(Derby), Keating & Cummins (Ireland + lancs), Fisher, Strong& Casson (all Cumberland) & Downie & Bowie, Linlithgow area Scotland . Also interested in Leigh& Burrows,(Lancashire) Griffiths (Shropshire & lancs), Leaver (Lancs/Yorks) & Anderson(Cumberland and very elusive)

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Offline Blue70

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Re: Cotton Industry of Greater Manchester - Migrants from the South
« Reply #37 on: Saturday 27 January 18 16:45 GMT (UK) »
Going back to the first post on this thread and the interest in migration it's only by looking at the 1851 census and after that you will be able to get an idea of migration information by looking at places of birth. The 1841 census can be used but the detail is more vague such as whether born in county or not, born in Ireland etc.

Migration levels and patterns prior to 1841 are difficult to determine. Movement was mostly internal, migration not immigration, including movement of Welsh, Scots and Irish. Pre-1841 you are getting into anecdotal information territory where one person came from this place and some writer made this comment etc.


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Online KGarrad

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Re: Cotton Industry of Greater Manchester - Migrants from the South
« Reply #38 on: Saturday 27 January 18 16:51 GMT (UK) »
Ruslan, Flemings are Flemish, not Dutch,they speak a form of Dutch but there are  differences.

The Flemish people (from Vlanders in Belgium) insist they speak Dutch ;D
The Dutch reckon they speak Flemish! ;D

Belgian/Flemish TV programs, when shown in The Netherlands, are usually subtitled ::)

That's as was told to me by Dutch friends during the time I lived in NL.
Garrad (Suffolk, Essex, Somerset), Crocker (Somerset), Vanstone (Devon, Jersey), Sims (Wiltshire), Bridger (Kent)

Offline Viktoria

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Re: Cotton Industry of Greater Manchester - Migrants from the South
« Reply #39 on: Saturday 27 January 18 17:24 GMT (UK) »
The various Belgian provinces have great variations in the form of Flemish they speak.
It is not only on Dutch programmes shown on Belgian T.V that subtitles are necessary,someone from Oost  Vlanderen will have difficulty understanding someone from West Vlanderen.That is between Gent and Ypres.
As I said, Flemish was "trapped " in a time warp,having been a forbidden language for many years when technical terms were entering the language.
To go for so long without any printed material had a very limiting effect on what had been a living language.
It is over forty years since we lived in East Flanders near Gent and the influence of Dutch language programmes on the television has most probably had a very modernising effect on Flemish.
I do however find it a pity that everyday words which echo Old English
should be lost.
A Fleming will always try to help and will speak French if necessary whilst as Walloon will refuse to admit they can speak Flemish despite it being taught in schools.
Flemings talk to one another in their local dialect but will use ABN,the formal form of. Dutch for business etc. They also have good English.
Dutch altered and progressed but Flemish stood still,due to no fault of Flemish speakers.
Imagine being forbidden to speak your mother tongue.
T he same thing happened to Scots and Irish Gaelic .England forbade them.
But that is another matter.
                                        Viktoria.








Offline Maiden Stone

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Re: Cotton Industry of Greater Manchester - Migrants from the South
« Reply #40 on: Thursday 01 February 18 20:06 GMT (UK) »
Just came across this old book so thought I'd post it here as Bolton featured in this thread.
Bibliographia Boltoniensis - Being a Bibliography With Biographical Details of Bolton Authors and the Books Written by Them from 1550 to 1912; Books about Bolton and Those Printed & Published in the Town From 1785 to Date
Author Archibald Sparke

Offline Viktoria

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Re: Cotton Industry of Greater Manchester - Migrants from the South
« Reply #41 on: Thursday 01 February 18 21:45 GMT (UK) »
A lovely programme on last night about Edward The Black Prince.
His Jupon ,which up until fairly recent times hung over his tomb in Canterbury Cathedral was copied. It would be worn over his armour and offered some protection and also so he could be seen and followed by his troops.It was in red and blue velvet embroidered with the coat of arms of England. Magnificent.
Of interest was the stuffing in the quilted channels, it was raw cotton.
He died in 1376 so cotton was here then of course.
I would not have guessed so early.
                                                    Viktoria.