Author Topic: Recording baptisms in the 1600s  (Read 577 times)

Offline Westy11

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Recording baptisms in the 1600s
« on: Sunday 21 January 18 07:10 GMT (UK) »
I am unable to locate my document where I recorded the process for recording dates for baptisms during the previous calendar.

For example; Ann EVERITT was baptised at Welby Lincolnshire on 22 May 1682.

Suggestions for recording the date of baptism appropriately please.

Westy

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Offline stanmapstone

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Re: Recording baptisms in the 1600s
« Reply #1 on: Sunday 21 January 18 08:35 GMT (UK) »
Between approx 1200 and 1752 the year started on 25th March, from 1752 every year started on 1st January. So 22 May was 1682.

Stan
Mapstone, Mapston.
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Online Guy Etchells

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Re: Recording baptisms in the 1600s
« Reply #2 on: Sunday 21 January 18 08:41 GMT (UK) »
I am not sure what you are asking, are you refering to double dating due to the change of calendar in England in 1752 (Scotland had already adopted the change).
If so the double dating system (using the old year and the new year) is only used for dates in the months January, February & March and the new year started 1st January 1753 instead of the 25th of March.

Cheers
Guy
PS I should add that 1752 was the first year to use the supputation of the Year (changing the date of the start of the year from March to Jan. 1st).
Scotland had changed the first day of the year to 1 January in 1600.
It may also interest some that the City of London refused to adopt the change which is why the financial year starts on 5th April
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Offline Westy11

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Re: Recording baptisms in the 1600s
« Reply #3 on: Sunday 21 January 18 11:55 GMT (UK) »
Thanks so much for the responses Guy and Stan.  I admit to being very rushed when I posted and I did not explain myself well. I had a process in the background running on my computer to update the drivers and that caused a few hick ups. ::)

Anyway what I was looking for was the rules around determining a date on the Gregorian Calendar when the original date was documented under the Julian Calendar.

I had documented the 'rules' for want of a better term and used them with my Quaker ancestors.

Thanks a million for your replies. :)

Westy

Online Pheno

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Re: Recording baptisms in the 1600s
« Reply #4 on: Sunday 21 January 18 12:17 GMT (UK) »
Interesting Guy about the financial year.  Presumably the difference between 25 March and 5th April is the 12 'lost' days when the calendar changed.

Pheno
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Offline stanmapstone

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Re: Recording baptisms in the 1600s
« Reply #5 on: Sunday 21 January 18 14:09 GMT (UK) »
Interesting Guy about the financial year.  Presumably the difference between 25 March and 5th April is the 12 'lost' days when the calendar changed.

Pheno

There were 11 days missing between 2nd Day of September, and the 14th Day of September, 1752, 3rd-13th. In order to ensure against losing revenue it was decided by the British Treasury that the tax year which started on March 25 1752 would be of the usual length (365 days) and therefore it would end on April 4, the following tax year beginning on April 5. Unfortunately 1800 was not a leap year in the new Gregorian calendar but would have been in the old Julian system. Thus the treasury moved the start of the UK tax year from the April 5 to the April 6 and it has remained there ever since! Therefore  For personal tax purposes the fiscal year starts on 6 April and ends on 5 April of the next calendar year.

Stan
Mapstone, Mapston.
Census Information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk