Author Topic: Broomfield and Brownfield related  (Read 623 times)

Offline Brent.Brownfield

  • RootsChat Extra
  • **
  • Posts: 4
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Broomfield and Brownfield related
« on: Tuesday 23 January 18 17:25 GMT (UK) »
I see in the Brownfield family history where the name was spelled Brownfield, Broomfield, Brounfield, Brumfield and other variations, and at times with the i and e switched in field.  I wonder if my line of the Brownfield family and the line of the Broomfield family in Berwickshire are related.

My line of the Brownfield family were Scotch Presbyterians that migrated to Ulster and then to Pennsylvania in the early 1700s.  I believe I have tracked them back to Berwickshire in the 1500s, 1600s and 1700s.  But the Brownfield name appears to stop in Scotland altogether in the early 1700s.   I see one case in America where one of my ancestors was referred to as Broomfield, and he is one of the family members that migrated to Pennsylvania.  I wonder if the family in America started using Brownfield as a standard, and the family in Scotland started using Broomfield as the standard.

I have taken two Y DNA tests with results documented on ancestry.com and myFTDNA.com.  The results definitely place my family in Scotland.  I was surprised to find we also have several exact matches in Norway.  Is there a descendant of the Broomfield family from Berwickshire that has, or is willing to, add your DNA results to ancestry.com or myFTDNA.com?  This would allow us to see if the two families are related.   

RootsChat is the busiest, largest free family history forum site in the country. It is completely free to use. Register now.
Also register instantly with Facebook or Twitter (and other social networks). Start your genealogy search now.


Offline terianne

  • RootsChat Senior
  • ****
  • Posts: 416
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Broomfield and Brownfield related
« Reply #1 on: Wednesday 24 January 18 22:19 GMT (UK) »
Probably - remember in the past names where spelt the way it they often sounded and local dialects can change pronunciation then spelling

RootsChat is the busiest, largest free family history forum site in the country. It is completely free to use. Register now.
Also register instantly with Facebook or Twitter (and other social networks). Start your genealogy search now.


Offline Brent.Brownfield

  • RootsChat Extra
  • **
  • Posts: 4
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Broomfield and Brownfield related
« Reply #2 on: Wednesday 24 January 18 22:43 GMT (UK) »
Thanks Terianne, I had not considered the different dialects impacting the sound of the name and thus the different spellings.  Do you think the Scottish East and Middle Marches had different dialects, or even different dialects within a March?

Offline terianne

  • RootsChat Senior
  • ****
  • Posts: 416
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Broomfield and Brownfield related
« Reply #3 on: Monday 29 January 18 13:32 GMT (UK) »
the Scottish Borders dialect changes slightly between town and villages throughout the area, for instance Hawick and Galashiels are only 18 miles apart, but in some cases you would think there are speaking two languages, and although Hawick dialect can be the extreme and  if the person writing the documents is not from the area you will find differences, usually with the vowels in the spelling, but if the person doesn't understand the dialect you get wider difference  for Instance Broomfield can become Broonfield, which in turn could become Brownfield , because Brown is pronounced Broon  in the local dialects.

So, it could be that Broomfield & Brownfield are related.

NB: The Scottish Borders dialects are linked to old Scots and the tone of the local dialects can effect the spelling too. and just by hearing  someone speak in the local area, some can tell which part of the Borders the person is originally from
 

Offline Brent.Brownfield

  • RootsChat Extra
  • **
  • Posts: 4
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Broomfield and Brownfield related
« Reply #4 on: Monday 29 January 18 16:49 GMT (UK) »
Thanks again Terianne,

Your insights are fantastic!  Thank you so much for the replies.

I am now 95% convinced the Brownfield, Brounfield and Broomfield families from Berwickshire are the same family.  DNA tests would be nice to get me to 100%.

I have been doing searches that combine the multiple spellings of the Broomfield/Brownfield name with places where they lived in Berwickshire.  I find what is clearly the same person in more than one document, but with their surname spelled differently.  I can see why whoever created the 1928 index to the sasines decided to group these families together in the Berwickshire Index.

Thanks again for your help.

Offline Sunlaws

  • RootsChat Veteran
  • *****
  • Posts: 629
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Broomfield and Brownfield related
« Reply #5 on: Tuesday 30 January 18 11:49 GMT (UK) »
I have just come across another reference to the Broomfield/Brownfield family in Berwickshire.
From the 'Household Book of Lady Grisell Baillie'. Grace Broomfield is obviously selling ale, as on 24th September 1707, Lady Grisell spends £3 (Scots) 'For ale to Grace Brunfild at Greenlaw'.

Regards,
Lesley
Bradley, Gledhill, Dodson, Norcliffe, Kaye, Matthewman- all Berry Brow/Almondbury
Webster- Northowram
Brick wall: Maria Blaymires† c 1800 Northowram

Offline Brent.Brownfield

  • RootsChat Extra
  • **
  • Posts: 4
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Broomfield and Brownfield related
« Reply #6 on: Tuesday 30 January 18 14:42 GMT (UK) »
Thanks for sharing...I just looked at the book and see where Lady Grisell also hired an "Alison Brunfield" in 1713 to be a Chamber Maid.  "Her wage with shoes in the year was £1 14s".  I see another servant on the same page included shoes in her pay.  I wonder if shoes meant they provided a uniform and considered that part of the pay.

Offline Sunlaws

  • RootsChat Veteran
  • *****
  • Posts: 629
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Broomfield and Brownfield related
« Reply #7 on: Tuesday 30 January 18 14:55 GMT (UK) »
Hi

(I meant to post on the other Broomfield thread which is running, but glad it's of interest on this one!)

Yes, when servants were hired, it was usual to agree the yearly wages. It was assumed that board and lodging were provided, and other 'perks' such as provision of shoes or clothes was noted. Female servants were almost always provided with shoes, but not clothing, male servants with jackets and breeches, but often 'without linen', i.e. not shirts, drawers, neckwear etc.
regards,
Lesley
Bradley, Gledhill, Dodson, Norcliffe, Kaye, Matthewman- all Berry Brow/Almondbury
Webster- Northowram
Brick wall: Maria Blaymires† c 1800 Northowram