Author Topic: Would you still be alive ?  (Read 3166 times)

Offline louisa maud

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Re: Would you still be alive ?
« Reply #18 on: Tuesday 30 January 18 19:17 GMT (UK) »
We have a lot to be thankful for

Louisa Maud
Census information is Crown Copyright,
from  www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Garner, Marylebone Paddington  Northolt Ilford
Garner, Devon
Garner New Zealand
Maddieson
Parkinson St Pancras,
Lethbridge Paddington Slough
Jenkins Marylebone Paddington
Mizon/Mison/Myson Paddington
Tindal Marylebone Paddington
Tocock, (name changed to Ellis) London
Southam Marylebone, Paddington
Bragg Lambeth 1800's
Edermaniger(Maniger) Essex Kent Canada (Toronto)
Coveney Kent Lambeth
Sondes

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Online Jebber

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Re: Would you still be alive ?
« Reply #19 on: Tuesday 30 January 18 19:25 GMT (UK) »
If double Pneumonia  at aged four didn't kill me, or Polio at five, both before the benefit of the  NHS. I certainly would not have survived a ruptured ectopic pregnancy at 37. Even with modern medical intervention my husband was told I had no hope of survival and to say goodbye, trust my stubbornness to prove them wrong.

We sometimes forget how fortunate we are today :)

Jebber
CHOULES All ,  COKER Harwich Essex & Rochester Kent 
COLE Gt. Oakley, & Lt. Oakley, Essex.
DUNCAN Kent
EVERITT Colchester,† Dovercourt & Harwich Essex
GULLIVER/GULLOFER Fifehead Magdalen Dorset
HORSCROFT Kent.
KING Sturminster Newton, Dorset. MONK Odiham Ham.
SCOTT Wrabness, Essex
WILKINS Stour Provost, Dorset.
WICKHAM All in North Essex.
WICKHAM Medway Towns, Kent from 1880
WICKHAM, Ipswich, Suffolk.

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Offline Viktoria

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Re: Would you still be alive ?
« Reply #20 on: Tuesday 30 January 18 21:42 GMT (UK) »
I would not be-an undiagnosed heart attack which the Dr said was indigestion and a chest infection went for four days with me feeling worse and worse ( well you would wouldn`t you).
Fortunately a leaflet about swine flu came ih the post, I had a good many of the symptoms so phone the helpline.They said I needed a chest XRay ASAP.
Ambulance arrived and in to A&E;I had had "A significant heart event"----
Lots of damage so no by-pass or stent possible,BUT I am not too bad at all . I had such wonderful treatment and aftercare   and I am most grateful.
I can compare my treatment  with what my Mum had in 1957. Nothing really. At home and a few pills.She deteriorated and I insisted she went to hospital when the Dr called after about four days.
She died the next day aged 61.She had Rheumatic fever as a child and that damages the heart.
We moan about the N.H but those of us old enough to remember when you had to pay the Dr, and for any medication and if you hadn`t the money - it   was grandma`s remedies, so we are very appreciative of the N.H.S .
I can tell you if you had sore throats as often as I did and the remedy was  grand dad`s sweaty 
socks wrapped round your neck----!
Viktoria.

Offline brigidmac

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Re: Would you still be alive ?
« Reply #21 on: Tuesday 30 January 18 22:22 GMT (UK) »
Great thread ...I would have died in a stupid accident aged 19 if french para medics hadnt got to hospital on time .
Mind you 100 years ago maybe i wouldn't have attempted  my daring exploit.
Luckily my health insurance covered cost of intensive care and 3 weel stay otherwise parents would have had to  mortgage the house.
Roberts,Fellman.Macdermid MCDERMID McDiarmid Gardner Jones ,Bloch,Irvine,Hallis Stevenson ,McKay

Offline LizzieW

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Re: Would you still be alive ?
« Reply #22 on: Tuesday 30 January 18 23:03 GMT (UK) »
Then again, despite no NHS, poor sanitary conditions and poor lifestyles I still had quite a few ancestors who lived into their late 80s.

Offline jaybelnz

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Re: Would you still be alive ?
« Reply #23 on: Tuesday 30 January 18 23:11 GMT (UK) »
After spending many years researching my ancestors I am sad to say I am very used to a death of a young one,others around me who know nothing of their family history are always shocked

I always say have a look at your own history and would you be alive if born 100 or 200 years ago ?

I would of died when having my 1st child aged 27 and my son would of also not lived having developed pre-eclampsia in birth
Had I not of died then, I would of died in my 2nd pregnancy aged 35 as I developed type 1 diabetes at 8 wks
All of that is without the illnesses and broken arm doing childhood
Thank God for the medicine and treatments of today

So would you of had a early death had you lived in the past ?

Yep, I wouldn't be here today!  When I was born, I was haemorrhaging badly, as was my Mum. If it wasn't for my Dad, who provided his blood for transfusions to both my Mum and myself thanks to these two men - "Highlights of Transfusion Medicine History. 1628 English physician William Harvey discovers the circulation of blood. ... 1818 James Blundell, a British obstetrician, performs the first successful transfusion of human blood to a patient for the treatment of postpartum haemorrhage.

Also,  a friend of my grandparents, Walter Nash, who was at the time (1945), the Minister of Finance in our Goverment!  Vitamin K, the blood coagulant, was still currently only experimental and was still being researched and not yet passed for use, but he was able to get permission for it to be used on my Mum and myself to save both of us! We were the first people in NZ to get this vital product by transfusion. This man went on to be Prime Minister in the Labour Goverment!  (I'm guessing that's why my family were staunch Labour Party supporters  ;D ;D). So here I am, 72 years on, alive and well!!    I understand that Vitamin K is now given to all new born babies in NZ! 
"We analyse the evidence to draw a conclusion. The better the sources and information, the stronger the evidence, which leads to a reliable conclusion!" Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk.

MATHEWS, Ireland, England, USA & Canada, NZ
FLEMING,   Ireland
DUNNELL,  England
PAULSON,  England
DOUGLAS, Scotland, Ireland, NZ
WALKER,   Scotland
WATSON,  England, Ayrshire, Scotland, NZ
McAUGHTRIE, Ayrshire, Scotland, NZ
MASON,     Scotland, England, NZ
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Online cristeen

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Re: Would you still be alive ?
« Reply #24 on: Wednesday 31 January 18 00:25 GMT (UK) »
I have been very lucky to have had no major illnesses or accidents during my life so far. I was admitted to hospital with severe chest pains about two years ago & the paramedic expressed surprise that I hadn't visited my GP for the last 3 years and was on no regular medication at my age (I'm only in my early fifties!) Both my children were born quickly, with no pain relief or complications, although I was kept in with a suspected part retained placenta after my daughter's birth; according to the nurses everyone who was anyone had taken a look at my unusually small placenta :) My grandfather recovered from rheumatic fever in the early thirties and survived thirteen heart attacks in later life, sadly the fourteenth eventually finished him. I do seem to have come from a stock of folk who lived very long and active lives on both sides, as does my husband. I do hope that whatever brings my end it is swift and not burdensome to my relatives :)
Newson, Steavenson, Walker, Taylor, Dobson, Gardner, Clark, Wilson, Smith, Crossland, Goldfinch, Burnett, Hebdon, Peers, Strother, Askew, Bower, Beckwith, Patton, White, Turner, Nelson, Gilpin, Tomlinson, Thompson, Spedding, Wilkes, Carr, Butterfield, Ormandy, Wilkinson, Cocking, Glover, Pennington, Bowker, Kitching, Langhorn, Haworth, Kirkham.

Offline Nanna52

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Re: Would you still be alive ?
« Reply #25 on: Wednesday 31 January 18 00:47 GMT (UK) »
In a word.  No.
I have survived thyroid cancer and had radiation therapy for that.  I have AF and have had a pacemaker for more than ten years.  My grandmother died in 1933 with AF and dropsy.  Both controlled now with medication or pacemaker.  She was also asthmatic, now also controlled.  Grandfather died in 1918 from TB.
James -Victoria, Australia originally from Keynsham, Somerset.
Heale/Hale - Keynsham, Somerset
Vincent - Illogan/Redruth, Cornwall.  Moved to Sculcoates, Yorkshire; Grass Valley, California; Timaru, New Zealand and Victoria, Australia.
Williams somewhere in Wales - he kept moving
Ellis - Anglesey

Gedmatch A327531

Offline Janelle

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Re: Would you still be alive ?
« Reply #26 on: Wednesday 31 January 18 01:27 GMT (UK) »
Transcribing burial registers reinforces human mortality as well as tenacity.
I think it is nice seeing  children given the name of a deceased sibling because it honours that child and the earlier generation namesake.

What I noticed with my financially secure rural leaseholder folks was that most survived into old age so they must have missed the accidents doing farm work and blacksmithing and milling and weaving. They must have had healthy food and clean living.

But if women become widows early and the children lose the connection to the land because they donít get to keep their fatherís prosperity, that is often when lives are cut short- poverty, workplace accidents and disease. My impoverished 1850ís city dewellers died younger than their grandparents on the farm 100 years before.

I grew up on a farm -
Pigs and cows can pass diseases to dairy workers, killers
stepped on rusty metal and got blood poisoning, a killer
Measles, mumps, killers

Goodhind Coleman Wes(t)cott Taylor Tuck Sa(u)nders Warren How(e) Sminney Radford Frost Frank(e) Pool(e) Se(a)rle Moore Quick Veysey Ware Stoat(e) Kerslake Channon Drake Melhuish Hodge(s) in Devon;
Warren Baker Carpenter Crocombe Slocombe Greenslade Edbrooke Houndel Webber Tidball Sully Tout Veysey Wheddon in Somerset;
Bla(y)ney Johnston Crozier Moore Fleming Moffitt in Fermanagh and possibly Moffitt in Tyrone; Killen Chapman in Down; Dwyer Enright in Limerick; Linehan Murphy Driscoll in Cork