Author Topic: Latin - start of new year COMPLETED  (Read 213 times)

Offline grantleydawn

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Latin - start of new year COMPLETED
« on: Saturday 03 February 18 07:14 GMT (UK) »
I would love to complete the transcription/translation of this Latin text. It is obviously indicating the start of a new year in the records.

So far, this is my guess ;
Sequantur nomina eor[um] qui[cumque] bapti[zati] nupta .... sepul[tus] fuerunt & festo annu[nciationi]s beata Maria Virginis Anno Dom[ini] in 1628 usq[ue] ad ide[m] festo Ano 1629 . . . . 1628

Can anyone help me please?

Regards
Grantley

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Offline grantleydawn

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Re: Latin - start of new year
« Reply #1 on: Saturday 03 February 18 07:15 GMT (UK) »
This image may help, it was from a few years earlier.

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Offline CarolA3

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Re: Latin - start of new year
« Reply #2 on: Saturday 03 February 18 07:33 GMT (UK) »
From Wikipedia entry for 'Lady Day':

'In the western liturgical year, Lady Day is the traditional name in some English speaking countries of the Feast of the Annunciation (25 March), known in the 1549 Prayer Book of Edward VI and the 1667 Book of Common Prayer as "The Annunciation of the (Blessed) Virgin Mary" but more accurately (as currently in the 1997 Calendar of the Church of England) termed "The Annunciation of our Lord to the Blessed Virgin Mary". .................. In England, Lady Day was New Year's Day between 1155 and 1752, after which 1 January was declared to be the official start of the year.'

Hope this helps.

Carol
OXFORDSHIRE / BERKSHIRE
Bullock, Cooper, Boler/Bowler, Wright, Robinson, Lee, Prior, Trinder, Newman, Walklin, Louch

Offline Bookbox

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Re: Latin - start of new year
« Reply #3 on: Saturday 03 February 18 12:42 GMT (UK) »
From the 2nd image ...

Sequuntur nomina eoru(m) qui baptizati nuptiati aut sepulti ^fuer(unt)^
a festo Annunciationis beatŠ MariŠ virginis Anno domin(i)
1625 usq(ue) ad ide(m) festu(m) Anno 1626 p(ro) uno anno
integro (...) existenti: currente 1625:

The names follow of those who were baptized, married or buried from the Feast of the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary in the year of the Lord 1625 up to the same feast in the year 1626, being for one entire year: currently 1625.

=====
Still puzzling over the word after integro, perhaps including an -er suspension, but I'll come back to it.


Offline grantleydawn

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Re: Latin - start of new year
« Reply #4 on: Saturday 03 February 18 21:06 GMT (UK) »
Thank you very much, Carol & Bookbox.

The word following integro (in the 1st image) now looks like id.

I am now happy with what I have and I can move on. Thanks again.

Regards
Grantley