Author Topic: The Second Mort Cloth  (Read 725 times)

Offline MrSaunders

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The Second Mort Cloth
« on: Thursday 29 March 18 03:55 BST (UK) »
Hello,
What does it mean to have "the second mort cloth"?
Thanks!
In Scotland:-
McCulloch, Saunders, Sanders, Sanderson, Saunderson, Anderson, Ward, Graham
In England:-
Lovell, Ward, Didmon, Harman

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Offline pet50ite

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Re: The Second Mort Cloth
« Reply #1 on: Thursday 29 March 18 06:30 BST (UK) »
Hi MrSaunders, I know this won't solve your problems but mort is the french word for dead. What the cloth and second has to do with it, I'm afraid I don't know
pet50ite
cowan, sinnott, duffy, addi, conlon, halpin, (dublin) dowling, mcdonald, donnelly (dublin, newcastle upon tyne and tyrone)

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Offline MrSaunders

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Re: The Second Mort Cloth
« Reply #2 on: Thursday 29 March 18 06:32 BST (UK) »
Thank you. I know about the custom of using a mort cloth - a black veil over a coffin - but it's the meaning behind the "second" that escapes me!
In Scotland:-
McCulloch, Saunders, Sanders, Sanderson, Saunderson, Anderson, Ward, Graham
In England:-
Lovell, Ward, Didmon, Harman

Offline Ruskie

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Re: The Second Mort Cloth
« Reply #3 on: Thursday 29 March 18 07:26 BST (UK) »
Maybe it was a mort cloth of lesser quality?  :-\

Offline Berlin-Bob

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Re: The Second Mort Cloth
« Reply #4 on: Thursday 29 March 18 07:49 BST (UK) »
There are several Rootschat topics about mort cloths, listed here:

Quote
Scot.: Mortcloths were hired out by the kirk session to cover a coffin
http://surname.rootschat.com/lexicon/reflib-lexicon.php?letter=M

Maybe one of these topics will give a reason for a "second mort cloth".

Bob
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My research interests (and data found) can be seen on my website:   http://www.margulies-chronicles.com/

Offline GR2

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Re: The Second Mort Cloth
« Reply #5 on: Thursday 29 March 18 10:07 BST (UK) »
It was quite common for parishes to have more than one mortcloth. Sometimes a new one was made or presented to the kirk before the old one wore out. One might be heavier than the other or made of velvet. The "second" mortcloth may have been cheaper to hire than the "first" one. Have a look on the page of the accounts and see if there is a different charge for the first and second cloths. In any case the money went into the poor-box.

Offline Skoosh

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Re: The Second Mort Cloth
« Reply #6 on: Thursday 29 March 18 10:41 BST (UK) »
A velvet pall used to cover coffins which varied a lot in quality thus adding respectability to the funeral. The fee for the hire went to the kirk funds. The Second Mort-Cloth would just be the old one so cheaper!

You can imagine the adverse comments after a funeral on the condition of some coffins if there was no Mort-Cloth, nobody seen the coffin! Comments were saved for the whisky dispensed, or the lack of it!  ;D

Skoosh.

Offline GR2

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Re: The Second Mort Cloth
« Reply #7 on: Thursday 29 March 18 16:41 BST (UK) »
Cost of the funeral of Elizabeth Allan, d. Aberdeen, buried Methlick 1800.

1. Mr Catto, merchant Aberdeen, for rum and wine 1 7s 6d
2. John Ferguson for grave linen 13s 9 1/2d
3. John Ligertwood, wright, for coffin 1 1s
4. Peter Imlay, stabler Aberdeen, for hay and corn to hearse horses 13s 3d
5. James Imlay for hearse to Methlick 1 10s
6. John Lumsden, merchant Aberdeen, for tea & sugar 11s 6d
7. For bread 7s 6d
8. Grave digger at Methlick 4s
9. Meal, butter, cheese, candle, tobacco 1 4s

Offline Skoosh

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Re: The Second Mort Cloth
« Reply #8 on: Thursday 29 March 18 20:46 BST (UK) »
I would think that the availability of factory-made coffins in Victorian times, together with the Kirk being relieved of the burden of providing for the Poor under the Poor Laws, made the Mort-Cloth obsolete.

Highland funerals in particular were noted for the quantity of spirits consumed. That of the auld mother of Forbes of Culloden, (a family  who were famously fond of a hauf!) was attended by hundreds of tenants & gentry. Such was the liberality of hospitality dispensed that the funeral party arrived at the kirk without the coffin!  ;D

Skoosh.