Author Topic: Bird's eye view of Victorian Manchester  (Read 436 times)

Offline Footo

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Bird's eye view of Victorian Manchester
« on: Sunday 08 April 18 21:16 BST (UK) »
I found this in the Manchester Evening News and thought it would interest some people here and put Manchester in to some kind of perspective for the 1850ís. Personally I found it fascinating and had to keep watching to see what I recognised that still stands today.


Neil Millington, a 3D animator and amateur historian, created the visual interpretation from 12 Ordnance Survey map sheets covering Manchester city centre in 1850.

Happy viewing

Barbara ;)

https://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/greater-manchester-news/flyover-footage-captures-birds-eye-14502824


Meehan Currell Gee Withers Dodd

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Offline Viktoria

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Re: Bird's eye view of Victorian Manchester
« Reply #1 on: Sunday 08 April 18 21:24 BST (UK) »
Thanks Barbara,it went a bit fast  on first viewing, I could not get my bearings,but all those mills.
I`m going to have another go.Thanks again.
                                                    Viktoria.

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Offline Footo

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Re: Bird's eye view of Victorian Manchester
« Reply #2 on: Sunday 08 April 18 21:32 BST (UK) »
Thereís a square to the bottom right that opens the video to full screen if youíre not familiar with videos. The bar at the bottom that scrolls along (scrub rate) can be held with mouse pointer or finger on an iPad after watching it through once so you can slide it along at your own rate.

Hope that helps...

Meehan Currell Gee Withers Dodd

Offline Viktoria

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Re: Bird's eye view of Victorian Manchester
« Reply #3 on: Monday 09 April 18 00:28 BST (UK) »
Thanks very much, will do.Viktoria

Offline Ruskie

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Re: Bird's eye view of Victorian Manchester
« Reply #4 on: Monday 09 April 18 00:37 BST (UK) »
I have no connections to Manchester but still found this fascinating. I hope he goes on to do the same with other cities.  :)

If you click your mouse on the screen it pauses. This gives you a chance to have a closer look and read the street names etc. Then click again to continue.

Offline Viktoria

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Re: Bird's eye view of Victorian Manchester
« Reply #5 on: Monday 09 April 18 02:42 BST (UK) »
Well it is the early hours of Monday morning,I am now off to bed after a fascinating  few hours
"Strolling " the streets of Victorian M/C.

Goodnight and thankyou,Viktoria.

Offline andrewalston

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Re: Bird's eye view of Victorian Manchester
« Reply #6 on: Monday 09 April 18 13:24 BST (UK) »
An excellent piece of work. I think Neil has captured a lot of the atmosphere, although thankfully not the smoke!

Quite early on there is a view of Victoria Station, with the Walker's Croft Cemetery alongside. It's not a name I recognised, so looked it up. It brings up a page relating to the exhumation of bodies during alterations to to the station. The article says the cemetery was associated with the nearby workhouse, but maps of a similar period show that it was one of the graveyards for Manchester Collegiate church, now the cathedral, so not just paupers buried there.

Since there was a very limited space in the Collegiate Church precincts, and not exactly a lot of space around, it seems likely that tens of thousands of those burials mentioned in the registers would have been in Walker's Croft.

Looking at ALSTON in south Ribble area, ALSTEAD and DONBAVAND/DUNBABIN etc. everywhere, HOWCROFT and MARSH in Bolton and Westhoughton, PICKERING in the Whitehaven area.

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