Author Topic: i would love to Ireland's language  (Read 1681 times)

Offline Jack Boyd

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i would love to Ireland's language
« on: Saturday 12 May 18 16:37 BST (UK) »
i was never taught to speak my home country's language but could never get anyone to teach me i can listen and hear the beauty of Ireland in it but only ever learned few words and tell me i am not a true son of Ireland even those who were my friends were told not to teach me  even though i was born in the same country i was an outcast

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Offline dublin1850

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Re: i would love to Ireland's language
« Reply #1 on: Saturday 12 May 18 16:41 BST (UK) »
Coffey, Cummins, Cummins [Skirke, Laois], Curran, Dillon [Clare], Fogarty [Garran, Laois/Tipp], Hughes, Keshan (Keeshan), Loughman [Killadooley, Laois], Mallon [Armagh], Malone, Markham [Caherkine, Clare], McKeon [Sligo/Kilkenny], McNamara, Meagher, Prescott [Kilkenny/Waterford/Wexford?], Rafferty, Ryan, Sullivan, Tobin
GEDMatch: T665306 tested with Family Tree DNA
GEDCOM file: 1980344

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Offline Viktoria

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Re: i would love to Ireland's language
« Reply #2 on: Saturday 12 May 18 20:40 BST (UK) »
I think it is a very good idea to try to learn a language especially one that means a lot to you.
It would be a tragedy should these minority languages die out as has Cornish.
When a language has been proscribed as was Irish and Scots Gaelic and,Welsh,there is always a
loss of course of those for whom it was their first language and the purity suffers .
Do it for your own satisfaction ,  also because the more people who speak a language the more chance there is that it will survive.
I can tell that means a lot to you.
Let us know how you get on.
                        Best wishes with it .Viktoria.
   

Offline Andalula

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Re: i would love to Ireland's language
« Reply #3 on: Monday 15 October 18 07:34 BST (UK) »
Hi,
I have to say - I never comment here, but there are so many resources these days. I feel compelled to spew it out for all to see. Despite the fact im on my phone typing in lowercase with hamhands.

For the basics, try Duolingo. It's free. That said, make sure you use it in a non-mobile environment, meaning a laptop or desktop. The mobile site does not have the forum per question. And the tips, which are really lessons, are not easy to access if you use your phone. That is where the power of duolingo is, the pre-quiz tips and superuser answers.

There is also Memrise app, Quizlet app (look for classes by Spaceboy76, my local teacher or mùinteior, ask to add his class even if your not in Los Angeles). Someone mentioned Bùntus cainte (they have cds, books and online resources). Smart TVs have a TG4 app but my subtitles dont work, but they work at a computer. I like the subtitles 'as Geailge' so I can keep up. Look up a program called *love under lock* on youtube: "gra faoi ghlas* it's a fake reality show for language learners.
My favorite online dixtionary is:
https://www.teanglann.ie. Thry have audio component under another tab.

The philoceltic society teaches via a yahoo group starting in Oct. every year. They have the mp3 audio translations of "Progress in Irish" (book) Lessons. And someone else posts the answer key in PDF. You can also buy or steal a pdf of Nancy Stetson's book on irish pronounciation. Wikipedia has an Irish orthography page that is helpful once you get rolling and Forvo is a website where users speak words and phrases aloud for people learning the language in question. Many Irish words and phrases there.

Finally, join a class where you live. Many cities have them. If you use progress in irish, it helps to have someone tell you what the point of each lesson is. It's not explicit. The pther books we use are Gailge Gan Stò (also comes/w CDs). LA has the celtic arts center and three other groups that I know of. SF has more and the east coast is lousy with Irish speakers, which is where the philoceltic society is based. 

Start with duolingo. It will give you the basics. Then move on. See this man's post on reddit:
https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.reddit.com/r/gaeilge/comments/5f8cc0/why_not_duolingo_and_what_to_use_instead/

In future, Say Something in Welsh website is going to release an Irish resource soon. They have a really great way of teaching unique to them.

Finally, if anyone is desperate for irish speakers, chexk out your local hurling teams. The Play Hurling LA website can help you find them.  It's a given because most of the hurlers ive met are 20 year old guys from Ireland, just in the States for a short while. Most have been given some Irish in school.


Offline Andalula

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Re: i would love to Ireland's language
« Reply #4 on: Monday 15 October 18 07:34 BST (UK) »
Now - the reason I felt moved to write all this is that you are correct. Language is an important part of our lost culture. Language literally creates a framework for your brain to understand the world. If you need evidence that your forebearers saw the world differently, learning irish (even if you are not one allele irish), will help. See the way I wrote that? With the "will help" at the end? That's because my family has mostly non-english speaking roots, even though I have like half the mayflower as ancestors along one little pathway. And all those romance language speakering ancestors and children of celtic language speakers, they didn't mind putting the cart before the horse, syntactically speaking. They used complex sentences with glee. Irish is like that too. Everything is VSO, verb subject object. You really have to get all the way to the end of the sentence before you can untangle and understand it. There is a lot that Irish speakers hold in their head while speaking, reading and listening. It's part of the language. In our super economic anglo world, this is bad form.  See? i did it again.  That sentence would be corrected by an editor to begin: it is poor form in our economic world to....

Irish has no word for "have". You don't speak Irish, you have Irish, but since there is no word for it, Irish is "at you."  If you ask me if I speak Irish, my reply is Ta Gaeilge agam, or Irish is at me. Or i have Irish on me. The verb comes first, though so "Ta" is the verb To Be (or "is") Although it changes in different contexts, much in the same way latin does.

Irish has different numbers for people, for counting and for things.

There is no word for "yes" in Irish. You use the verb. Are you going? Answer: Going/Not going. Although, you will hear people say just Nìl, that is only used in copula form.

The copula is a type is sentence that is used when something is equal to something else - the two things can be compared, irrespective of time. You'll see the word "is" but youd be wrong to think of it like the English 'is.' For example, If my house is green, the copula creates a way to say "my house, it equals green / or my house "is" green. I think it would read word for word like "Is house green," but not a question. Questions are signalled anothwr way. But youd never say it that way for something impermenant. Is bron mè (copula form of sentence), doesn't mean I am sad. It means I am the very embodiment of sadness all of the time and this will not change. Youd be saying, sadz and me, we are the same thing. To say "I am sad," you'd say, Ta bròn orm. Or sad is "at me" or "on me." I like that much better. Like you could just swat it away.

I don't hope or wish for things, I have an eye towards it. And I don't listen *to* you, I listen *with* you.

Irish is beautiful and it helps me understand the world better.  If anyone here is thinking about diving in, I promise you, all you need is your decoder ring (understanding the Irish alphabet) and an open mind. And maybe maybe years to emerse yourself, because you won't learn it in ten weeks. More like ten years. But it will open your mind and give you eyes to see the past with. If youre an american english speaker, suddenly many phrases will make sense to you. If you are not of Irish descent, think of all the non-English English speakers and take the plunge. Languages are alive when working between cultures, not just within cultures.

Good luck!
Go n-eiri an t-adh leat! Which means: something...somethingly.."the luck with you".

Irish [type of] the luck be with you, that's it. 

Offline Andalula

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Re: i would love to Ireland's language
« Reply #5 on: Monday 15 October 18 07:38 BST (UK) »
And don't even get me started on initial mutation, the calling card of all Celtic languages. Instead, let duolingo break it down for you.

Offline hallmark

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Re: i would love to Ireland's language
« Reply #6 on: Monday 15 October 18 07:48 BST (UK) »
And don't even get me started on initial mutation, the calling card of all Celtic languages. Instead, let duolingo break it down for you.



Ok!

Offline Viktoria

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Re: i would love to Ireland's language
« Reply #7 on: Monday 15 October 18 10:58 BST (UK) »
A very long time ago,in 1953,when I went into the sixth form I chose Greek as one of my subjects,why I was allowed to do that escapes me because a lot of translating was done through Latin and not being in the top stream I had not done OLevel Latin.
So I was not very good.
But certain things I remember,eg,a sentence such as “The ships in the harbour “ becomes “The in the harbour ships”.
I remember also the word for king is Basil but can change depending on the meaning of the sentence,Basil,Basileus,  Ebebasileus,Ebebasileukathon.
I use that al the time———not,in fact can’t recall a single instance.

It amazes me how many languages some people are truly fluent in.

The order of words in a sentence is very different in other languages too.
I wonder why there are so many languages,when did they develop and why the different sentence construction,placement of strong and weak verbs etc.
I must confess it does not keep me awake at night ::)
But it is interesting and I remember one instance of such a difference in Irish.
An American tourist asked an old Irish man who was leaning on his gate contemplating the world,”Excuse me, where does this road go to?”
The reply was ,”Sure and all sir, it goes nowhere ,it stays here but if you go along it you will get to the next village.”
I like that.
Viktoria.

Offline Sinann

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Re: i would love to Ireland's language
« Reply #8 on: Monday 15 October 18 11:59 BST (UK) »
 ;D ;D ;D