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General => The Common Room => The Lighter Side => Topic started by: IgorStrav on Friday 19 December 08 22:20 GMT (UK)

Title: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: IgorStrav on Friday 19 December 08 22:20 GMT (UK)
Following up the thread about twang toed, I was reminded of an expression my mother (a native Londoner) used when something happened which was rather good.... she would say

"Well, that's better than a poke in the eye with a dirty stick!"


I have used this most of my life - I think it's quite expressive  ;) - but a lot of people find it very odd.

However, I once met someone from Hull, and he said in his part of the world the expression was


"Better than a slap in the belly with a wet fish!"

which seems very appropriate for Hull.


Any other variants?  Does anyone else recognise this one?
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: hepburn on Friday 19 December 08 22:46 GMT (UK)
We must be a bit crude where I come from.......It's better than a kick up the a***...... :o
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: IgorStrav on Friday 19 December 08 22:53 GMT (UK)
Well, of course there is always that one........ ;D

My mother was too refined for that one, although she was prone to say when she was very lively that she felt "Like 10 men, one after another!"

I still remember how shocked I was when I realised the implications...... :D
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Paul Caswell on Friday 19 December 08 23:01 GMT (UK)
I remember:

Better than a poke in the eye with a blunt stick.

Better than a slap in the face with a wet fish.

Sorry, I have no idea why I remember them, or from where or when.

Paul
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: NadT on Friday 19 December 08 23:27 GMT (UK)
very similar to Pauls' - It used to be 'better then a poke in the eye with a sharp stick'.  I'm from Wales and my hubby from Shropshire - we both use the same saying!
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: 7igerby7he7ail on Saturday 20 December 08 06:29 GMT (UK)
Better than a poke in the eye with a burnt stick was one that I heard and used in Manchester
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: purlin on Saturday 20 December 08 11:59 GMT (UK)
better than charity and that's chilly,  better than my poor willy!      and he's been dead a fortnight, poor ba *    *d!!
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: nort on Sunday 21 December 08 11:17 GMT (UK)
Well, of course there is always that one........ ;D

My mother was too refined for that one, although she was prone to say when she was very lively that she felt "Like 10 men, one after another!"

I still remember how shocked I was when I realised the implications...... :D

when my grandad felt a bit lively he'd say " I cud bull a coo" (cow to non geordies.) ;D
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Emjaybee on Sunday 21 December 08 18:07 GMT (UK)
How about:

All my eye and Betty Martin
Up in Annie's room behind the clock
Joe soap from the roundhouse, lived in the middle one of them two and went upstairs to get down into the cellar.
Colder than a witches t*t
Rough as a bears a**e
When that worm turned it had an elephants foot
One sandwich short of a picnic
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: BumbleB on Sunday 21 December 08 18:17 GMT (UK)
Does anyone know where the expression "just a tad" comes from?  I've looked and googled, and googled and looked, and absolutely nothing, but everyone knows the expression!

BumbleB  :-\
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: BumbleB on Sunday 21 December 08 18:18 GMT (UK)
And another, and this one is truly weird - I'll give you the answer later?

What is a moggie?

BumbleB
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: geniecolgan on Sunday 21 December 08 18:25 GMT (UK)
A moggie is a cat (usually black).

Back to the original question......

the Canadian variant is "A kick in the a*se with a frozen boot"  ;D
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: sem73 on Sunday 21 December 08 18:26 GMT (UK)
Hi BumbleB

Does this help??.....

tad   
–noun Informal.
1.a small child, esp. a boy.
2.a very small amount or degree; bit
Origin:
1875–80, Americanism, for def. 1; 1935–40, Americanism, for def. 2; perh. shortening of tadpole

http://dictionary.reference.com

Sarah :)
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: sem73 on Sunday 21 December 08 18:30 GMT (UK)
Strangest one I've heard locally ...... I feel deletion coming on!! ;D....

"what r u having for dinner?"

"pigs [email protected]*k and lettuce" ie: haven't got a clue/nothing in!!  :o

Sarah :)
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: BumbleB on Sunday 21 December 08 19:34 GMT (UK)
Thanks sem73 for "tad", well that's certainly how I understand it - a little bit, therefore a tadpole.

Sorry geniecolgan - wrong.  That's a bit too easy!  Everyone thinks it's a cat, except .....

BumbleB   ::)
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: IgorStrav on Sunday 21 December 08 21:08 GMT (UK)
You tease, you, Bumble  ;)

Don't know what a moggie is except a cat.................
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Lydart on Sunday 21 December 08 21:22 GMT (UK)
Thanks sem73 for "tad", well that's certainly how I understand it - a little bit, therefore a tadpole.

Sorry geniecolgan - wrong.  That's a bit too easy!  Everyone thinks it's a cat, except .....

BumbleB   ::)

I've got a different one from Suffolk for 'a tad' ...

"She's so mean she'd lick a tanner out of a tad"

meaning "she so mean she would lick a sixpence out of a cow-pat"


Well, you DID ask !
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: BettyofKent on Sunday 21 December 08 21:52 GMT (UK)
A variant of that: someone so mean they would "skin a turd for a tanner"
Now that's really lowered the tone! :o

How about "black over Bill's mother's" meaning bad weather coming. I think the name of the man varies round the country.

Betty
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: BumbleB on Sunday 21 December 08 23:03 GMT (UK)
Hi:  so no-one lives near Tamworth in Staffordshire?!

In Tamworth, believe it or not, a moggie is a mouse!!

You do get some funny looks when you talk about your pet moggie.

Have a good Christmas

BumbleB   ::)  ::)
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: maidmarianoops on Sunday 21 December 08 23:35 GMT (UK)
this should help maybe a tad too much

http://www.websters-dictionary-online.org/definitions/english/ta/tad.html



moggies  CATS
http://www.flickr.com/photos/supermunchie/2876571958/


sylvia
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: MKG on Monday 22 December 08 00:29 GMT (UK)
Yep - In South Yorkshire (or at least around Doncaster) in the early 60s, a moggie was both - a cat and a mouse. Makes for an interesting chase.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Cell on Monday 22 December 08 08:01 GMT (UK)
Hi,
The word Moggie/moggy apparently was first used to describe old cows according to the below article( don't know how true it is) and may come from the name Margaret.

I use moggie  to describe  mongrel cats and of course the Morris Minor. It mentions in the article that it is used for mouse too
Just a wee tad here is the article:
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moggy
Kind Regards :)
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Emjaybee on Monday 22 December 08 09:05 GMT (UK)
Moggie:

A Morgan car made in Malvern
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Dancing Master on Monday 22 December 08 19:16 GMT (UK)
When asking "what is for dinner the Lancashire answer was "Pigs bum and cabbage". or an alternative  the rude word for muck with sugar on.

Moggie depends on where you live,  In South of Lancashire its a mouse,  in North of Lancashire its a cat.

Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: BumbleB on Monday 22 December 08 19:55 GMT (UK)
Ad I'd never come across the term moggie meeting mouse until I came to live in Tamworth, I assumed it was very local.  Now realise that it is widespread!  We all learn something every day  :-[

Dancing Master - my grandmother always, when asked what is for dinner, replied "chums".  West Riding ?

BumbleB
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: pete edwards on Monday 22 December 08 21:26 GMT (UK)
Im Starved,

any idea what that means here in Shropshire?

Pete :) :)
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: vic1 on Monday 22 December 08 21:48 GMT (UK)
I'm starved means I'm cold  or at least it does in north herefordshire
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: pete edwards on Monday 22 December 08 22:02 GMT (UK)
Hi Vic :)

What about  " Mizzle "

Pete :) :)
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: vic1 on Monday 22 December 08 22:20 GMT (UK)
I 've heard that one but can't remember what it refers to i think it may have two meaning and one means a part of the male anatomy. partner knows but hes out.
he uses lots of radnorshire  expression  which i 've never heard of and we grew up only 10 miles from each other.

 the one we both use is  ( i won't spell this properly i know )
 "you're a mucken grunt ." which means you're a dirty pig but its so onomatapiec its lovely to say.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Just Kia on Tuesday 23 December 08 00:07 GMT (UK)
Colder than a witches t*t
Rough as a bears a**e
Warwickshire and my mum would refer to pop/soda that was no longer fizzy as "that's flatter than a witches t*t".
rough as a badger's a**e, is the version I've heard.
Sweet Fanny Adams - meaning 'nothing' as in "there's nothing for dinner"

Other's include
Face like a bag of spanners
Up n' down (the stairs/street/ladder) like a bride's nightie
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Josephine on Tuesday 23 December 08 00:22 GMT (UK)
My husband says, "That's better than a poke in the eye with a sharp stick". 

His grandparents were from the Wirral, West Kirby, Cheshire.

I had never heard it before my husband said it to me.

Regards,
Josephine
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Inicky on Tuesday 23 December 08 00:27 GMT (UK)
feeling '  rough as a badgers a**e'     ;D  north east


Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: liverpool annie on Tuesday 23 December 08 01:43 GMT (UK)


What's to eat ?? ........ Bread and spit and duck under the table !!!!!!!

A moggie is a cat in Liverpool ... as in " kicked a moggie down de jigger "!!!!!!!!!!!  :D :D
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: rancegal on Tuesday 23 December 08 09:47 GMT (UK)

     " kicked a moggie down de jigger"  

    I assume that's what we in Northants would call a 'jitty'

    How about "bolsh"  (to fling yourself down, esp. on to furniture)

   I can hear my grandma now! "Dawnchiw bolsh down on that there sofa!"
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: mazwad on Tuesday 23 December 08 19:54 GMT (UK)
When we asked our mum what was for dinner she always replied

Bread and pull it,  the further you pull it the further it will go.


Her other favourite, when we moaned that something was not fair, she would say

Well its market then.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Just Kia on Wednesday 24 December 08 00:26 GMT (UK)
When we asked our mum what was for dinner she always replied
Bread and pull it, the further you pull it the further it will go.
Oh I forgot that one, my dad always used to say it - well, in the context of that's what he was going to eat himself.
I remember Sunday evenings when my grandparents would be out and it was just me and my dad, he'd make bread and pull it then. It's where my love of crusts came from.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: pete edwards on Wednesday 24 December 08 00:45 GMT (UK)
H i JustKia :)


Did you know where the saying " Sweet Fanny Adams "  Came from ?

www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/341000.html - 9k

P.S, this site contains a few swear words,

Pete, :)

P.P.S   mizzle is light rain around here
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Just Kia on Wednesday 24 December 08 01:09 GMT (UK)
Well, no I didn't know it referred to a real person. I always assumed someone must have had the name seeing as neither first nor last were particularly uncommon, but not that it specifically referred to someone (in such sad circumstances too).
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Viktoria on Wednesday 24 December 08 01:37 GMT (UK)
When we asked Mum what we were having to eat she invariably said "two jumps at the cupboard door and a bite of the knob" which was so daft it infuriated me. I can also remember her telling me -and I fell for it for years_ "go and stand on the front step and look for the man with as many noses as there are days in the year" I stood for hours expecting to see someone with lots of noses, I must have been very easily fooled as she only said this on New Years Eve!!!!!!!
 Mum would give us a smack if we had been naughty and when she had brought tears to our eyes and we  were skriking -crying to any Southerners- she would then say " shut up or I will give you something to cry for"  When Dad was hungry he`d say he was" ravished" which was hungrier than famished and worse than ravenous he also described cheap jewellery as "shikeling" -sparkling and shining but I think there is a yiddish word similar in sound which means the same although Dad was not Jewish.  Happy Christmas to everyone Viktoria. :'( :'( :'( :'( :'(         cryfor                                                                                                                                   
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Dancing Master on Wednesday 24 December 08 16:10 GMT (UK)
Stop that skriking or you'll get some at to skrik for..

Liverpool has always had its own words totally different for the rest of Lancashire.   Where we would say grandma  it was Nin  in common usage in Liverpool I believe this is from the Welsh families who settled there.

And I think the expression "Fur Coat and no knickers was common in various places , meaning all top show.


Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: IgorStrav on Saturday 27 December 08 18:07 GMT (UK)
All RED HAT and no knickers it was in my location - London.

Definitely stop that crying, or I'll give you something to cry for.

One of my favourites, though not from my own childhood, is the call of his grandmother to a friend of mine, when he'd pick up the pet cat under the front legs, and try and "walk" it along.................. 
"Don't schlep the cat!"

Now that IS a Jewish expression.

 :)
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Olly on Sunday 28 December 08 06:41 GMT (UK)
Liverpool again
Lace curtains on the window, no sheets on the bed.

When I was teaching it always amazed me how many different words are used for the same thing in different locations.
Pumps, gym shoes, plimsolls, sand shoes is just one that comes to mind.

Any others?
Olly
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Abiam2 on Sunday 28 December 08 07:37 GMT (UK)
How about

"That's life in a blue suit!"

My OH says about life, he was in the Navy maybe it comes from there!

Abiam
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Greensleeves on Monday 29 December 08 10:25 GMT (UK)
When I bothered my Suffolk grandmother for something, she would reply "If wishes were horses, beggars would ride!"
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Mark1973 on Monday 29 December 08 13:41 GMT (UK)
I still want to know who Gordon Bennett is?
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: suzard on Monday 29 December 08 13:48 GMT (UK)
for Gordon Bennett info
http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/gordon-bennett.html


Suz
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: suzard on Monday 29 December 08 13:55 GMT (UK)
Olly,

Another word for gym shoes = "daps"

Having moved to South Wales -and my son tarting school there -he arrived home stating he had to have a "dap bag"

I had no idea what this could be -so asked one or two other mothers what did they use a dap bag for -was told "to keep daps in""

When asked what "daps were" I was told "you know DAPS"!!!!

no wiser I enquired where to purchase one - and was told "we usually make them"

It was a couple of weeks before I realised he wanted a PE bag to keep his gym shoes in!!!

Suz
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: IgorStrav on Monday 29 December 08 21:58 GMT (UK)
That's reminded me of the words you used when you wanted to step out of a game for a moment

We used to say "Vainites" or "Vains", which meant that whoever was chasing you (or whatever) had to stop for a moment.

I think there are lots of local variants aren't there?  Does anyone remember theirs?
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: alpinecottage on Monday 29 December 08 22:12 GMT (UK)
In Sth Manchester, we used to say "barley" or "barleys" if you had to stop in a game for a moment and you didn't want to be caught.

A phrase of my mother's was "Stop mithering me" if we were pestering her.

And if you wanted to reserve something for yourself, you could "baggsie" it
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: IgorStrav on Monday 29 December 08 22:22 GMT (UK)
Yes, I remember bagseying the desks next to the radiator at school  ;)

Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: NadT on Tuesday 30 December 08 00:09 GMT (UK)

Yes, when I was  kid we used to bagsey things, my children still do now!  My dad tells me up north in Newcastle they were 'cruse' to keep them safe when playing a game of tag etc.   I remember we were always 'cree'  when we were in Cardiff.  Don't know why or where it came  from.  You just couldn't be caught if you were cree.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Jean McGurn on Tuesday 30 December 08 07:21 GMT (UK)
Yes, I remember bagseying the desks next to the radiator at school ;)



That's brought back a dim and distant memory. Whilst on school holiday (think I was 9 or 10yrs old) I was staying with a relative, we went to visit the grave of her son. There was a playmate with us and I can remember just before we tended the grave saying to my friend "Bags I do this side". Boy did I get told off.


One expression I still use a lot is "Two's up" when I want to be next to borrow something.

Jean 
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: heywood on Tuesday 30 December 08 10:16 GMT (UK)
Oh I love all this...
It's funny isn't it how the affection comes through even though we were threatened so often - my mum used to say 'stop skriking or I'll give you summat to skrike for" ; ' sh** wi' sugar on' for tea etc.

How about 'he could eat one tater more than a pig'
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Abiam2 on Tuesday 30 December 08 13:00 GMT (UK)
What did we say Feynies sic. for?  Can't remember!

No-one has picked up on 'That's life in a blue suit' where does it come from ant ideas?

Abiam
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: IgorStrav on Tuesday 30 December 08 14:51 GMT (UK)
Vains, or Vainites was when, for example, you'd tripped up and hurt your knee in a chasing game, and you were telling your pursuer you weren't in the game for a moment.  I've heard it as Fains from elsewhere.

As for Life in a Blue Suit, well, that's the first time I've heard that one!  Probably from the Navy as you say.  What did it mean..............well, there you go?

Also, another one, when there was something particularly dramatic or melodramatic on the tv, my Mum used to say "kee, bly".  Anyone else heard of that?  I think it was a refined version of cor bl.imey, but was reserved only for melodramatic moments.

Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Mark1973 on Tuesday 30 December 08 15:30 GMT (UK)
for Gordon Bennett info
http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/gordon-bennett.html


Suz

Nice one, thank you  :)
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: johnnyboy on Tuesday 30 December 08 22:05 GMT (UK)
Hi all: Having spoken it all my life, I thought I knew my English...until I read this thread. Go figure, as they say while schlepping around New York.

I did look up "tad" (meaning "small amount") at the Oxford English Dictionary Online. The first written citation comes from 1940 and was recorded in volume 15 (1940) of American Speech, a scholarly journal. I was able to find the journal online at an academic library. "Tad" is included in a collection of expressions from late 1930s Tennessee.

Considering that the word was first recorded in Tennessee, but its use is being discussed on a website that is located in the U.K. and used in large part by people from the U.K., I think what we have here is an example of the chicken coming home to roost. That is: many of the early settlers of Tennessee were Scotch-Irish (as we call them in the U.S.) and English. When they settled in Tennessee, many of them lived in isolated rural areas, and I think the word is a relic of the early settlers, brought across the Atlantic. The other Oxford English Dictionary definitions of "tad"--such as a small boy--are recorded much earlier, although all of them do originate in the U.S.

I've attached edited images show the beginning of the article and the end of the article, with "tad" and many other Tennessee expressions.

Oh, yes, where I grew up in the U.S. (Pennsylvania) we also described low-temperature days as "Colder than a witch's t*t in a brass br*."

Regards and a Happy 2009 to all,
John  :o :o :o
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: IgorStrav on Tuesday 30 December 08 22:29 GMT (UK)
They're fantastic John!

I just love "ankled" for walked!

 ;)

We also have "colder than a witches' t*t" in the UK.  My Dad used to say that.

Or Brass Monkeys!

Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: johnnyboy on Tuesday 30 December 08 23:04 GMT (UK)
Hi IgorStrav and others: Since you liked "ankle," here are the middle columns of the article I posted above. I'm partial to "crawling dandruff."

John  :o :o :o
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: IgorStrav on Tuesday 30 December 08 23:11 GMT (UK)
Crawling Dandruff!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: GeoffE on Tuesday 30 December 08 23:15 GMT (UK)
Pumps, gym shoes, plimsolls, sand shoes is just one that comes to mind.

Any others?


In Glawstersher an' Brizzle, em 'as daps.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: GeoffE on Tuesday 30 December 08 23:23 GMT (UK)
1) In Sth Manchester, we used to say "barley" or "barleys" if you had to stop in a game for a moment and you didn't want to be caught.

2) And if you wanted to reserve something for yourself, you could "baggsie" it

1) I think I've they use something like reases/creasers for the game "immunity" round these parts (Glos).

2) In Lincoln, the verb was "to bags" as in, "I bags the seat by the window".
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Olly on Wednesday 31 December 08 07:15 GMT (UK)
All me eye and Peggy Martin - I've never followed this one up, but I'm sure someone will know who she was.

Then there's sky blue pink with a finny haddy border.
My gran used to use these way back in the fifties in Liverpool.

Yes, I used barley for taking a break in a game and bagsy for wanting something when I was little.

Olly
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: nort on Wednesday 31 December 08 13:45 GMT (UK)


Then there's sky blue pink with a finny haddy border.

we say sky blue pink with yellow dots !

Steve
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: rancegal on Wednesday 31 December 08 19:18 GMT (UK)
 
  Our local version of 'Vainites' was 'Kings'
  If anyone was really mean with money, my dad used to say 'Tight as a mouse's earole', only I think he might have used a different part of its body if he was at work!    ;D
   Mother hated anyone asking what was for dinner, and her answer was always 'Wait- and- see pie'
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: aberdein on Wednesday 31 December 08 19:50 GMT (UK)
We used to say "Skinch" which was supposed to be a corruption of sanctuary

aberdein
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: coombs on Wednesday 31 December 08 20:06 GMT (UK)
My Essex family say "Wattice" instead of "What's it" when asking what something is.

Scran is Liverpool for food.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Caz1960 on Wednesday 31 December 08 22:03 GMT (UK)
When asked what was for tea, my mother used to say Paddy Shot It  :-\

Took me years to work out that Paddy never shot anything lol
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Michael J on Wednesday 31 December 08 22:35 GMT (UK)
'All my eye and Betty Martin' comes from one of the Anglo-Spanish wars and is the English soldier's version of the Spanish war cry : 'Mihi Beathe Martine' (may not have got the spelling right . . . .), which didn't help them as they were defeated.

Hence it means something absolutely useless - usually prefaced by 'that's'.

Michael.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: pete ash on Wednesday 31 December 08 22:56 GMT (UK)
of a miserly relative my dad would remark,
 " if he was a ghost he wouldn:t give you a gliff" (fright)
  pete.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: IgorStrav on Thursday 01 January 09 18:19 GMT (UK)
For a mean person  "short arms and long pockets"

Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Olly on Friday 02 January 09 10:13 GMT (UK)
Completely useless

as much use as an a*** pocket in a vest
                          a chocolate fireguard.

Olly
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Dancing Master on Friday 02 January 09 20:12 GMT (UK)
someone mean  "as tight as a fishes bum",     which is airtight"
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: GeoffE on Friday 02 January 09 20:30 GMT (UK)
someone mean  "as tight as a fishes bum",   

I've seen a fish have a pee! :)
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: coombs on Friday 02 January 09 20:36 GMT (UK)
A wot yee druv - some Sussex dialect. I dont know what it means.

Aw yew gettin' arnn? - Norfolk speak

Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: pete edwards on Friday 02 January 09 21:08 GMT (UK)
Here in Shrewsbury, anybody that comes from the sticks sourounding us, mainly South Shropshire way,  are classed as " upper wammers " 

Pete :)
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: coombs on Monday 05 January 09 11:33 GMT (UK)
I just googled "druv" and it means driven, ie as driven to do something.

"I wont bee druv" says a Sussex farmer.

Ben
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Viktoria on Monday 05 January 09 17:22 GMT (UK)
Pete Edwards! Upper Whammers indeed!All those wonderful people - the farmers, lead miners and the Ag Labs,   especially the lead miners who feature very prominently in my family history. they walked miles to work and then a long way underground to reach the actual seam, descending and ascending by vertical ladders hundreds of feet ,then walked home and tended their smallholdings to make a reasonable standard of living and when the mine s closed they had to buy their little cottages or become homeless. It was all pretty heartless and when you think one of the largest land owners who had mining rights was The marquess of Bath!!!!!!! Well- I am very proud to be descended from such people whose health was ruined by Silicosis by the age of forty (and no compensation in those days) yet they walked miles to worship at the chapels on their one day off .There was almost no trouble in the little villages and hamlets around The Stiperstones area. They were really decent people and not  stupid either.Upper Whammers-consider yourself told off young man. Viktoria.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Ozdot on Friday 09 January 09 14:05 GMT (UK)
My husband, born in Sheffield, always said when asked by our girls what was for dinner - 'duck under the table'.
Anyone with a less than beautiful face is said to have a 'face like a bag of maggots'.
Yes, he comes out with 'sky blue pink' as well, and when the weather looks like rain - 'it's black over Bill's mothers'.
When amazed he used to say 'well I'll go to the foot of our stairs'.  (not said that for some years now after living in Oz for 40 years with no stairs).
A bit of Sheffield dialect from his father - 'don't put your dannies in your mussie'.  Which means - 'don't put your hand in your mouth'.

Keep it up chatters, I'm enjoying all the chat.

Cheers,
Dot.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Magrat on Friday 09 January 09 14:55 GMT (UK)
Words like Barley and Fainites are truce words. I can remember you also had hold up crossed fingers for them to be valid.

Information about them can be found at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Truce_terms

I remember a phrase my mother used to use when things went wrong and that was 'It makes you want to spit balls of blood'.

Magrat
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: sarahsean on Friday 09 January 09 17:24 GMT (UK)
Here in Ireland when my children want to say something is good they say it is savage, or if it is really good fierce savage,  in my day back in England it was cool.

As a southern English woman we used to say a poke in the eye with a sharp stick.

Also my husband who is Irish has never heard of the phrase poorly to say someone is ill. We saw some cards in the shop the other day with the phrase on and i told him i wasn`t the only one to use it. The reply well it is an english chain (Tesco)!

Sarah
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: cheshiremog on Saturday 10 January 09 02:39 GMT (UK)
I am always saying myself
"Well it's better than a kick in the head"
And I think that's from the South West

Although on another vein - I did have a teacher in the 1970s - who used to say in exclamation - "Well! Chase my Aunt Fanny round the static water tank!

Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: wood.mjm on Saturday 10 January 09 08:47 GMT (UK)
someone mean  "as tight as a fishes bum",     which is airtight"

Tight as a ducks ass! Watertight!

Woody.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Ozdot on Sunday 11 January 09 00:02 GMT (UK)
Yes, Woody, that duck's one is well known in our family!

I always thought 'poorly' was a Yorkshire expression, but maybe it is widespread.

The first time I visited Sheffield with OH we were in a small zoo with my in-laws when my mother in law saw a deer with a bandage around its antler.  "Oh, he's got a poorly horn" she said, and I nearly cracked up!

Cheers,
Dot.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: wood.mjm on Sunday 11 January 09 01:51 GMT (UK)

   It's horn's badly.

Woody.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: suzard on Sunday 11 January 09 02:26 GMT (UK)
Derbyshire we refer to someone being "poorly" - but if they look ill the saying is "he looks as badly as a fowl"

Suz
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Gaille on Thursday 16 April 09 21:28 BST (UK)
Here in Shrewsbury, anybody that comes from the sticks sourounding us, mainly South Shropshire way,  are classed as " upper wammers " 

Pete :)

Whooo hooo I'm an ex-upper Wammer then!
(lived by Craven Arms years back!)
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: mrs_tease on Saturday 18 April 09 21:37 BST (UK)
I use to hear

Aw go frame ya sen!  = sort yourself out

cooz is oot = cows are in the field

Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: wood.mjm on Sunday 19 April 09 02:02 BST (UK)

 Frame thissen.

Woody.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: IgorStrav on Sunday 19 April 09 15:02 BST (UK)
Was just thinking - as I was lying in bed this morning not getting up to do the chores - my mum always used to say in such circumstances

"Well, THIS won't get the baby washed"

She didn't have any babies requiring washing as far as I know.

Anything similar anywhere?
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Just Kia on Sunday 19 April 09 16:45 BST (UK)
Igor - that reminds me of a phrase my grandparents still use.
"well, this won't buy the baby a new dress" - very similar, same meaning. I think it was picked up from my grandfathers parents, so that would put it Warwickshire/Midlands
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Abiam2 on Sunday 19 April 09 17:04 BST (UK)
My dear old Dad often said, if anything surprised him "Well I'll go to the foot of our stairs!"
And if  nothing could be done about a problem "Well, that's it and all about it!"
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Mark1973 on Monday 20 April 09 12:25 BST (UK)
Was just thinking - as I was lying in bed this morning not getting up to do the chores - my mum always used to say in such circumstances

"Well, THIS won't get the baby washed"

She didn't have any babies requiring washing as far as I know.

Anything similar anywhere?

My Mun & Nan always used to say, "This wont get the Baby it's bottle".
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Roger in Sussex on Monday 20 April 09 13:23 BST (UK)
If anyone complained about meat being tough, my Mum used to say "Tougher where there isn't any".

Also, at school we used to say Paxies when asking for a truce in a rough game. I imagine it comes from the Latin pax for peace.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: BattyB on Monday 20 April 09 19:07 BST (UK)
If my mum and her sisters were talking about someone who was illegitamate they used the phrase "He/she came from across the fields"

and

if it looked like rain it was "looking black over Bill's mothers"

if a patch of blue sky appeared through clouds it was "enough to make a sailor a pair of trousers"
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: jacquelineve on Monday 20 April 09 19:39 BST (UK)
  My gran used to say about people who were nosey

"They want to know the ins and outs of an old nags a**e"

 Dogs were referred to as "wammels"

Jackie.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: James1950 on Monday 20 April 09 19:58 BST (UK)
a Burnley expression:-

She's got a face like a pair of odd clogs

James
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: stoney on Monday 20 April 09 20:23 BST (UK)
Being brought up in the Midlands near Coventry/Birmingham, by a family of Scots and Cumbrians (Carlisle) my language was a cause for hilarity - at school the odd words used for things in the family drew blank looks, and vice versa when I returned home!

Odd things from home:

"Mythering" was whining;

Searching through boxes/cupboards was termed "ratching" (or wratching? I never saw it written !);

"Whist!" - not the game, but a northern term meaning "Do be quiet!";

"Jai" (pronounced to rhyme with "my") - meaning crooked or unbalanced. (We think this word was "invented" by an aunt as no-one else in the family ever heard of or used the term!);

On the subject of funny sayings: whenever anyone commented on how hard the rain was coming down, my father would respond "Well, I'll sign the pledge when I see it going up!" - this, from a man who was practically tee-total!

Stoney
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Mark1973 on Tuesday 21 April 09 09:01 BST (UK)

Dogs were referred to as "wammels"

Jackie.


Wasps were referred to as "Wobbies" by my Nan
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: ritchiewilk on Tuesday 21 April 09 09:11 BST (UK)
When I was a lad (many moons ago) and I came in from playing and I was dirty my dad would say to me "You're as black as the earl o' hells waistcoat".

Ritchie
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Roger in Sussex on Tuesday 21 April 09 12:37 BST (UK)
Is this the place to ask if attercop is still used up North? I once used it in a poem which needed several different words for spiders, which I looked for in dictionaries. Apparently it was also used for a peevish, ill-mannered person.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: IgorStrav on Wednesday 22 April 09 21:59 BST (UK)
Hi Roger

You may get a reply here to your Attercopy query - on the other hand you could post a separate thread headed

ATTERCOP UPDATE REQUESTED

or some such.

That should get people's attention! ;D
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: cad on Wednesday 22 April 09 22:18 BST (UK)
When I bothered my Suffolk grandmother for something, she would reply "If wishes were horses, beggars would ride!"
I heard an interesting item on Radio 4 a while back that mentioned this phrase and how by changing one word and swapping two around you get a whole new meaning, think about it...
One way, "If wishes were horses, beggers would be riders"
and "If horses had wishes, riders would be beggers"
Kind of beautiful, I think.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: robbo43 on Thursday 23 April 09 00:26 BST (UK)
(Going) all round Will's mothers  - used for either talking all round a subject and not getting to the point, or taking the long way to get somewhere.

Lazy wind - strong, bitingly cold wind, ie one that was too lazy to go round you so went straight through you instead.

hodmedods - snails

Totty Fay - woman who was overdressed &/or had excessive make-up on.

Fainites or pax for a break in a chase game.

mawther - cheeky or forward girl

old boy - elderly man as opposed to a little old boy, a small male child

Robert
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: James1950 on Thursday 23 April 09 00:34 BST (UK)
Another favourite of mine was a reference to a bowlegged man who could not stop a pig in a ginnel
 :)
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Sherwood on Friday 24 April 09 23:01 BST (UK)
Mention of ginnel reminds me gunnel (both presumably derived from general as in general access).  Jitty is fairly common and the Nottingham equivalent is twitchel.

Other odds and ends I've heard from my days in Nottingham include:

A word in your shell-like (your ear)
Mardy (easily upset or sulking)
A blind man would like to see it (the job or quality of finish will do)
A gnat's (a very small measurement; in full, a gnat's boll***)
Sarnie (sandwich) for your snap (lunch) in your snap box
Cob (southerners say roll, others have balm or bap)
Shiny ar** (suit-wearing manager)
Ankle biter (baby, crawling infant)
Playing hookey, capping off (truant)
Jagging off (leaving work early when job done)
Were you born in a barn? (shut the door)
A croggy (a ride on the crossbar of a bicycle)
Mash tea then let it brew or get a brew on (suspect many variants on this)
What goes round comes round
Nesh (feel the cold more than an average person)
Rag up (clean your tools and prepare to finish the day's work)
Give it a coat of looking at (inspect a faulty item)
Bread and lard island (West Bridgford, an area south of the Trent, thought to be "posh")

Sherwood
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: robbo43 on Friday 24 April 09 23:25 BST (UK)
A couple more, bait = food and dockey = lunch - hence dockey bag, what you carried your lunch in.

Robert
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Gaille on Saturday 25 April 09 09:10 BST (UK)
Mention of ginnel reminds me gunnel (both presumably derived from general as in general access). 

You're nesh (you feel the cold more than an average person)
Sherwood


LOL At work the other day someone called one of the younger staff members "Nesh" ........... it seems theres now an age divide as well on local slang - all the younger ones didnt have a clue what it meant, those of us about 30 & over understood completely!

We have ginnels here in Manchesters - also knows as 'Backings' or 'Backies'

Riding on the crossbar of a bike was a 'crosser' when I was a kid, and sitting on the seat while the rider pedaled the bike was getting a 'Backer'

"a blind man could see that" meant something was obvious

'Pegging off' - Bunking off school

'Black as the ace of spades' meant you were filthy dirty.

Cant think of any more right now!

Gaille
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: stoney on Saturday 25 April 09 10:55 BST (UK)
My daughter spent three years in Sheffield at university - she has now accquired the term "cob" meaning to "add casually",  as in making a stew "....cob in a few carrots...."

Not sure if this is a Sheffield term or something she picked up from one of her house mates who hailed from the Wirral!


Stoney
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: AMBLY on Saturday 25 April 09 13:42 BST (UK)
If a child (especially a small one or a baby) was upset and crying/grizzling/sulking and there wasn't much of a reason to, My Granny (maybe Grandad too) would always say:

"What a pity to poocha about!?"

Always said in an exaggerated, jollying way - never cross - designed to take the mind off whatever was the matter.

Falkland Islanders also would say, "Poocha Man!" to express amazement, disbelief, or strong expression etc -  as , in "Poocha man, that was a rough night!"

I started my own, too I think (unless I've picked it up someplace I can't recall)  whenever daughter (5) asks "What are you doing?" when she cas see what I'm doing - I say "Swinging on the light singing hallelughiah". Heard her say it to her father on the phone the other day, straight face, and totally matter of fact.

Cheers
AMBLY

Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: cad on Saturday 25 April 09 20:47 BST (UK)
I'd like to throw in a few of my Mum's expressions here, she attributed them to members of her family so we're talking North Wales here...
      When Nelson gets his eye back ( in other words, never)
      I've seen more meat on Lester Piggot's whip
      I've seen more meat on a butcher's pencil
      They'd spoil another couple
      If your Aunt had balls, she'd be your uncle ( I also heard an American version of this one, if your Aunt had wheels she'd be a trolley bus)
      He couldn't stop a pig in a poke
      Face like a smacked arse
She considered many thinks to be "better than a poke in the eye with a sharp stick" but in more ribald company the stick would be coated in something more offensive that rhymed with gritty!
If we kid's were in a "can I have" mood we were told to stop mythering.
Poking around nooks and crannies for treasure was mooching
If you couldn't go out without a coat on, you were nesh.
Also being from Shropshire, the phrase "all around the Wrekin" is one I'm familiar with although I was gobsmacked the first time I heard a Brummie use it, as I had often had to explain to them where Shropshire was and whenever I address a Brummie with "Ow bist kid?" they think I'm speaking German!!
     
     
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: IgorStrav on Tuesday 05 May 09 22:13 BST (UK)
Love those, Cad!

I just thought of one my mum used to say, after a particularly tiring day out......

" Home, James, and don't spare the horses!"

and another one, which is related to an old comic song, and both my parents used to say, a propos of nothing:

"You can tell a man what boozes by the company he chooses"
And the pig got up, and slowly walked away.


And I suppose nobody here knows the tale which starts

"There's a firm in the Strand called Twinings, Tea Merchants and Bankers.  Old Mr Twining had three sons........."
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Paul on Tuesday 05 May 09 22:40 BST (UK)
Having to do something you'd rather not do. 'I'd rather have me a**e rubbed with a brick'

Paul
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: chirp on Wednesday 06 May 09 11:35 BST (UK)
Up here in Eastern Scotland your packed lunch or sandwich is a "piece" and you carry it in your "piece poke".  I'm told this comes from the time when it was common to take a portion of cold solidified porridge for your midday meal.  Also an expression which I heard when I moved up here, and I hadn't come across for many years since my childhood in Manchester, was going for your "messages" meaning going shopping. A cold biting wind is a "snell wind". If someone is looking miserable, ie with a long face, it can be said that "his face is trippin' him". To cry or weep is "to greet".
Chirp
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Treetotal on Wednesday 06 May 09 19:28 BST (UK)
I wish I had a pound for every time my Mum said..."Be careful...you'll have sombody's eye out with that"... ;D ;D ;D ;D
Carol
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Subaru on Friday 08 May 09 11:14 BST (UK)
'She's got a face like bad fat'  - somebody who is in a mood!!

or

'She's got a face like a bulldog chewing a wasp' - not the prettiest of faces!!

Rosemary
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Deb D on Friday 08 May 09 11:35 BST (UK)
From downunder: - some of these may be variations on sayings brought over by our ancestors?  Some of them also seem to have different meanings, depending on where they're heard.

"Born in a paddock with the sliprails down" (= Close the door!)

"Got a 'roo loose in the top paddock" (= crazy)

"The elevator doesn't go all the way to the penthouse"  (*ditto*)

"Don't come the raw prawn!" (= "Don't lie to me")

"Flat out like a lizard drinking" (* the meaning of this varies: - sometimes it means really busy, and other times it means bludging instead of working *)

"Mad as a cut snake" (= Really angry)

"More paint than a battleship needs, and enough powder to blow it up" (*that one's pretty obvious, I think*)

"If his brains were dynamite, he wouldn't have enough to blow his hat off"

And .. the mother of a friend of mine used to say, when asked what was for dinner .... "Pig's bum and booligum".  I've never found out what booligum was.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: dsjturner on Friday 08 May 09 12:34 BST (UK)

"Born in a paddock with the sliprails down" (= Close the door!)
Where i'm from, the south east, we usually ask "were you born in a barn?" if someone leaves the door open!
My dad, a Londoner, always says' It's better than a kick in the teeth!"
We use the already mentioned sayings for being hungry but we still say quite a rude version for being thirsty! It's very rude I warn you but we say "oh i've got a mouth like a nun's....."
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: lesleyhannah on Friday 08 May 09 12:56 BST (UK)

My Nan (from Hull) when asked what was for tea always replied 'S*** with sugar on'.

Another expression that used to puzzle me as a kid, was, when she didn't believe what we were saying was 'that's all my eye and Peggy Martin'.

And if I'd been naughty I'd be threatened with 'Icky the Firebobby' - whoever he was!
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: mother25 on Friday 08 May 09 19:00 BST (UK)
When someone knocked at the door and a person indoors would say 'Who's that' before opening the door. The reply would be Icky the Firebobby!!

We also heard All my eye and Betty Martin, meaning something wasn't quite true.

She's all fur coat and no knickers  :o meant someone was putting on a front...trying to be something they weren't.

No better than she ought to be meant a girl who had low morals  :o

Twopence short of a shilling...not quite sane  :D

He's got all his chairs at home meant he knew what was what
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: mother25 on Friday 08 May 09 19:24 BST (UK)
Something a family friend used to say was 'Old Timer's Disease'  she meant Alzheimer's disease of course  ;D

I think that's called a Malapropism though rather than a family saying.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: nort on Friday 08 May 09 20:35 BST (UK)
here's a one
when going into a dark room "you can't see a bat's eye" !!! ;D ;D
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Paul on Friday 08 May 09 23:21 BST (UK)
here's a one
when going into a dark room "you can't see a bat's eye" !!! ;D ;D

Or it was as black as a coal heavers armpit :P

Paul.

Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Cully1418 on Friday 08 May 09 23:32 BST (UK)
A few years ago I took my place in the family line up for my grandad's birthday photo.  Grandad came out with "You wouldn't stop a pig in a passage" - a reference to the fact that I am somewhat bow legged! Bless him!
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Ozdot on Sunday 10 May 09 15:18 BST (UK)
More from my husband - born in Sheffield -

"She's got Face On"  (usually when someone is in a bad mood or sulking etc)
"Nesh" this one has been on here I see (feels the cold and complains about it)
"Mardy" (someone who whines ALL the time about nothing)

My father-in-law said to our elder daughter when she was only a toddler (much to my mother-in-law's disgust) "Don't put your dannies in your mussie" .  Meaning, I think, keep your hands out of your mouth.

Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: mother25 on Sunday 10 May 09 18:24 BST (UK)
I think being nesh must be a northern thing, because I recall it from my childhood in Liverpool and my late hubby knew it from his childhood in Manchester, but when we moved South nobody seemed aware of it  ???

If we asked 'what's for dinner' my mum would often say 'A run round the table 'til you're fed up'  meaning there wasn't much available   :(

If there were black clouds in the distance, my gran would say 'It's stormy over Fred's mother's'   No idea who Fred was or his mother  ;D

I wonder what our children/grandchildren will remember about us  :)
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Treetotal on Sunday 10 May 09 18:28 BST (UK)
Never heard of "Nesh" before  ??? ..interesting...on the subject of dinner...if we asked what we were having my Mum would say "If-fit"...If it goes round the table you get a bit  ;D
Carol
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: liverpool lass on Sunday 10 May 09 19:15 BST (UK)
Here are a few scouse sayings;

to give someone 'down the banks' meant a good telling off.
 Someone was 'gammy handed' or 'cack handed' if they were left handed.
a 'gezzunder' was a chamber pot cos it goes under the bed
'Gorra cob on' in a bad mood.
S/He was 'made up' meaning very pleased.
Its 'cracking the flags' meaning its very hot -flags being flagstones or pavement.
'carry out' packed lunch
'muck in, yer at yer Grannies' Bon Appetite!
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Treetotal on Sunday 10 May 09 19:21 BST (UK)
Nice one L.L...I'm a left hander and was called..."Cack-Handed" or "Golly-Handed"...we also had a Gazunder....so called because it "Goes under the bed"...cracking the flags is a new one to me though.. I have heard of the rest 8)
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: mother25 on Sunday 10 May 09 19:51 BST (UK)
Here are a few scouse sayings;

to give someone 'down the banks' meant a good telling off.
 Someone was 'gammy handed' or 'cack handed' if they were left handed.
a 'gezzunder' was a chamber pot cos it goes under the bed
'Gorra cob on' in a bad mood.
S/He was 'made up' meaning very pleased.
Its 'cracking the flags' meaning its very hot -flags being flagstones or pavement.
'carry out' packed lunch
'muck in, yer at yer Grannies' Bon Appetite!


These take me right back to my Liverpool childhood, although I have to admit I'd forgotten some of them  ;) 
'Cum 'ed our kid' ....come along or come on then usually to make a smaller child hurry up  ;D
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Viktoria on Sunday 10 May 09 20:24 BST (UK)
Of a courting couple neither of whom were very nice looking ," best they `re together then neither of`um ull spoil another pair " Viktoria.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: mother25 on Sunday 10 May 09 20:42 BST (UK)
Love that Viktoria  ;D 
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: cad on Sunday 10 May 09 23:59 BST (UK)
I mentioned in my earlier post that my mum used to say "they'd spoil another couple" although she'd use it to describe a pair who were nutty rather than ugly, or a couple who deserved each other, I think we all know what that means!

Mum was also one for spoonerisms, our cars were always old bangers and one day when Dad came home with a Moggy Miner, she announced that we should hang on to this one as one day it would be a "colliters ectum", this became a family saying.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: cad on Monday 11 May 09 00:17 BST (UK)
Although I've heard cack-handed means left-handed, I've always used it to mean clumsy, in fact I called His Nibs that only today! I think it's because cack means crap in Welsh, at least according to my Granddad it does!

Granddad was from that generation of Welsh whose parents actively discouraged their children from learning the language even though it was their own first language.
Great-Granddad used to say "I speak three spokes, English, Welsh and rubbish".

Apart from cack and the usual Welsh everyone knows, the only other Welsh that crept into his vocabulary was "wedi mynd", used when something was unfixable. Mum told me it meant "gone west" actually wedi means past and mynd means go, does that mean the Long Mynd in Shropshire is Long Gone? !!
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Eyesee on Thursday 14 May 09 02:45 BST (UK)
Growing up here in NZ in the 60s used to here some of those expressions, particularly from my maternal grandparents.

When asking what was for dinner you would get told 'Dimplets", which meant S**t with sugar on usually .

'Mad as a meat axe' was another one

My paternal grandfather had one expression 'Silly as a two-bob watch'

Ian C
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: mother25 on Thursday 14 May 09 11:58 BST (UK)
This reminded me of another family saying.....
about as genuine as a 9 bob note...meaning someone was not as sincere as they appeared to be, and used in the days of 10/- notes of course. Only those of us of a certain age will know what I mean  ;)

 
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Mark1973 on Thursday 14 May 09 15:17 BST (UK)
Bent as a nine bob note was the one i always used to hear

When i used to complain about being bored my Mum would always say sarcasticly "What do you want, a song & dance"
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Deb D on Thursday 14 May 09 15:20 BST (UK)
"Sharp as a bowling ball"

"A few tinnies short of a slab"  (tinny = can of beer, slab = case of beer, us. 12 or 24 cans)

(When playing cards) "I've got a hand like a foot"
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Subaru on Friday 15 May 09 08:32 BST (UK)
My mam used to say I had 'more clothes than soft Mick' when I was younger.  Not the case now - not up-to-date anyway, I tend to recycle nowadays :)

Who is Soft Mick anyway?

Rosemary
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: IrishOrigins on Friday 15 May 09 09:09 BST (UK)
That face would curdle cream!!

The lights are on but nobody's home.

A few pennies short of a quid.

Just like Mulligan's dog - when we had something but didn't want to share.  (But who is Mulligan?)

Mad as a two bob watch

When we asked "what's that"? the answer was often "a wigwom for a goose's bridle" 

When it was something strange that nobody recognized the answer was "a dingus"

For something the wrong way round - a**se about face

"What's for dinner?"  - Bread and duck under the table

Fizzle - to describe someone who didn't have a very happy expression (and I have no idea where that came from)

If the wind changes your face will stay like that!!

And one of the most annoying memories from my childhood is when I asked Mum if I could (whatever) she would say "We'll see".  That could go on for days!!!!!!!!!!!

Alternatively - ask your father, who would then say "ask your mother" - grrrr

Probably many more, but that's all I can think of at the moment.

Philippa



Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: rancegal on Monday 18 May 09 18:41 BST (UK)
I think perhaps 'fizzle' comes from 'fizog', which is short for Physiognomy (something about studying faces)
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: IrishOrigins on Monday 18 May 09 19:50 BST (UK)
Well that certainly triggered a memory and I think you could be right.

There was one person Mum used to refer to as "FizzGig" and that was later shortened to Fizzle!!! 

An easy step from one to the other, I think.

 :D

Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: BevL on Tuesday 19 May 09 07:48 BST (UK)
Some more as most of what I remember has already been told: 
Freeze the b**lls of a brass monkey
Don't get your knickers in a knot
the inevitable in answer to why? Why is a crooked letter and can't be made straight
Mutton done up as lamb
Bev


Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Eddo on Saturday 27 June 09 13:21 BST (UK)
Hi, I've got a couple for you.
"Thick as two bricks"
"A sandwich short of a picnic"
"As useful as a pocket on a singlet"
"As useful as teats on a bull"
Responding to 'how do you feel' - "Like three penneth of Gawd help us"
I could go on and on, as I had an Uncle who spoke mainly in ozzie slang, and we just had to try and keep up.
Eddo
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Geoff-E on Saturday 27 June 09 14:20 BST (UK)
There was one person Mum used to refer to as "FizzGig" and that was later shortened to Fizzle!!! 

Fizgig: a frivolous or flirtatious girl (Collins English Dictionary)
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: mother25 on Saturday 27 June 09 15:55 BST (UK)
I'm now reminded of a couple more.....

When talking about someone who was mean with cash.....
There's no pockets in shrouds or You can't take it with you!

And recently a friend wasn't at all well. When I phoned to ask what was wrong she replied 'Oh I've got 'there's a lot of it about'   ;D

Love these sayings  ;D
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Lydart on Saturday 27 June 09 21:04 BST (UK)
There was the one I learned when I lived for a year in deepest Suffolk ...

'She's so mean she'd lick a tanner from a tad'


... a tad being a cow-pat !
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: BevL on Sunday 28 June 09 07:39 BST (UK)
Hope it hasn't been done before. 
Long pockets - short arms!
Bev
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: buddha on Sunday 28 June 09 07:58 BST (UK)
Don,t know if these have been done before but.    Got a dab on.  meaning you are very hot.  As much use as a chocolate fireguard. (useless)
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: IrishOrigins on Sunday 28 June 09 08:46 BST (UK)
Love this thread - it makes me laugh a lot.

Geoff-E - my mother was so good at making up words to fit both people and situations that I would never have thought to check up one of her "specials" in a dictionary.  Just goes to show I should not doubt everything she ever said. :D

Another favourite - if brains were ink there wouldn't be enough there for a full stop!!!!

Philippa
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: mother25 on Sunday 28 June 09 17:05 BST (UK)
I've spent the afternoon with some very good friends, one of whom has recently had a new kitchen and bathroom installed. She is also having her front drive re-laid, so naturally enough we spoke about the cost of it all. She replied 'Hang the expense, throw the cat another kipper'  ;D  I haven't heard that for a very long time.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: buddha on Monday 29 June 09 11:55 BST (UK)
For someone who is very clever:   He (she) could tell you the square root of a bicuit tin but wouldn,t know how to get into it.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Billy Anderson on Monday 29 June 09 12:19 BST (UK)
There naebody in but the fire and it,s oot.
An Isobar short of a weather chart.
Fur coat and nae drawers.
2 vouchers short of a pop up toaster.
If the wind changes you will be left wae a face like that.
If a don,t see you soon ahll see you through the windae.(window)
You would cause a fight in an empty house.
(Glasgow childhood.)
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: julianb on Tuesday 30 June 09 20:58 BST (UK)
This is fun  ;D    Let's hope these phrases can survive  ::)

Apologies if someone's covered this, but I remember (South London) my parents using "not as green as he's cabbage-looking" - meaning cleverer than you think.

In London, I remember working alongside a quite refined australian woman (a semi-professional opera singer).  Occasionally she would come out with some uncharasteristic belters which didn't need any explanation:

My mouth's as dry as an arab's sandal

Made the hairs on your chest crack like stock whips!


Keep 'em coming

JULIAN

Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Paul on Tuesday 30 June 09 22:39 BST (UK)
Moto GP commentator Charlie Cox describing the inclement weather.

This wind's strong enough to blow a dog of It's chain ;D ;D

Paul.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: wifeywebb on Wednesday 01 July 09 20:07 BST (UK)
My Mum and I have had a good giggle over this thread - it's great!!

A little one of from Wilts?? It's been used in the village I grew up in for as long as I can remember, but does get some confused looks now

Anywhen - any time, (come round anywhen)
Anywhere - where ever (it could be anywhere)

Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: mother25 on Wednesday 01 July 09 21:52 BST (UK)
Yes, I have a friend who was born near Corfe Castle and 'anywhen ' was a standard reply from her  :)
Love this thread, it tells us a lot about local areas and the language used by our ancestors that has continued over the years.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: danuslave on Wednesday 01 July 09 22:26 BST (UK)
A few more

going all round the five fields - not taking the direct route

furkle (possibly Bristolian) - poking around looking for something

four fifths of bugger-all - self explanatory! (and that one is within the last 10 years)

going arse over tip - to fall over  (used by my grandmother who came from Co Durham)

black's white and yeller's nae colour  (same grandmother) - not quite sure what this meant.  Any offers?

This thread could go on forever - I hope
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: cuthie on Saturday 04 July 09 20:45 BST (UK)
He/She is well-oiled (West Scotland expression for pretty drunk)

If ye don't stop that girnin (crying) I'll take you up the nearest close and you'll get something to girn about.   Happy to say that threat was never carried out.

Would you put that bit of wood in that hole (Mother asking someone to close the door

When very thirsty my Mother in law used to say she couldn't spit sixpence (W.Midlands)

Cuthie
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: fallingonabruise on Monday 06 July 09 23:28 BST (UK)
I'm from west yorkshire and use these regularly,

frame y'sen   -   get on with it/make an effort

framing like a man wi no arms   -   you are useless

sat there like cheese at fourpence   -    not moving

i can't get on for getting off      -   i keep getting interrupted

wan a mi arse    -   useless (i have no idea what i'm actually saying, but  ?)

you don't know your arse from your elbow    - you are talking rubbish

you could ride bare arsed to china on that    --     your knife is blunt

 ;)
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: IgorStrav on Tuesday 07 July 09 21:37 BST (UK)
This one could run and run!

Some really great sayings

Do you remember, when young, people used to write a series of letters on the back of an envelope to convey a secret message to a loved one.

I know many of them were famously a little ......well, you know what I mean, but I always loved this one

YTTDFATCCSH















Yours Till The Deserts Freeze And The Camels Come Skating Home.


aaaaaaah
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: mother25 on Tuesday 07 July 09 21:42 BST (UK)
Oh yes I remember those days  ;D

My hubby (then boyfriend) was in the RAF and we used to write every day. The back of our envelopes always carried the initials S W A L K....




Sealed With A Loving Kiss....how sweet was that  ;)
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: BevL on Wednesday 08 July 09 03:06 BST (UK)
Another one from my mother -
You are going so fast, you'll meet yourself coming back!
Bev
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: BevL on Friday 17 July 09 08:32 BST (UK)
Just found it again ..
You'll need a packed lunch and a water bag   ..  (going a long way)
Bev
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: IgorStrav on Friday 17 July 09 23:29 BST (UK)
Another one from my mother -
You are going so fast, you'll meet yourself coming back!
Bev

Similar to this.....

my parents always used to say of someone quick witted that they were

"all there, and halfway back"

Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Billy Anderson on Sunday 19 July 09 11:37 BST (UK)
aw there an a dod mair
all there and a bit more=clever
(Glasgow)
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Della Crow on Sunday 19 July 09 14:14 BST (UK)
God willing and the crick don't rise   - Meaning if at all possible (crick is how we say creek in the south   :) ).
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Dancing dolly on Friday 24 July 09 15:53 BST (UK)
I have really enjoyed reading the local expressions.
Here are some from my Liverpool, Irish, Mum.
 
Hands like shovels and feet like ferry boats.

A voice like a fog horn on the Mersey

So tight he wouldn't give you last night's Echo.

Dressed up like a dog's dinner.

Someone had a face that would frighten the cows.

A face so long it would trip them.

Muscles like knots in cotton.

Someone who was known as very light fingered.... He would take the eyes out of your head and come back and spit in the sockets.

Someone who was very happy was said to be like a dog with two tails or two d---s.

When I asked for anything she would say, "when Dick docks". I don't know who Dick was.

 I'll buy you two in case one makes you sick. or most annoying "I will knit you one."

When I didn't listen....I'll put you in a corner with your ears tied back. ...She never did.

By the way Dancing Dolly was part of a song she used to sing. I think it was a skipping rhyme.

Dancing Dolly had no sense,
She bought three eggs for eighteen pence,
The eggs were bad, Dolly went mad,
Pit, pat, pepper.

Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: heywood on Friday 24 July 09 16:19 BST (UK)
I've spent the afternoon with some very good friends, one of whom has recently had a new kitchen and bathroom installed. She is also having her front drive re-laid, so naturally enough we spoke about the cost of it all. She replied 'Hang the expense, throw the cat another kipper'  ;D  I haven't heard that for a very long time.


Mother25 - that's one of my husband's.  ;D

We went to a play last week at our local theatre - the play was based in Lancashire in 1920s.
The young wife was about to give birth and after the interval when we returned to our seat, I automatically said 'Oh they've brought the bed down'.
Flashback to youth, when in our 2 up-2 down houses, the bed being brought downstairs meant serious illness or similar.
heywood
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: mother25 on Friday 24 July 09 16:30 BST (UK)
Yes indeed, heywood.  The only proper memory I have of my grand-dad is of an old man in bed in the corner of the front room. As he was only 42 years of age when he died, he obviously wasn't old at all, but he had cancer so I suppose that aged him, and I was only 3 myself  ;)
When my mum burned her leg from sitting too close to the fire, the bed was brought down so she could rest as much as possible, as she still had 4 children to see to  :o  As a child she had Infantile Paralysis (Polio) and had no feeling in the affected leg at all, hence she had no idea her leg was so badly burned  :(
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: heywood on Friday 24 July 09 16:33 BST (UK)
oh...memories.
The front room became my grandad's bedroom but he was in his 80s then unlike your poor grandfather.

I could just hear neighbours saying,' they've had to bring the bed down..' when I saw that and obviously haven't thought of it for years.  ;)
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: netgrrl79 on Friday 24 July 09 16:34 BST (UK)
Stop that skriking or you'll get some at to skrik for..

Liverpool has always had its own words totally different for the rest of Lancashire.   Where we would say grandma  it was Nin  in common usage in Liverpool I believe this is from the Welsh families who settled there.

Just read through the thread and found this one didn't have answers - never heard skriking or Nin (I live in North East Wales, about 40 miles from Liverpool) but I'd guess skriking might come from sgrechian (Welsh - to shriek/scream) and Nain is North Welsh dialect for grandmother.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: heywood on Friday 24 July 09 16:37 BST (UK)
I'm from Oldham and you can still hear 'skrike' used for crying /screaming.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Geoff-E on Friday 24 July 09 16:52 BST (UK)
Do you remember, when young, people used to write a series of letters on the back of an envelope to convey a secret message to a loved one.

There are a couple of those in this Alan Bennett sketch http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lUDxnkIPAh8
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: IgorStrav on Friday 24 July 09 17:16 BST (UK)
Yes, I remember N O R W I C H  ;) ;D
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: cad on Tuesday 28 July 09 21:25 BST (UK)
Thought you might like these, culled from A.E Jenkin's book on life in Titterstone and the Clee Hills, Shropshire, "Everyday Life Industrial History and Dialect"

E annu got a bit a mat on him - He's very thin
Sur/re int e norru gutid - Good gracious isn't he thin. (narrow gutted, love that)
Sur/re, the assnu of got sum chollop - Good gracious you've got plenty to say for yourself
Gis a cherper - give us a kiss
There the bist the sist - there you are you see

So lung fer now!
cad

Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Viktoria on Tuesday 28 July 09 22:54 BST (UK)
Oh Cad you have brought back memories- I can remember round the Stiperstones area people always said  "How bist you?" for "how are you?"                                                                                   All negative word such as couldn`t ,wouldn`t, hadn`t and shouldn`t,didn`t,were ---Couldna, wouldna, hadna, shouldna , didna, . To say someone is not becomes--- isna----  " Her isna gonna  town today" ie "She is not going to town today"" Her anna got much money"ie "she has not got much money"The answer Yes to a question was always "ah."" I Don`t think so "became " I dunna think so"I don`t know why I said was, it still is." I dare not "   is  "" I dursent" > You jogged my memory very pleasantly. Thanks .Viktoria.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: cad on Tuesday 28 July 09 23:34 BST (UK)
Thanks Viktoria, glad to be of service, if you haven't already you should read Mary Webb, especially The Prescious Bane or Gone to Earth (which is based in the Stiperstones area), I think you'd enjoy them.
Lissum, meaning lithe is still my favourite Shropshire word.
Cad
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Viktoria on Wednesday 29 July 09 00:11 BST (UK)
Thanks cad, I have read all Mary Webb`s books and was there when "Gone to Earth" was filmed up at Lord`shill Chapel above Snailbeach. I met most of the stars except the one I was dying to meet---David  Farrar. He was exactly like I imagined Jack Rreddin to be.That was superb casting but I thought Jennifer Jones was mis-cast.Many of my friends and neighbours were extras in the film and one relative .I had gone back home to be with my parents after being evacuated to relatives of my paternal grandmother but always went back  to Snailbeach for my long school holidays and it coincided with the filming. Such lovely music by Eric Eastham.I have a copy of the film which was sold at the pub at The Stiperstones after a programe had been made and filmed about the making of G.T.E.The scenery is breathtaking.. Her stories are a bit maudlin and mawkish so much so that Stella Gibbons wrote "Cold Comfort Farm"as an antidote!,
Mary Webb tried I think to write as Thomas Hardy did and whilst she did not have his genius never-the -less she had a great insight into human nature.After Squire Reddin has seduced Hazel and she is having his baby he decides he may as well get married, (he`s getting on a bit and there should be an heir for "Undern", )as if he`s doing her a huge favour, M.W. writes " and he never understood just exactly what he had done"That`s my favourite of all her books and to know that one tree is mentioned in it which is still growing at Lord`shill is amazing to me, having relatives buried there. But thanks very much , had I not known about the books I would have been pleased you were kind enough to mention them to me. Viktoria.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: cad on Wednesday 29 July 09 00:53 BST (UK)
Wow Viktoria,
I remember when growing up we would laugh our faces off watching that film on the telly, everytime it came on!! Especially that chase scene at the end where she chases her fox the length and breadth of shropshire whilst chased by the hunt, one minute it's the meres the next it's Caer Caradoc! How guilty I felt when I discovered the films of Michael Powell a few years later, all classics. It's also remarkable for being filmed in the original setting of the book, how many other novels filmed at that time got such respect?
Here's some more pillaged from the book..

Look at that od Kov/i
Int e a klink/er?
Dunt our Tum minse is fit/tl
Dust/nu want a nog/gin a chas?

Maybe I don't need to translate!
here's me slopin off
cad
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Viktoria on Wednesday 29 July 09 01:31 BST (UK)
Do you know "The Callow" that is Bromlow Callow> The ring of trees at the top was getting a bit thin and there has been some re-planting. I asked my uncle once why was it there- he said during the first world war the whole hill was covered with trees and the landowner sold them or was forced to sell them to The War Dept. for use as trench supports and pit props when there was a lot of tunnelling under the German lines. Sadly his son was killed just before the hill was totally cleared and he asked that the crown of trees should be left as a memorial to his son. I have mentioned that from time to time but no-one seems to have heard it . I suppose the land owner could be identified and if he lost a son. If it is a memorial it`s a lovely one  being a distinct landmark for miles and miles and therefore such a pity the young man`s name has entered  oblivion. Pity I didn`t ask.Viktoria.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: cad on Wednesday 29 July 09 17:39 BST (UK)
Hi Viktoria,
Interesting story, not one I'd heard before but my old stomping ground was the Ironbridge area and when I googled Bromlow Callow I recognised the view immediately from car journeys. I have a book called Trees of Shropshire by Andrew Morton, I was convinced such a notable landmark would be in that, alas not. There is a mention in Michael Raven's excellant Shropshire Gazeteer...
"It catches the eye for many miles around. Turn a corner and there it is, the distinctive clump of pine trees on the hill called Bromlow Callow. It was originally planted, it is said, as a drover's landmark and we are quite prepared to believe it. Bromlow means 'the broom covered hill', and Callow is from the Old English calu, meaning 'bald' and hence 'bare'. It is a very scattered community in a country of small hills and dales."
It would seem that the hill has born it's little pine toupee for a good deal longer than your uncle's story suggests. Such a detailed story though, I wonder if it applies to a differant clump of trees, would pine even be suitable for use in tunnels
Gone off topic here so I'll sign off with a few more words...

Woont - mole
wolet - owl
blaw - blossom
choober  or  choob/bin/kez - football
dan/di/pats - slippers
donni - hand
golden chan - laburnum
granch - chew noisily
klet - having no money
must quit me larrup now,
cad

Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Viktoria on Wednesday 29 July 09 19:54 BST (UK)
Hi cad I suspect your story may be the true one as no-one else I have asked knows the one uncle told me .Bromlow callow was "Hunter`s Spinney" in G.T.E.
Try to get a book called "Never on a Sunday", a delightful read full of local expressions from the Stiperstones district.
To get back on topic, here in the North of England people say "He`ll have your guts for garters"---You are in deep trouble with someone.
Ast a bin agate?--have you been out and about
Art throng?---are you very busy?
Art reet?---are you alright?, a way of saying hello.
If you offer to help someone and they don`t want it,they`ll say "your reet, ie no need to bother..
                                                                                                      Cheerio. Viktoria.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Gaille on Friday 07 August 09 10:43 BST (UK)
I'm from Oldham and you can still hear 'skrike' used for crying /screaming.

LOL I was just about to post the exact same thing, hello fellow Oldhamer!

My dad told my Nephew to quit Skriking yesterday cos he was being a mardy & crying every 2 inutes for no reason (Mardy = softie/baby around here)
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Billy Anderson on Saturday 08 August 09 02:21 BST (UK)
Hi all,
Do we have here before us the first Rootschat ' hand book' to Local expressions!
It is fascinating reading ,keep them coming.
Billy.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: FosseWay on Monday 20 September 10 13:31 BST (UK)
Someone mentioned 'It looks black over Bill's mother's' -- that's Black Country as far as I know. From the same neck of the woods (where I grew up), there's a wealth of expressions that use the verb 'bost' (cognate with Standard English 'burst', I think):

bost as a verb (simple past and past participle also bost) = break, as in "Yow've bost it", "It day work, it's bost", "Gerron with it or Oi'll bost yer 'ed"
bostin as a present participle/adjective = excellent, very good
bost off as a verb = move quickly, get a move on

The latter in particular tends to be misinterpreted by people from elsewhere -- it's not a synonym for various other four-letter words followed by 'off', meaning 'get lost'; you might say to a driver who's sitting at a green light "Goo on, bost off!", meaning "Get on with it!" rather than anything stronger.

And you might call the dozy driver saft (= soft in the head) if he doesn't bost off to your satisfaction.  :)
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: suzard on Monday 20 September 10 16:20 BST (UK)
Derbyshire

"bost" = burst

I'm fit to bost =I'm very full

Suz
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: IgorStrav on Saturday 25 September 10 14:27 BST (UK)
I'd forgotten this thread, a great re-read, such interesting local expressions.

I remember an old lady of my acquaintance who had a simple reply when asked the question why? (particularly by a child) to which she either didn't know the answer, or didn't want to give it - she used to say

"because which."

Can't do much with that one.   :D
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Viktoria on Saturday 25 September 10 20:10 BST (UK)
I remember a saying---- rather unkind really--- used  by neighbours when an engaged couple, neither of whom  were particularly attractive came into view  . " Ah well, at least neither of them will spoil another pair".
It`s really cruel isn`t it!!     Viktoria.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: anitamo on Sunday 26 September 10 15:26 BST (UK)
What a funny thread, I have just read the lot.  ;D

I remember so many of my grandparents sayings things like:-

Tha rattles like a can o'mabs.... you rattle like a can of marbles.... meaning you talk too much/too loudly

She's got a face like the back end of a tram smash

Sit on that cold step and you'll get kill cough!!
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: joanna69 on Thursday 30 September 10 23:48 BST (UK)
I'm from Dorset.  if you leave a door open when leaving a room (so letting in a draft) you get accused thus:  "Close the door, anyone would think you were born in Bridport!" or "what were you? Born in Bridport?" (said in broad Dorset accent of course ;D )

I have NO idea why being born in Bridport should mean you are likely to leave doors open!!

A jasper or waps is a wasp...
Shrammed is being really cold.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: billramp on Friday 01 October 10 01:46 BST (UK)
Yes  'bost' is used in an old potteries saying......

"Cos chuck a bow aggen a woe, yed it, kick it an bost it!"

When it is said it is much more difficult to understand.!!!

Any ideas......I'll give the answer later!

Also I always understood the Bill in 'Black over bill's mothers's" referred to William Shakespeare

Bill


Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: billramp on Friday 01 October 10 03:27 BST (UK)
Just put last post on here and what should be on Radio 5 live now but phone in with the etymologist about phrases and expressions
spooky??

Bill
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: Viktoria on Friday 01 October 10 19:16 BST (UK)
Chuck a ball against a wall, head it ,kick it and boot it---- is this anything like? Viktoria.
Title: Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
Post by: nort on Friday 01 October 10 21:28 BST (UK)
what about these,they make me smile

he'll neither work nor want- he's a bit lazy

he wouldn't work in a iron lung - he's a bit lazy

give iz a shuggy - push me on the swing

give iz sum scranchims - when ordering fish n chips

i think i'll have a plodge - when at the seaside

i am up to me oxters - the snows a bit deep