RootsChat.Com

General => The Common Room => The Lighter Side => Topic started by: Spidermonkey on Monday 08 June 20 14:59 BST (UK)

Title: Damned with feint praise?????
Post by: Spidermonkey on Monday 08 June 20 14:59 BST (UK)
I've been rummaging through some newspaper articles online, and came across this death notice today.  I'm not certain that it is phrased with entirely the right words.........  If there has been a change of use of the word deplored, then I would be very interested!
Title: Re: Damned with feint praise?????
Post by: Mike in Cumbria on Monday 08 June 20 15:02 BST (UK)
I've been rummaging through some newspaper articles online, and came across this death notice today.  I'm not certain that it is phrased with entirely the right words.........  If there has been a change of use of the word deplored, then I would be very interested!
It does look odd, doesn't it? A google search shows up similar usages, so I don't think it was a mistake.

“His loss is deeply deplored, as he was immensely popular.”


de·plore  (dĭ-plôr′)
tr.v. de·plored, de·plor·ing, de·plores
1. To feel or express strong disapproval of; condemn: "Somehow we had to master events, not simply deplore them" (Henry A. Kissinger).
2. To express sorrow or grief over.
3. To regret; bemoan.

Title: Re: Damned with feint praise?????
Post by: Erato on Monday 08 June 20 15:04 BST (UK)
I think it was used as a synonym for lament.
Title: Re: Damned with feint praise?????
Post by: Spidermonkey on Monday 08 June 20 15:09 BST (UK)
The death is reported with the same phrasing in both of the local newspapers - making it far less likely to have been a mistaken phrase.  Would there have been a word limit to the death notices, so the phrase "deeply deplored" became shorthand for "we feel a lot of grief and sorrow at the loss of our loved one"?
Title: Re: Damned with feint praise?????
Post by: antiquesam on Monday 08 June 20 15:21 BST (UK)
If I remember correctly you paid a charge for the first few words in the classified section and then by each additional word, so in a similar way to telegrams, people were very often economical with their use of words.
Title: Re: Damned with feint praise?????
Post by: stanmapstone on Monday 08 June 20 15:56 BST (UK)
From the OED
Deplored;  Lamented, mourned for.
Deplore; To weep for, bewail, lament; to grieve over, regret deeply.
Stan
Title: Re: Damned with feint praise?????
Post by: rjknott on Monday 08 June 20 17:53 BST (UK)
There is a similar monument in our local church where it says that X was 'deeply regretted by all who knew him'.

Richard
Title: Re: Damned with feint praise?????
Post by: Spidermonkey on Tuesday 09 June 20 08:29 BST (UK)
Thank you for your contributions too, AntiqueSam, Stan and Richard.  I find it fascinating how language evolves and develops.
Title: Re: Damned with feint praise?????
Post by: BumbleB on Tuesday 09 June 20 08:38 BST (UK)
Surely the word "deplored" relates to the instance of "death", rather than the person.  The same would apply to "deeply regretted by all who knew her".