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General => The Common Room => Topic started by: chiddicks on Sunday 28 June 20 05:37 BST (UK)

Title: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: chiddicks on Sunday 28 June 20 05:37 BST (UK)
My half yearly report, so how did I do???


​​​​​​​https://chiddicksfamilytree.com/2020/06/28/my-half-yearly-report-how-did-i-do/
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: guest189040 on Friday 03 July 20 11:17 BST (UK)
Interesting.

Pleased that what you are doing works for you, I can certainly see that an organised logical flow to the research has benefitted yourself.

I applied a more logical process to my own DNA hints and have expanded my tree considerably to include all those that Ancestry has hinted as having a Common Ancestor, except for one.  I have had zero success where no trees have been produced and zi have adopted the mantra, if they cannot be bothered to research their own family then I am not going to waste my time searching for them.

Research does throw curveballs and plans then go out the window and a new line of research opens up, this has certainly happened to me.

Anyway, it was good to read your write up.
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: chiddicks on Friday 03 July 20 21:15 BST (UK)
Interesting.

Pleased that what you are doing works for you, I can certainly see that an organised logical flow to the research has benefitted yourself.

I applied a more logical process to my own DNA hints and have expanded my tree considerably to include all those that Ancestry has hinted as having a Common Ancestor, except for one.  I have had zero success where no trees have been produced and zi have adopted the mantra, if they cannot be bothered to research their own family then I am not going to waste my time searching for them.

Research does throw curveballs and plans then go out the window and a new line of research opens up, this has certainly happened to me.

Anyway, it was good to read your write up.


Thanks Biggles, although Ancestry provides lots of helpful tools such as Thrulines a chromosome browser would be handy. Do you use DNA painter?
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: guest189040 on Friday 03 July 20 21:27 BST (UK)
Yes I use DNA Painter but have not got as far as uploading my DNA to any other matching site.
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: chiddicks on Friday 03 July 20 21:34 BST (UK)
I found my heritage really helpful lots of good matches, but found ftdna and gedmatch nowhere as good, but I guess itís just where your matches upload
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: coombs on Saturday 04 July 20 16:03 BST (UK)
I am yet to be bitten by the DNA bug. I like to stick to paper trails.

An ancestor of interest is Marie Cartwright born c1585. She wed my ancestor Sir Stephen Borde in 1605 in St Dunstan in the West, London. She died in 1667 in Westminster and is buried at St Margaret. I have got back on Stephen's ancestry quite a way but Marie is proving more difficult. She may have had a brother or father called John Cartwright, gent. I am sure if she married a barrister and a knight, she may have been from a well to do family herself.
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: chiddicks on Saturday 04 July 20 16:30 BST (UK)
I am yet to be bitten by the DNA bug. I like to stick to paper trails.

An ancestor of interest is Marie Cartwright born c1585. She wed my ancestor Sir Stephen Borde in 1605 in St Dunstan in the West, London. She died in 1667 in Westminster and is buried at St Margaret. I have got back on Stephen's ancestry quite a way but Marie is proving more difficult. She may have had a brother or father called John Cartwright, gent. I am sure if she married a barrister and a knight, she may have been from a well to do family herself.

DNA can help with more modern conundrums but much past 300 years and you are stretching the limits. It can definitely solve mysteries and puzzles that a paper trail canít
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: brigidmac on Saturday 04 July 20 17:35 BST (UK)
Very lmpressive + beautifully written .
Congratulations you are an inspiration .ps happy birthday
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: chiddicks on Saturday 04 July 20 17:37 BST (UK)
Thank you for your kind words and birthday wishes itís very much appreciated


 
Very lmpressive + beautifully written .
Congratulations you are an inspiration .ps happy birthday
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: Erato on Saturday 04 July 20 18:07 BST (UK)
I only have one goal:  to have fun on the chase.
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: coombs on Saturday 04 July 20 18:24 BST (UK)
I very much doubt DNA matches can extend beyond say 200 years, maybe one day when DNA advances.
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: brigidmac on Saturday 04 July 20 23:14 BST (UK)
Coombs may I disagree ,
my mother and I have DNA links to people from 1850 ...if more people built their trees back to 1820 I'm sure we would find some matches

The DNA experts may not have used my heritage or ancest but they had the tools to match king Richard  third DNA to modern day descendants 400+ years
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: chiddicks on Sunday 05 July 20 11:25 BST (UK)
I only have one goal:  to have fun on the chase.

The most important bit is to have fun, itís a hobby after all
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: chiddicks on Sunday 05 July 20 11:28 BST (UK)
I very much doubt DNA matches can extend beyond say 200 years, maybe one day when DNA advances.

I definitely have DNA matches around 1780ís - 1820ís as well, and thatís just Autosomal. If like I have, you take a Y DNA test that will take your paternal line back even further than that
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: coombs on Sunday 05 July 20 16:23 BST (UK)
Coombs may I disagree ,
my mother and I have DNA links to people from 1850 ...if more people built their trees back to 1820 I'm sure we would find some matches

The DNA experts may not have used my heritage or ancest but they had the tools to match king Richard  third DNA to modern day descendants 400+ years

Sorry I meant just autosomal DNA, unless it has been carried back to the 1700s by now.

Y DNA and mtDNA has come on in leaps and bounds.
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: chiddicks on Monday 12 July 21 16:49 BST (UK)
I'm still plugging away and plodding along with my genealogy goals for 2021, some of course have been sadly abandoned due to covid, but I am still hoping one day we can start to travel again!

https://chiddicksfamilytree.com/2021/07/11/my-half-yearly-report-2021/
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: Guy Etchells on Monday 12 July 21 18:16 BST (UK)
My half yearly report, so how did I do???


​​​​​​​https://chiddicksfamilytree.com/2020/06/28/my-half-yearly-report-how-did-i-do/
Sorry Paul but why is it important to set goals?
Genealogy or family history is recording the past and future history of my & associated families, I am not try to pass a test or meet a magazine deadline but to record the events of my living family and those who have past and as such is a way of life!
Cheers
Guy
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: chiddicks on Monday 12 July 21 18:37 BST (UK)
Hi Guy, we all work in different ways with regards to research and there is no problem at all with that. Around 4 or 5 years ago I completely lost focus on what I was researching, I ended up aimlessly searching with no structure and no goal and basically wasted 6 months of potential research time. I vowed never to do that again, hence why I set myself targets and goals, I work better that way, but of course, that's not for everyone.

This helps me to maintain focus on what I want to achieve. As an example, my oldest brick wall is to try and trace the birth location of my 4 x great grandfather Samuel Chiddicks born appx 1761, but I have no idea where. One of my targets is to strip all those records pertaining to him back to basics and go over them all completely again. By having that as a goal it helps to act as a constant reminder of what I need to do and why.

Like I say, goals, targets or whatever you want to call them will not work for everyone and I am a firm believer that if you have a system and it works for you then stick to it.
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: coombs on Monday 12 July 21 21:37 BST (UK)
Yes, one of my oldest brickwalls is my 20 year long search for the origins of Sarah Bradford (prev Coombs, nee Unknown). She died in Feb 1851 in London and said she was not born in county in 1841 census. What did please me is she witnessed an August 1835 wedding of Wm Smith to Anne Jenkins in Paddington. This was a month after her eldest son Matthew G Coombs married.
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: brigidmac on Tuesday 13 July 21 03:44 BST (UK)
My current goal is to find a way to get paid for research for others but that wont cost them a fortune.

Hoping to get a grant to sho importance of family history to individuals

Truly believe knowing your family history can help well being .

Among my relatives are several adoptees &  few brought up by what i can only call dysfunctional parents .
Learning facts about grandparents can sometimes explain how trauma .hardships prejudice etc effected their own children.

For adoptees finding pictures of even distant relatives can give a sense of self .

Im going to go back to doing gransgran workshops in local library and maybe set up a group where people who have subs to different sites  can help each other.

Inspired by rootschat philosophy of helping


Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: Guy Etchells on Tuesday 13 July 21 08:16 BST (UK)
Hi Guy, we all work in different ways with regards to research and there is no problem at all with that. Around 4 or 5 years ago I completely lost focus on what I was researching, I ended up aimlessly searching with no structure and no goal and basically wasted 6 months of potential research time. I vowed never to do that again, hence why I set myself targets and goals, I work better that way, but of course, that's not for everyone.

This helps me to maintain focus on what I want to achieve. As an example, my oldest brick wall is to try and trace the birth location of my 4 x great grandfather Samuel Chiddicks born appx 1761, but I have no idea where. One of my targets is to strip all those records pertaining to him back to basics and go over them all completely again. By having that as a goal it helps to act as a constant reminder of what I need to do and why.

Like I say, goals, targets or whatever you want to call them will not work for everyone and I am a firm believer that if you have a system and it works for you then stick to it.
Paul an number of years ago I visited Kew with an experienced family history researcher who had been researching her family tree for many years as had her uncle. I explained my method was to not bother to read anything concerning the names I was interested in (the time to read was on the 200 mile train journey home) but to simply take photocopies of everything of relevance in the archive. She decided to give my method a try and surprise surprise that elusive ancestor turned up (on the train home) in the copies she had made at Kew even though she and her uncle had both searched there in previous years for him.
The results she achieved that day showed her the shotgun approach works better than focused research when researching in distant archives. Focused research comes into its own when using local archives but few of us have that luxury
The problem with focused searches comes with indexes and lack of indexes or poor indexing. The shotgun approach works out more effective and in many if not most cases cheaper when researching in distant archives where limited time costs more than photocopying.
Cheers
Guy
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: brigidmac on Tuesday 13 July 21 11:20 BST (UK)
Love that story, Guy

I have a method for dna matches +that goes against conventional tree building but works

I create a floating branch with an ancestor of shared matches before i can see the link

Build downwards and join the trees when i have valid hypothesis with a person called' sailor from norwich '
or
'which child Smith' no gender alloicated
'Wife JONES'

Amazingly floating branches sometimes works without knowing dna matches

For example if a SMITH. Has witnessed a wedfing or is lodging with the JONES or lives next door to familyy its a way of saving them for later

Does that make sense ?


Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: chiddicks on Tuesday 13 July 21 15:30 BST (UK)
Yes, one of my oldest brickwalls is my 20 year long search for the origins of Sarah Bradford (prev Coombs, nee Unknown). She died in Feb 1851 in London and said she was not born in county in 1841 census. What did please me is she witnessed an August 1835 wedding of Wm Smith to Anne Jenkins in Paddington. This was a month after her eldest son Matthew G Coombs married.

Are the people she witnessed getting married family members???
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: chiddicks on Tuesday 13 July 21 15:33 BST (UK)
My current goal is to find a way to get paid for research for others but that wont cost them a fortune.

Hoping to get a grant to sho importance of family history to individuals

Truly believe knowing your family history can help well being .

Among my relatives are several adoptees &  few brought up by what i can only call dysfunctional parents .
Learning facts about grandparents can sometimes explain how trauma .hardships prejudice etc effected their own children.

For adoptees finding pictures of even distant relatives can give a sense of self .

Im going to go back to doing gransgran workshops in local library and maybe set up a group where people who have subs to different sites  can help each other.

Inspired by rootschat philosophy of helping


It sounds like you are putting something back into this wonderful hobby of ours by giving up your time freely in the pursuit of helping others. That's one of the great things about researching your family tree, people are always willing to help or offer ideas to help people on their own genealogical journeys, not many hobbies are as selfless as genealogy.

Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: chiddicks on Tuesday 13 July 21 15:38 BST (UK)
Hi Guy, we all work in different ways with regards to research and there is no problem at all with that. Around 4 or 5 years ago I completely lost focus on what I was researching, I ended up aimlessly searching with no structure and no goal and basically wasted 6 months of potential research time. I vowed never to do that again, hence why I set myself targets and goals, I work better that way, but of course, that's not for everyone.

This helps me to maintain focus on what I want to achieve. As an example, my oldest brick wall is to try and trace the birth location of my 4 x great grandfather Samuel Chiddicks born appx 1761, but I have no idea where. One of my targets is to strip all those records pertaining to him back to basics and go over them all completely again. By having that as a goal it helps to act as a constant reminder of what I need to do and why.

Like I say, goals, targets or whatever you want to call them will not work for everyone and I am a firm believer that if you have a system and it works for you then stick to it.
Paul an number of years ago I visited Kew with an experienced family history researcher who had been researching her family tree for many years as had her uncle. I explained my method was to not bother to read anything concerning the names I was interested in (the time to read was on the 200 mile train journey home) but to simply take photocopies of everything of relevance in the archive. She decided to give my method a try and surprise surprise that elusive ancestor turned up (on the train home) in the copies she had made at Kew even though she and her uncle had both searched there in previous years for him.
The results she achieved that day showed her the shotgun approach works better than focused research when researching in distant archives. Focused research comes into its own when using local archives but few of us have that luxury
The problem with focused searches comes with indexes and lack of indexes or poor indexing. The shotgun approach works out more effective and in many if not most cases cheaper when researching in distant archives where limited time costs more than photocopying.
Cheers
Guy

I think there is definitely room for the scattergun approach, your story proves it works. Different strategies will work depending on where you are searching online, at a record office or searching somewhere completely different. I have used the hoover up everything approach myself. I don't get to the ERO very often these days due to moving 200 miles North, so each and every visit is very much a hoovering exercise and a digestion exercise when I'm back in Cheshire! My goals are primarily there as a prompt and reminder of my overall focus rather than a specific focus.
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: brigidmac on Wednesday 14 July 21 07:19 BST (UK)
Guess what I've had an offer of some paid work
A matter of finding a fair price ...how do you charge for an unspecified amount of hours . Hugenit museum organisation charges £25 for first hour £20 after that for any subsequent hours

I wouldn't want my clients to find it exorbitant and would spend extra time because i enjoy it . What do genealogist s charge for tree building etc . DNA analysis & matching is a whole different field .

+ Id like to pay forward for all the help i had starting out from rootschat ancestry members and Genes Reunited
Thinking of charging a flat rate for month which will go towards my subs and include check in mails or calls  .
Apparently i have expertise and accreditation ! + Make a huge difference to peoples lives ..
Which is what i hope to convince a motivational company contracted to job centre that finding family .living or deceased effects well being .

Especially for adoptees or children of adoptees knowing if you came froma line of BIRKENHEAD butchers or Birmingham jewelers and obtainining photos of relatives is therapeutic .or finding a history of abuse or trauma may explain why a parent /grandparent didnt have parenting skills. I will start doing gransgran workshops at local library if thfey.ll have me ...will continue to do that for free as it encourages chldrenTo take an interest in their grandparents and social history.
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: chiddicks on Wednesday 14 July 21 14:36 BST (UK)
Guess what I've had an offer of some paid work
A matter of finding a fair price ...how do you charge for an unspecified amount of hours . Hugenit museum organisation charges £25 for first hour £20 after that for any subsequent hours

I wouldn't want my clients to find it exorbitant and would spend extra time because i enjoy it . What do genealogist s charge for tree building etc . DNA analysis & matching is a whole different field .

+ Id like to pay forward for all the help i had starting out from rootschat ancestry members and Genes Reunited
Thinking of charging a flat rate for month which will go towards my subs and include check in mails or calls  .
Apparently i have expertise and accreditation ! + Make a huge difference to peoples lives ..
Which is what i hope to convince a motivational company contracted to job centre that finding family .living or deceased effects well being .

Especially for adoptees or children of adoptees knowing if you came froma line of BIRKENHEAD butchers or Birmingham jewelers and obtainining photos of relatives is therapeutic .or finding a history of abuse or trauma may explain why a parent /grandparent didnt have parenting skills. I will start doing gransgran workshops at local library if thfey.ll have me ...will continue to do that for free as it encourages chldrenTo take an interest in their grandparents and social history.


Brilliant news! Well done you!

I actually have no idea what a professional genealogist charges these days, I guess depends on their own expertise and experience? I don't know if there are some professionals on here who might be able to help/guide you in the right direction with regards what to charge??
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: coombs on Wednesday 14 July 21 16:16 BST (UK)
Yes, one of my oldest brickwalls is my 20 year long search for the origins of Sarah Bradford (prev Coombs, nee Unknown). She died in Feb 1851 in London and said she was not born in county in 1841 census. What did please me is she witnessed an August 1835 wedding of Wm Smith to Anne Jenkins in Paddington. This was a month after her eldest son Matthew G Coombs married.

Are the people she witnessed getting married family members???

That is what I am thinking, they may have been friends but hopefully family. I have looked through all Paddington marriages 1824-1844 for any other instance of Sarah Coombs (Nee Unknown) later Bradford witnessing marriage and nothing. I have done a blanket search of some of Marylebone 1830s where she lived.

If William Smith or Anne Jenkins was related to Sarah, then it could be a clue to her origins. If one of the was a sibling of Sarah then it may give her maiden name, or one of them was a nephew or niece. Not sure if Wm Smith and Anne had any children, as there are so many William Smith's around, and many married to an Anne. When they married, both signed their names and bachelor and spinster. At least it is something to go on.
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: chiddicks on Wednesday 14 July 21 19:02 BST (UK)
I think she must be connected to them in some way, otherwise, why should she be there. Whether it's via family or friendship is difficult to say, but like you say it's something to go on. Have you tried DNA?
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: coombs on Wednesday 14 July 21 22:22 BST (UK)
I think she must be connected to them in some way, otherwise, why should she be there. Whether it's via family or friendship is difficult to say, but like you say it's something to go on. Have you tried DNA?

Hopefully family, as friends of ancestors do not help get you back further, but even so it is good to see they witnessed another marriage. Sarah's eldest son Matthew Coombs had married just a month before in July 1835 and her and her 2nd husband James witnessed the wedding.

The Wm Smith to Anne Jenkins marriage was August 1835 so 2 years before civil reg, and I did find a few Smith births with mmn Jenkins 1837-1840 in the Marylebone area in the new revised GRO index which give mmn from July 1837 onwards but further research has them to a different couple.

DNA seems to be a good step as it could help me break through this barrier. Not sure when Sarah wed her first husband George Coombs, who I descend from, I know he was originally from Dorset. If they did marry it is 99.9% certain it was not in London. That could be a clue to Sarah's origin, she may have been from down Dorset way herself.

An 1810 marriage in Axminster is a likely one but she was a widow, unless she was a very young widow as she was born 1790/1791.

Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: chiddicks on Thursday 15 July 21 19:33 BST (UK)
I think she must be connected to them in some way, otherwise, why should she be there. Whether it's via family or friendship is difficult to say, but like you say it's something to go on. Have you tried DNA?

Hopefully family, as friends of ancestors do not help get you back further, but even so it is good to see they witnessed another marriage. Sarah's eldest son Matthew Coombs had married just a month before in July 1835 and her and her 2nd husband James witnessed the wedding.

The Wm Smith to Anne Jenkins marriage was August 1835 so 2 years before civil reg, and I did find a few Smith births with mmn Jenkins 1837-1840 in the Marylebone area in the new revised GRO index which give mmn from July 1837 onwards but further research has them to a different couple.

DNA seems to be a good step as it could help me break through this barrier. Not sure when Sarah wed her first husband George Coombs, who I descend from, I know he was originally from Dorset. If they did marry it is 99.9% certain it was not in London. That could be a clue to Sarah's origin, she may have been from down Dorset way herself.

An 1810 marriage in Axminster is a likely one but she was a widow, unless she was a very young widow as she was born 1790/1791.



I know many researchers have reservations about DNA testing but if you are happy about taking a test and the potential discoveries it might bring, then there is every chance that it might help with your brick wall, but like all things genealogy-related there is never a guarantee! I was lucky enough to discover an unnamed Father of my great grandmother, but that was a combination of DNA testing and conventional research that led to a breakthrough. I just look at DNA as another tool in your toolbox so why not give it a go!


Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: coombs on Friday 16 July 21 12:29 BST (UK)
When Sarah Bradford died in Feb 1851 at Marylebone workhouse, a fellow inmate, Eliz Mockford registered the death. I researched her and do not think there is any family connection to her, she was just someone who she was in the workhouse with who was present at Sarah's death. Mrs Mockford was from Whittington, Staffordshire, just north of Birmingham.

Sarah may and been a Smith or Jenkins by birth if the William Smith and Anne Jenkins who wed in 1835 were relatives. Unless one was a nephew or niece of a sister of Sarah but at least it is a start. If George Coombs met Sarah in London about 1810, then she could have been from anywhere in England. But I have a feeling she was from down Dorset way like he was.

Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: chiddicks on Saturday 17 July 21 13:28 BST (UK)
When Sarah Bradford died in Feb 1851 at Marylebone workhouse, a fellow inmate, Eliz Mockford registered the death. I researched her and do not think there is any family connection to her, she was just someone who she was in the workhouse with who was present at Sarah's death. Mrs Mockford was from Whittington, Staffordshire, just north of Birmingham.

Sarah may and been a Smith or Jenkins by birth if the William Smith and Anne Jenkins who wed in 1835 were relatives. Unless one was a nephew or niece of a sister of Sarah but at least it is a start. If George Coombs met Sarah in London about 1810, then she could have been from anywhere in England. But I have a feeling she was from down Dorset way like he was.

Eliz Mockford could have been the workhouse masters wife possibly, if so, she might have registered multiple deaths in the same workhouse.

You at least have some names to possibly work with and I am a great believer in hunches and instinct, she may well have originated in Dorset, sometimes you just need a slice of luck or new records becoming available. Definitely worth giving DNA a shot.
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: coombs on Saturday 17 July 21 16:16 BST (UK)
DNA can certainly help with genealogy yes.

The absence of a likely marriage of Geo Coombs to Sarah is why it is hard finding her maiden surname. But that William Smith and Anne Jenkins is a good starting point. If the 1810 Axminster marriage is the right one, then Id have to find a Mr Davey marriage to Sarah.

There were cases of people acting as married when they were not, or they wed in a church which has not yet been indexed online, or the original was destroyed, usually this is for pre 1754 marriages but I am sure a fraction of the 1754-1837 marriages have got mislaid. 1754 was when the witness names were recorded, and they are fundamental unless they were regular witnesses.

Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: chiddicks on Saturday 17 July 21 19:09 BST (UK)
There was certainly plenty of cases where people went by the name of  ďmarriedĒ when they were probably not married. They could be separated from a previous husband or wife and would therefore be getting married a second time bigamously. Plus there are a whole host of different reasons why respectable people would want to appear to be married when they were not. The list is endless.

That makes our lives even harder. Are you anywhere near Dorset yourself? Are you a member of their local history society? Somebody who is local can offer a bit more local knowledge which sometimes help.
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: coombs on Saturday 17 July 21 19:49 BST (UK)
No i live in Norfolk so 200 miles from Dorset.

I am thinking DNA will be a tool, seeing as it is very hard to find Sarah's origins. If ever I was given a choice to ask 1 ancestor where they were born I would ask Sarah. She died in Feb 1851, just weeks prior to the 1851 census.
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: chiddicks on Saturday 17 July 21 19:59 BST (UK)
No i live in Norfolk so 200 miles from Dorset.

I am thinking DNA will be a tool, seeing as it is very hard to find Sarah's origins. If ever I was given a choice to ask 1 ancestor where they were born I would ask Sarah. She died in Feb 1851, just weeks prior to the 1851 census.

Now thatís even more frustrating! Then donít make it easy do they! If you do the DNA and get somewhere I would love to know the outcome myself! If I get time in the next few weeks Iíll have a look myself
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: brigidmac on Sunday 18 July 21 05:11 BST (UK)
Re reply 19

I have my first official commissioned PAID research have been paid in :computer lessons .gifts such as a tablet & a stamp collection
 chauffeur service chores. & goodwill .

Already manage close familys dna results mother aunt cousin

But also a dna matched war baby

+ In a career write up they can be clients on my books

Because for payments on this kind of longterm research i think an initial payment to set up a tree /discuss what areas to search / help understand dna results ( including what might NOT be found )

 LUMP sum for INTENSIVE (including DNA match analysis IF required)
followed by RETAINING fee so i can check MONTHLY  and REPORT any new documents or dna matches
Depending on how much client can discover on  their own .

Job centre allows me to earn £500 per month before benefits are effected.

I think if i go over i.ll come off benefits as long as i can stay on housing list

Id rather  CONSULT than start a BUSINESS

I have an APPRENTICE
 "researcher/PA/COMPUTER person
To  distant help me .

Ive helped make them a mini family tree For  grandparents in care home  to give aunts + uncles for Christmas.

They can add photos and pics of houses/ jobs /churches /art.

The aim is to get closer to cousins and maybe understand family traits + behaviour.+ History

Discovering a carpenter .a gardener + an artist  is already a thrill as
They are interested in gardening and mother is a sculptor/artist.
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: chiddicks on Sunday 18 July 21 10:22 BST (UK)
Great news that you have your first paid assignment, but never having been paid myself for any research, other than "in kind", it's always difficult to know what a "fair and reasonable" price should be, especially if you are doing this as a full-time job. i am sure that with a bit of research on the pricing structure you will come to a sensible rate worthy of the input and work involved,



Good luck with your new venture I am sure that you succeed.
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: coombs on Sunday 18 July 21 12:19 BST (UK)
No i live in Norfolk so 200 miles from Dorset.

I am thinking DNA will be a tool, seeing as it is very hard to find Sarah's origins. If ever I was given a choice to ask 1 ancestor where they were born I would ask Sarah. She died in Feb 1851, just weeks prior to the 1851 census.

Now thatís even more frustrating! Then donít make it easy do they! If you do the DNA and get somewhere I would love to know the outcome myself! If I get time in the next few weeks Iíll have a look myself

Thanks for the kind offer. It is nice to chat to someone about a certain genealogy brickwall. Sarah is one of my huge genealogy goals.

Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: chiddicks on Sunday 18 July 21 13:06 BST (UK)
No i live in Norfolk so 200 miles from Dorset.

I am thinking DNA will be a tool, seeing as it is very hard to find Sarah's origins. If ever I was given a choice to ask 1 ancestor where they were born I would ask Sarah. She died in Feb 1851, just weeks prior to the 1851 census.



Now thatís even more frustrating! Then donít make it easy do they! If you do the DNA and get somewhere I would love to know the outcome myself! If I get time in the next few weeks Iíll have a look myself

Thanks for the kind offer. It is nice to chat to someone about a certain genealogy brickwall. Sarah is one of my huge genealogy goals.


I am not sure that I will find anything but sometimes a fresh pair of eyes.....
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: chiddicks on Sunday 18 July 21 15:23 BST (UK)
No i live in Norfolk so 200 miles from Dorset.

I am thinking DNA will be a tool, seeing as it is very hard to find Sarah's origins. If ever I was given a choice to ask 1 ancestor where they were born I would ask Sarah. She died in Feb 1851, just weeks prior to the 1851 census.


Now thatís even more frustrating! Then donít make it easy do they! If you do the DNA and get somewhere I would love to know the outcome myself! If I get time in the next few weeks Iíll have a look myself


Thanks for the kind offer. It is nice to chat to someone about a certain genealogy brickwall. Sarah is one of my huge genealogy goals.




dm me your email address and I will see what I can find, found an entry on my heritage that is a bot conflicting.

Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: coombs on Sunday 18 July 21 15:35 BST (UK)
No i live in Norfolk so 200 miles from Dorset.

I am thinking DNA will be a tool, seeing as it is very hard to find Sarah's origins. If ever I was given a choice to ask 1 ancestor where they were born I would ask Sarah. She died in Feb 1851, just weeks prior to the 1851 census.


Now thatís even more frustrating! Then donít make it easy do they! If you do the DNA and get somewhere I would love to know the outcome myself! If I get time in the next few weeks Iíll have a look myself


Thanks for the kind offer. It is nice to chat to someone about a certain genealogy brickwall. Sarah is one of my huge genealogy goals.




dm me your email address and I will see what I can find, found an entry on my heritage that is a bot conflicting.

Done so. I may PM you with info on Sarah's 2nd husband James Bradford so we can discuss him, as I cannot seem to find what happened to him inbetween 1835 and 1841, save cluttering up this thread with this query.
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: chiddicks on Sunday 18 July 21 15:48 BST (UK)
Yep no worries
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: brigidmac on Monday 19 July 21 15:37 BST (UK)
Thanks chidficks for a ll your supportive comments .may stick to being paid in kind for a bit
And let my client pay ancestry renewal instead
A habe found myself an assistant who wants to do gis family tree .so we can work in collusion he can get a ftmree months subs to another site once ivebstarted him off .

Also taked to Salvation army today
Going to be put in touch with tneir search snd trace department
That would be a good place to volunteer especially if someone nneeds help with tracing using  dna

Coombs id be happy to help you thru quagmire of understanding results
Ive had so much help in other fields on here

Time travel detective is now a real proffession so please spread use of the term .

I.ll be running workshops about identifying british stamps .doing Edwardian photosoots dressing as ancestors & continuing with time travel stories and comedy
I think there will be a recording of August gigs
Anyone KNOW. Any future TTD S  please get in touch.how we can skill share .
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: chiddicks on Monday 19 July 21 15:48 BST (UK)
Thanks chidficks for a ll your supportive comments .may stick to being paid in kind for a bit
And let my client pay ancestry renewal instead
A habe found myself an assistant who wants to do gis family tree .so we can work in collusion he can get a ftmree months subs to another site once ivebstarted him off .

Also taked to Salvation army today
Going to be put in touch with tneir search snd trace department
That would be a good place to volunteer especially if someone nneeds help with tracing using  dna

Coombs id be happy to help you thru quagmire of understanding results
Ive had so much help in other fields on here

Time travel detective is now a real proffession so please spread use of the term .

I.ll be running workshops about identifying british stamps .doing Edwardian photosoots dressing as ancestors & continuing with time travel stories and comedy
I think there will be a recording of August gigs
Anyone KNOW. Any future TTD S  please get in touch.how we can skill share .


I love the alternative payment methods you have! Brilliant and very inventive, sometimes cash can be a blocker whereas something else can be of far more value to us. Feels like stepping back in time and bartering and trading much better system
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: coombs on Monday 19 July 21 21:39 BST (UK)
Thanks chidficks for a ll your supportive comments .may stick to being paid in kind for a bit
And let my client pay ancestry renewal instead
A habe found myself an assistant who wants to do gis family tree .so we can work in collusion he can get a ftmree months subs to another site once ivebstarted him off .

Also taked to Salvation army today
Going to be put in touch with tneir search snd trace department
That would be a good place to volunteer especially if someone nneeds help with tracing using  dna

Coombs id be happy to help you thru quagmire of understanding results
Ive had so much help in other fields on here

Time travel detective is now a real proffession so please spread use of the term .

I.ll be running workshops about identifying british stamps .doing Edwardian photosoots dressing as ancestors & continuing with time travel stories and comedy
I think there will be a recording of August gigs
Anyone KNOW. Any future TTD S  please get in touch.how we can skill share .

Thanks, often individual family brickwalls can be very complicated, to the researcher and to others who you are sharing the story with.

Hence why 3 ancestors who were alive in 1841, put "not born in county" and died before 1851 are my 3 main genealogy goal ancestors. All 3 died within 2 and a half years of the date of the 1851 census. 2 of the 3 ancestors died in 1849, if only they had hung on for 2 more years, and the other one just 2 months to live to 30 March 1851.
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: Guy Etchells on Tuesday 20 July 21 07:34 BST (UK)
Thanks chidficks for a ll your supportive comments .may stick to being paid in kind for a bit
And let my client pay ancestry renewal instead
A habe found myself an assistant who wants to do gis family tree .so we can work in collusion he can get a ftmree months subs to another site once ivebstarted him off .

Also taked to Salvation army today
Going to be put in touch with tneir search snd trace department
That would be a good place to volunteer especially if someone nneeds help with tracing using  dna

Coombs id be happy to help you thru quagmire of understanding results
Ive had so much help in other fields on here

Time travel detective is now a real proffession so please spread use of the term .

I.ll be running workshops about identifying british stamps .doing Edwardian photosoots dressing as ancestors & continuing with time travel stories and comedy
I think there will be a recording of August gigs
Anyone KNOW. Any future TTD S  please get in touch.how we can skill share .

Be very careful how you get paid HM Revenue may not put the same value on payments in kind as you do, this has lead many people into huge debts with them.
Cheers
Guy
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: chiddicks on Tuesday 20 July 21 13:12 BST (UK)
Thanks chidficks for a ll your supportive comments .may stick to being paid in kind for a bit
And let my client pay ancestry renewal instead
A habe found myself an assistant who wants to do gis family tree .so we can work in collusion he can get a ftmree months subs to another site once ivebstarted him off .

Also taked to Salvation army today
Going to be put in touch with tneir search snd trace department
That would be a good place to volunteer especially if someone nneeds help with tracing using  dna

Coombs id be happy to help you thru quagmire of understanding results
Ive had so much help in other fields on here

Time travel detective is now a real proffession so please spread use of the term .

I.ll be running workshops about identifying british stamps .doing Edwardian photosoots dressing as ancestors & continuing with time travel stories and comedy
I think there will be a recording of August gigs
Anyone KNOW. Any future TTD S  please get in touch.how we can skill share .

Thanks, often individual family brickwalls can be very complicated, to the researcher and to others who you are sharing the story with.

Hence why 3 ancestors who were alive in 1841, put "not born in county" and died before 1851 are my 3 main genealogy goal ancestors. All 3 died within 2 and a half years of the date of the 1851 census. 2 of the 3 ancestors died in 1849, if only they had hung on for 2 more years, and the other one just 2 months to live to 30 March 1851.



In theory, with every brick wall we solve, we create two more new ones 😂😂😂😂
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: coombs on Tuesday 20 July 21 16:04 BST (UK)
Of course there will be many records that are not online, and many that probably never will be.

One day we may get London marriages searchable by marriage witness or a PCC wills beneficiary index, that would really help us immensley, but I cannot see such a project happening for years. FreeREG has a few London records but most from Phillimore's. The witnesses on marriages 1754 onwards are worth their weight in gold.
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: coombs on Wednesday 21 July 21 13:28 BST (UK)
I think I have found a burial for an ancestor that I had been long looking for. Susannah Hollowell, I found a burial in 1826 of her in Bethnal Green in November 1826. The BG burials for Ancestry have 1823-2826 missing but they are on FindMyPast. About 20 years ago I was looking through St Matthew Bethnal green burials and never noticed any gaps, so they must have missed a book.

Susan Fradine, born in Bethnal Green wed Dennis Helsdon in 1784 then Samuel Hollowell in 1814. They lived in Northants for a time then her son moved back to London. Susan was mentioned in an 1820 will of a rellie by marriage, now I think I have finally found her burial.
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: Rena on Wednesday 21 July 21 15:15 BST (UK)

Susan Fradine, born in Bethnal Green wed Dennis Helsdon in 1784 then Samuel Hollowell in 1814. They lived in Northants for a time then her son moved back to London. Susan was mentioned in an 1820 will of a rellie by marriage, now I think I have finally found her burial.

It doesn't matter where they moved to, some people have surnames that give the places their ancesters lived in circa 1066

The name is pronounced as Helsdon.

Hellesdon is partly in Taverham Hundred in the county of Norfolk, and partly in the City of Norwich.
The name may also be spelled Hellesden.
The name is pronounced as Helsdon.
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: chiddicks on Wednesday 21 July 21 19:49 BST (UK)
I think I have found a burial for an ancestor that I had been long looking for. Susannah Hollowell, I found a burial in 1826 of her in Bethnal Green in November 1826. The BG burials for Ancestry have 1823-2826 missing but they are on FindMyPast. About 20 years ago I was looking through St Matthew Bethnal green burials and never noticed any gaps, so they must have missed a book.

Susan Fradine, born in Bethnal Green wed Dennis Helsdon in 1784 then Samuel Hollowell in 1814. They lived in Northants for a time then her son moved back to London. Susan was mentioned in an 1820 will of a rellie by marriage, now I think I have finally found her burial.


What a brilliant result! A good friend of mine has been talking about Ďmissing registersí in the big subscription sites for a long time, have a read of his blog it makes interesting reading



https://www.google.co.uk/amp/s/lifelinesresearch.co.uk/2020/09/06/where-have-all-the-registers-gone/amp/
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: coombs on Wednesday 21 July 21 21:06 BST (UK)
Oh so this site has also mentioned the missing burials on Ancestry for Bethnal Green. Seems people have contacted them and they give the usual bog standard reply of the registers are complete when they are clearly not. Sometimes the people you are after are right under your nose all the time.
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: chiddicks on Wednesday 21 July 21 21:28 BST (UK)
That's why it's always best to check the original or primary source where possible. Not always practical to do so of course.
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: brigidmac on Thursday 22 July 21 20:23 BST (UK)
im going to bementored and discuss the payment by skillshare method we are not talkimg big amounts so its less complicated

had young assistantringing me today to ask how he could help and hes shown interest in doing his family tree hes on some kind of payment where he doesnt have to look fior work but is keen to work within his capacities and to help children
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: chiddicks on Thursday 22 July 21 20:51 BST (UK)
im going to bementored and discuss the payment by skillshare method we are not talkimg big amounts so its less complicated

had young assistantringing me today to ask how he could help and hes shown interest in doing his family tree hes on some kind of payment where he doesnt have to look fior work but is keen to work within his capacities and to help children


mentoring and passing on your years of experience and skills is such a great thing to do and you are putting something worthwhile back into our hobby.

I think mentoring of young genealogists is such a great way to bring the younger generation into our hobby and integrate them with us oldies a bit more
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: coombs on Sunday 25 July 21 13:09 BST (UK)
Yes it is good to pass on your skills to others.

When I really begun genealogy I read books all about it and how it is done, and how there can be errors and omissions in the records. One book said census records were checked for accuracy. However there was no paper trail proving the info given in the census forms was right, the enumerators wrote down what they were told by the householder or anyone else filling out the form.

My 2xgreat gran was born in Sussex but her parents moved to London when she was a baby, and she always said she was born in London in later censuses. Hate to break it to you Kate, up there somewhere lol, but you wasn't. Still a Londoner, just not born there.
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: Rena on Sunday 25 July 21 13:34 BST (UK)
Yes it is good to pass on your skills to others.

My 2xgreat gran was born in Sussex but her parents moved to London when she was a baby, and she always said she was born in London in later censuses. Hate to break it to you Kate, up there somewhere lol, but you wasn't. Still a Londoner, just not born there.

I've noticed that when a couple of the males that I'm following left home they stated on the census that they were born in the place they first recalled living in.  It wasn't until they were married and probably their parents had corrected them, or they were given their baptism document, that they then stated their correct place of birth.

As for setting genealogy goals - I don't set goals anymore.   I try to adhere to the old adage.... "If a job is worth doing, it's worth doing well".
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: River Tyne Lass on Sunday 25 July 21 15:28 BST (UK)
I had an ancestor living in Yorkshire; birth place in census recorded as 'Botley'.  Real birthplace was Birtley, (Durham).
Another had birthplace of 'Morton'; family had lived in Murton and New York, not far from North Shields.
I suspect these ancestors may have had strong North East accents and the census taker just recorded as heard.
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: Rena on Sunday 25 July 21 15:34 BST (UK)
I had an ancestor living in Yorkshire; birth place in census recorded as 'Botley'.  Real birthplace was Birtley, (Durham).


It's a good job I wasn't looking for them as I translated the birthplace as "Batley", East Riding, Yorkshire, which means the poor thing would never have got any family   :-[
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: chiddicks on Sunday 25 July 21 20:07 BST (UK)
Yes it is good to pass on your skills to others.

When I really begun genealogy I read books all about it and how it is done, and how there can be errors and omissions in the records. One book said census records were checked for accuracy. However there was no paper trail proving the info given in the census forms was right, the enumerators wrote down what they were told by the householder or anyone else filling out the form.

My 2xgreat gran was born in Sussex but her parents moved to London when she was a baby, and she always said she was born in London in later censuses. Hate to break it to you Kate, up there somewhere lol, but you wasn't. Still a Londoner, just not born there.



i wonder if they genuinely didn't know or maybe just preferred another location instead???
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: chiddicks on Sunday 25 July 21 20:12 BST (UK)
Yes it is good to pass on your skills to others.

My 2xgreat gran was born in Sussex but her parents moved to London when she was a baby, and she always said she was born in London in later censuses. Hate to break it to you Kate, up there somewhere lol, but you wasn't. Still a Londoner, just not born there.

I've noticed that when a couple of the males that I'm following left home they stated on the census that they were born in the place they first recalled living in.  It wasn't until they were married and probably their parents had corrected them, or they were given their baptism document, that they then stated their correct place of birth.

As for setting genealogy goals - I don't set goals anymore.   I try to adhere to the old adage.... "If a job is worth doing, it's worth doing well".


I like that old adage Rena, it doesn't matter what we call ourselves we should let the quality of our work speak for ourselves.
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: chiddicks on Sunday 25 July 21 20:13 BST (UK)
I had an ancestor living in Yorkshire; birth place in census recorded as 'Botley'.  Real birthplace was Birtley, (Durham).
Another had birthplace of 'Morton'; family had lived in Murton and New York, not far from North Shields.
I suspect these ancestors may have had strong North East accents and the census taker just recorded as heard.

Extremely common for census errors, local accents and dialects, especially if an incumbent was from out of the area.
Title: Re: The Importance of Setting yourself Genealogy Goals
Post by: Erato on Sunday 25 July 21 20:22 BST (UK)
My best was an ancestor from Old Cleve, Somerset recorded as Oak Leaf, Somerset.