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General => The Common Room => Topic started by: mezentia on Tuesday 06 October 20 10:22 BST (UK)

Title: Oxford men and their colleges 1880 - 1892
Post by: mezentia on Tuesday 06 October 20 10:22 BST (UK)
I discovered the entry in this publication for one John Stanley Nix (image attached). Most of it makes sense, but what does "1S. John, arm." mean, and "HONOURS:-3 classical mods. 89, 3 history 90"? They are, I think, subjects and dates, but what are "classical mods", and what does the number 3 mean?
Title: Re: Oxford men and their colleges 1880 - 1892
Post by: Gadget on Tuesday 06 October 20 10:30 BST (UK)
Does this help:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honour_Moderations
Title: Re: Oxford men and their colleges 1880 - 1892
Post by: Christine53 on Tuesday 06 October 20 10:36 BST (UK)
 I think the numbers , 87 , 89 , 90 are the years and 3 refers to the grade of degree awarded.
1s John I think is eldest son of John , not sure about arm.

Edit - googled Arm - it's short for armiger , similar to esquire.
Title: Re: Oxford men and their colleges 1880 - 1892
Post by: KGarrad on Tuesday 06 October 20 11:41 BST (UK)
An armiger is someone entitled to heraldic arms.
Title: Re: Oxford men and their colleges 1880 - 1892
Post by: mezentia on Tuesday 06 October 20 11:56 BST (UK)
Thanks everyone for your help. Yes, John is the first son, and his father did have a quite big farm - over 1200 acres, and therefore possibly quite well connected, hence the "armiger". I will follow up the other references, and ask my daughter who actually works at Oxford University - I haven't done it yet as it's induction and she very busy. There seems to be quite a bit on classic mods on their website, so yet more background reading to do  :)
Title: Re: Oxford men and their colleges 1880 - 1892
Post by: stanmapstone on Tuesday 06 October 20 13:26 BST (UK)
An armiger is someone entitled to heraldic arms.

 In some documents notably the index of past students of Oxford University Alumni
Oxonienses the abbreviation Arm. is short for armiger which is the Latin version of Esquire
and therefore does not necessarily indicate that the person had a Coat of Arms.

file:///C:/Users/stanm/Downloads/Esquire%20Gentleman%20and%20Yeoman.pdf

Stan