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Messages - BronwenS

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 ... 82
1
Handwriting Deciphering & Recognition / Re: Latin also
« on: Friday 24 September 21 10:47 BST (UK)  »
Thanks Graham.

2
Handwriting Deciphering & Recognition / Re: Latin also
« on: Thursday 23 September 21 23:01 BST (UK)  »
I had another look at this with the info on the man.  I see they don't have her surname as Offaly but  Gladys ap Conwyn so perhaps I am up the garden path again, been there many times. 

It is this family that I am interessted in  Sir William Offley 1400 and somewhere I read the possibility that Beatrice or Agnes may have been an earlier Offley.

Beautiful warm spring day here in Otautahi / Christchurch, Aotearoa, today, gardening will be part of the day.

Nga mihi
Bronwen

3
Handwriting Deciphering & Recognition / Re: Latin also
« on: Thursday 23 September 21 20:40 BST (UK)  »
Many thanks Bookbox, I hadn't got that far with googling his name.  But I had seen somewhere that her name was not Beatrice but Gladys.

Nga mihi nui
Bronwen
Aotearoa

4
Handwriting Deciphering & Recognition / Re: Latin also
« on: Thursday 23 September 21 08:45 BST (UK)  »
Great thank you very much.

Nga mihi
Bronwen

5
Handwriting Deciphering & Recognition / Latin also
« on: Thursday 23 September 21 08:15 BST (UK)  »
Kia ora

I have these two pieces, is the Latin roughly the same as the one in English?  Or just her marriage?

Nga mihi
Bronwen
Aotearoa

Beatrice de Offaly was born in 1052 (Kildare, Edenderry, County Offaly, Ireland, pretty unlikely)  She married Walter FitzOther Constable of Windsor Castle 1st Feudal Baron of Eton, Buckinghamshire about 1067, in Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales.  They were the parents of at least 5 sons. She died about 1100, in England, at the age of 48.

The Chronicle of Abingdon records that "Walterus filius Oteri, castellanus de Uuildesore" restored "duas silvas…Virdelæ et Basceat, apud Winckefeld nostram villam" to the abbot of Abingdon, dated to [1100/16], and that "uxorem suam Beatricem cum filio suo Willelmo" effected the transfer 8 Sep. (Chronicon Monasterii de Abingdon, Vol. II, p. 132. http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISHNOBILITYMEDIEVAL3T-Z.htm#_To...

6
The Common Room / Re: Conquest of Cola
« on: Sunday 12 September 21 20:25 BST (UK)  »
Old King Cole was a merry old soul.....

Of course of course. 

Many thanks that is really interesting.

Nga mihi nui (very best wishes)
Bronwen
Aotearoa

7
The Common Room / Re: Conquest of Cola
« on: Sunday 12 September 21 08:59 BST (UK)  »
Thanks very much that now makes real sense.
I must say Cola seems such an odd name back in those days.

Nga mihi nui (very best wishes)
Bronwen
Aotearoa

8
The Common Room / Re: Conquest of Cola
« on: Saturday 11 September 21 23:10 BST (UK)  »
Great thanks Monica, mostly it came up with that drink made in the U.S.A.

Intense reads indeed I will just scan over them and see if I can understand it and put it into a sentence or two. 

Nga mihi nui (very best wishes)
Bronwen

9
The Common Room / Conquest of Cola
« on: Saturday 11 September 21 22:44 BST (UK)  »
Kia ora

I am just wanting to understand what the 'Conquest of Cola' was.

I have information regarding Benefield manor which says: 
The manor of Twineham Benfield was held before the Conquest by Cola, of King Edward the Confessor, and Turgod held it of him, for two hides. 

I have of course looked on-line but I haven't found any information that clarifies the 'conquest of cola'.

Any help appreciated.

Nga mihi
Bronwen
Otautahi
Aotearoa

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