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Messages - Kiltpin

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 ... 90
1
The Common Room / Re: Burial Records
« on: Today at 14:14 »
My understanding is that they are not protected under Data Protection legislation. It is the old legal adage "You can't slander the dead." 

It strikes me that they just don't want the bother of doing it.

Regards 

Chas

3
The Common Room / Re: Ancestry Census Address Search
« on: Friday 07 May 21 20:34 BST (UK)  »
It is a new feature in Find My Past.
Regards 

Chas

4
The Common Room / Re: Identifiers on photos
« on: Thursday 06 May 21 14:47 BST (UK)  »
When I scan a photograph, I also create a Notepad document, with the same name. The computer will allow it because one is a .jpg and the other is .txt. Doing this has two advantages - 

1 - Because the names are the same, they will always stick together in the file system 

and 

2 - I can add any other information - All the Who, What, Where, When, Why and Hows 

Regards 

Chas

5
The Common Room / Re: Identifiers on photos
« on: Thursday 06 May 21 10:31 BST (UK)  »
My wife's uncle was killed at the battle of Pusan, Korea, aged 19. He was in the Black Watch. He had re-badged from the Royal Corps of Transport. 

We have all sorts of pictures of his grave, his medals, school reports, autopsy report, but we have no idea what he looked like. We do have, though, 3 snapshots of 3 cheery lads in RCT uniforms recovering a Bedford lorry. On the back of each, in his own handwriting is "Me and my mates". 

Regards 

Chas

6
The Common Room / Re: Occupation - Collarmaker
« on: Sunday 02 May 21 18:03 BST (UK)  »
It seems that Unsprung is correct - 

"The detachable collar was invented by Hannah Montague in Troy, New York, in 1827, after she snipped off the collar from one of her husband's shirts to wash it, and then sewed it back on. The Rev. Ebenezar Brown, a businessman in town, proceeded to commercialize it. The manufacture of detachable collars and the associated shirts became a significant industry in Troy." 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Detachable_collar 

Regards 

Chas

7
The Lighter Side / Re: Does family history get to you sometimes?
« on: Friday 23 April 21 12:41 BST (UK)  »

In the countryside they would have had clean air to breathe, clean water to drink and often a bit of garden to grow a few vegetables and keep some chickens or even a pig.
In contrast living in the city meant polluted air & water and overcrowded living conditions.
 

Of course, Thetford was the exception that proved the rule. For the longest time the infant mortality in Thetford was higher than Whitechapel (which was one of the most deprived places in the country). 

It seems the Aldermen approved the abstraction of drinking water DOWNSTREAM from where effluent was deposited. Locally, diarrhoea was known as the Thetford Trotts. Luckily for the town, WWI arrived with many hundreds of men and a new borehole was dug on the other side of town, away from the river. 

Regards 

Chas

8
The Lighter Side / Re: Does family history get to you sometimes?
« on: Friday 23 April 21 11:40 BST (UK)  »
   I think rural life in the 19th century was generally healthier - my family at that time seem to have raised most of their children. I have no illusions about rural poverty and living conditions, but they were probably safer that urban life.
   The life span may have been longer as well. I have a press cutting from 1868 about four generations of the family working in the harvest fields aged from 94 to 22, two of them women.
 

I have often thought the same. My wife had a distant cousin, who was sent up from London 4 times a year. The instructions were - "During the hours of daylight, come rain or shine, he was to stand in the garden for 1 hour and breathe. The same again during the hours of darkness." 

It became a general threat in the family, by overworked mothers to their children - "If you two don't behave, I'll send you out to the garden to breathe!" 

Regards 

Chas

9
The Common Room / Re: Uninformative death certificate
« on: Friday 23 April 21 11:22 BST (UK)  »
I don't think I've actually seen an example, but I understand that death certificates for civilians killed in WW2 bombing just give the cause of death as something like "due to war operations". Perhaps someone can confirm? All part of obfuscation to prevent the Luftwaffe finding out how effective the raids were being.
My wife's uncle's family were "killed by enemy actions". 

Regards 

Chas

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