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Messages - Iain...

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1
The Common Room / Re: Icehouse :
« on: Saturday 24 September 22 10:25 BST (UK)  »
Not as far as I know Ray.  I will be visiting the site next month to find its exact position relative to the chapel.  This is just a hole with a brick lining and vaulted roof.

You can see more details concerning the renovation in this URL. (quarter way down)
https://www.brania.net/recherches/reportages/la-chapelle-du-goumont/

Sorry everyone..., this isn't quite genealogy.  I just thought that someone could have put a name to it.
Have a nice weekend.   

2
The Common Room / Re: Icehouse :
« on: Friday 23 September 22 09:48 BST (UK)  »
Thank you Ray… 
That’s what I thought at the start. (with the long stone being something to sit on)  However, the access hole is far too small for any pot-bellied villain.  I know one man who went down and he’s as thin as a rake. 
I think this was more of a cool room to store foodstuffs.  However, the curved stone remains a mystery. 

3
The Common Room / Re: Icehouse :
« on: Thursday 22 September 22 08:39 BST (UK)  »
Thank you SL…, very interesting. 

I’m certainly no icehouse expert, although the little I’ve read so far does tell me that they need a good drainage system. (for logical reasons)  We have one close to my house and belongs to the local mansion, and as you say, this is just next to a river.

However, Hougoumont was built on a low plateau, meaning that the wells needed to be deep.
In the meantime, the artist Denis Dighton painted the northern exterior side of the chateau’s cidery building, and painted what looks like an icehouse.  This was situated higher than the annual floods, and has a nearby roadside ditch for drainage.  Via the famous Northgate which was breached by the French, this ‘icehouse’ and the ‘cool room’ is about 100-yards apart.   

But as you say, access difficulties obviously point to child labour.  Lol…, had I been that 3xGr Grandfather with my midriff bulge, I could certainly never walk its floor.  Which is ‘spongy’ following 200 years.

I’m friends with many in the ‘Waterloo Uncovered’ team. (soldier archaeologists)  I’ll ask them to take a look next year.

Thanks again SL… 

4
The Common Room / Icehouse :
« on: Wednesday 21 September 22 09:26 BST (UK)  »
Good morning everyone…

I’ve posted this just in the off-chance that someone may have seen something like this near Great Granddad’s icehouse.  If so, any idea what this granite block was used for ? 
Let me explain…

This underground room can be found in the Hougoumont farm at Waterloo.  I live nearby. 
It was not part of the chateau, and it is not deep enough to be a well. (there are two nearby wells and the water level is much deeper)  And it is certainly too small for it to be an icehouse. 
However, some friends say that it could have been a room to stock the ice taken from an icehouse, which was probably situated somewhere outside the domain.  Such a room could then have facilitated easy access to the ice, while rendering it a ‘cool room’ to conserve foodstuffs. 
If this was the case, then we could be looking at something linked to child labour, as the access hole is only 18-inches wide. 

If this room was used to stock blocks of ice, and if children were sent down to bring it up, (in pieces) is it possible that that granite block in the far corner was used to crush the ice ?
If we look carefully, it has a rounded underside.  And it doesn’t need much imagination to visualize a young lad standing on it like a seesaw, while another pushes the ice under one end to have it crushed. 
Or was there another use for it ?

Thanks in advance…, Iain. 

5
Argyllshire / Re: Isle of Coll/Tyree - Lachlan McArthur b. c1760.
« on: Tuesday 12 July 22 15:42 BST (UK)  »
Hi Mollie..., and welcome to RootsChat.  Murdoch is my 2nd Cousin 5x removed.  Birth July 1787 Helipol.  Death before 1851, Balinoe.  However, his father was John McArthur 1758 - ???? and mother Mary Campbel, 1759 - ????

His wife was Marjory or Marion McLean 1788-1858 and they had a dauughter called Marjory 1824-1881.

Normally I would advise someone like yourself to be careful with this data as I have been known to make mistakes. (lol)  But this info comes from a professional genealogist on the island.

Good luck..., Iain. 

https://www.ancestry.co.uk/family-tree/person/tree/33342780/person/28896026454/facts

6
The Common Room / Re: 1939 register queries
« on: Saturday 28 May 22 10:10 BST (UK)  »
   I have 2 questions about the attached clip.

Hi...   I had a similar issue a few years back. 
https://www.rootschat.com/forum/index.php?topic=823241.0


8
Armed Forces / Re: The Royal Chelsea Hospital and pensions:
« on: Saturday 23 April 22 15:48 BST (UK)  »
This is Sgt. Fraser...   Matthew Clay was Richard's friend.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9dqbh4tqXSM

Quite a few errors, but nonetheless amusing.

The Light Company was divided into two platoons.  Richard was in the assault platoon, while Matthew was in the support platoon.  Those who didn't die in the assault platoon, were nearly all Courts-Martialled. (scapegoats for a Lieutenant Colonel)

9
Armed Forces / Re: The Royal Chelsea Hospital and pensions:
« on: Saturday 23 April 22 15:08 BST (UK)  »
Previously I noted 3 children of Richard & Jane, but I now think that there was a 4th child, Peter,
Any thoughts?

UKgirl…, just a quick ‘FYI.’ 
Richard was in the Light Company of the ‘Scots Guards.’ (3rd regiment of Foot Guards)  His Sergeant was Ralph Fraser and was one of the most decorated soldiers in the British Army, then moved on to become one of Queen Victoria’s Almsman at Westminster Abbey.  Twice wounded, and the first wound in the leg was in Egypt. 
Of course, Faith was born well after Richard’s demob.  However, as a weaver, could Ralph’s ‘lamp swinging’ over a cup of gin have pushed his commercial activities to the souks near the pyramids ?   Lol…, scraping the barrel a bit there.  Nonetheless, I’ll have a browse through the BNA.  It would be nice to find him there. 

During the Battle of Waterloo, I am certain that he was a walking-wounded.  My Regiment is a character-building machine, and I wouldn’t be at all surprised if he became an entrepreneur.  Lol…, at nearly 75, I still have a VAT number. 

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