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Messages - davidbappleton

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19
Heraldry Crests and Coats of Arms / Re: CoA coloured?
« on: Monday 05 February 18 22:20 GMT (UK)  »
Not awfully clear from the visitation if the fleur de lis on the 3rd quarter are black (sable), along with the crosslets fitchee. It also doesn't give a colour for the fess on the 4th quarter.

"In blazoning a Coat of Arms in which two or more Charges of the same Tincture immediately follow each other in the Blazon, it is not necessary to mention the tincture until all the Charges of such Tincture have been specified." (John E. Cussans, Handbook of Heraldry, 1882, p. 161)

In this case, yes, both the fleurs-de-lis and the crosses crosslet fitchy in the third quarter are "sable," and the fess in the fourth quarter is the same "argent" as the crosses crosslet by which it is surrounded.

David


20
Heraldry Crests and Coats of Arms / Re: CoA coloured?
« on: Sunday 04 February 18 21:26 GMT (UK)  »
Here is a colored version of the arms from the image you uploaded, colored in according to the blazon given there.

I hope that this is helpful.

David

21
The only entry in Burke's General Armory for Streeter (there is no entry under Streater) is for a family in Kent.

Sorry!

David

22
Yes, it's a bit of a mess. It's not a real coat of arms; it looks like something designed to be reminiscent of real arms (in this case, Spain) without actually being those arms.

The colors are all wrong, and the arrangement of the quarters is inaccurate for the arms of Spain, but the design is: the upper left quarter is Aragon and the Two Sicilies; the upper right quarter is Leon; the lower left quarter is Castile; the lower right quarter is Aragon; and the oval inescutcheon is the House of Bourbon, Anjou branch.

You can see an illustrated article about the coat of arms of Spain and its historical development on Wikipedia at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coat_of_arms_of_Spain.

David

23
Heraldry Crests and Coats of Arms / Re: Owen Coat Of Arms Watercolor
« on: Monday 23 October 17 22:53 BST (UK)  »
The red hand? I don't see any here!

Exactly. There isn't one. If this were painted for the 8th baronet, there probably would be.

David

24
Heraldry Crests and Coats of Arms / Re: Owen Coat Of Arms Watercolor
« on: Monday 23 October 17 19:03 BST (UK)  »
So, in my case we can't be sure who this achievement belonged to unless we have some additional information?
If the notation on the back is correct and the painting was done circa 1830, is it possible it belonged to Sir William Owen, the 8th baronet?

The short answer to both of your questions is "yes."

That is, yes, it's generally hard to know for sure to whom an achievement belonged without additional (usually genealogical) information; and yes, it is possible that it belonged to the 8th baronet. However, I have to wonder how likely it is that any baronet would have a painting done of his arms and omit the badge of a baronet in the depiction. So while it is possible that this painting was of Sir William Owen's arms, I'm not sure how probable that identification is.

David

25
Heraldry Crests and Coats of Arms / Re: Assistance with two Family crests
« on: Friday 21 July 17 14:55 BST (UK)  »
It wasn't the standard practice to grant a coat of arms to an individual, his father, and his grandfather, but it wasn't unheard of, either.

You might try looking at the catalogues and databases held by the Genealogical Office (which includes the records of the Chief Herald of Ireland (CHI)) to see if your ancestor's name appears there. You could then write the CHI to obtain more information, if it's not already on-line in one of their digitized collections. The catalogues and database indexes can be found on the website of the National Library of Ireland at http://www.nli.ie/en/heraldry-catalogues-and-databases.aspx

David

26
Heraldry Crests and Coats of Arms / Re: Assistance with two Family crests
« on: Thursday 06 July 17 14:57 BST (UK)  »
In the phrase "temp. Queen Elizabeth," "temp." is from the Latin tempus, or "time" (as in the phrase tempus fugit, "time flies." It's shorthand for "in the time of Queen Elizabeth."

Grantees of Arms to the End of the 17th Century (Foster) (1915) states that this coat of arms (with a mullet for difference) was confirmed in 1603, possibly by William Segar, then Norroy King of Arms, to William, younger son of John Peneyfather,* of Barton under Needwood, Staffordshire. I have attached a scan of the entry from the book. So the undifferenced arms would have been granted sometime previous to 1603 to John Peneyfather.

David


* Spelling was not as fixed back then as it is now. Indeed, in my own family tree, among the Bigelow branch in the 17th and early 18th Centuries, I have found spellings ranging from Biglo to Biguloh to Biggalough (and even Baguley). And even in the 19th Century, American humorist Mark Twain once said that he could have no respect for a man who couldn't think of more than one way to spell a word.

27
Heraldry Crests and Coats of Arms / Re: Assistance with two Family crests
« on: Tuesday 27 June 17 20:47 BST (UK)  »
LOL! You are most welcome!

David

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