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Messages - behindthefrogs

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46
  Incidentally they did use the term sister in law for what we would now call a step sister.

That's interesting too. Do you know what the correct relationship would have been for a "cousin-in-law" as I have one but can't match him yet  ::)

My theory regarding the late marriage may have been that one or other may not have been "accepted" & married when that one's parent's passed  ???

Annie.

If you are talking about prior to 1800, the term cousin was used to denote almost any relative who was outside the direct lines and their siblings.  Cousin in law would thus denote any relative of a spouse related through a previous marriage.  In today's terms the child of a stepfather's sister or brother in law for example.

Today it would either mean the child of a parent's brother in law or sister in law, or the cousin of a brother in law or sister in law.

47
Back in the start of the 19th century and earlier it was believed that marriage create a blood relationship and many of these laws derive from that belief.  As an example you will find that what we now call a sister in law was referred to as a sister and not distinguished from a "true" blood sister.  Incidentally they did use the term sister in law for what we would now call a step sister.

48
Hertfordshire Lookup Requests / Re: baptised twice?
« on: Thursday 18 September 14 15:54 BST (UK)  »
In those days when removal of the poor back to their home parish still took place baptism in the parish church was necessary to establish residence.

49
Occupation Interests / Re: 1911 Vegetarian Kitchen maid - Lambeth
« on: Sunday 10 August 14 14:06 BST (UK)  »
My old dictionary from around that period defines vegetarian in the same way as we would today.  There is no indication that would link it to just working with vegetables.

50
The Isle of Man also has a strange relationship with the commonwealth of which it is not a member but does participate in various of its organisations like the commonwealth games.

Wot?!
The Isle of Man is indeed a member of the Commonwealth! ;D

Why do so many people have problems with the status of the Isle of Man?

It is a Crown Dependency, NOT part of the UK (Or England, or Scotland).
It is an Associate member of the EU - not officially part of the EU.
It is a member of The Commonwealth.
Queen Elizabeth is in fact the Lord of Mann!

It has it's own Parliament, Tynwald, which has been in existence for over 1000 years.
Has it's own legal system - using Advocates and Deemsters rather than lawyers, solicitors and judges.
Issues it's own stamps and currency!

The Isle of Man is not an associate member of the EU but has various trading rights negotiated as part of the UK's membership.

Similarly it is not a member of the Commonwealth, unless this has happened in the last year but certainly was contemplating applying a year or so ago.  However as a result of its relationship with the UK it takes part in the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association amongst other Commonwealth institutions.

The Channel Island Bailiwicks of Guernsey and Jersey have similar relationships.  The other main channel islands are part of the Bailiwick of Guernsey.

51
Always knew there was some kind of independence about Isle of Man/Manx but had no idea they were not actually part of UK nor the EU.
As I said in an earlier post this thread is a great learning curve.  The variety of facts, thoughts and opinions is fascinating.
Thanks again Westy11 for starting this post.
Regards Margaret
The Isle of Man also has a strange relationship with the commonwealth of which it is not a member but does participate in various of its organisations like the commonwealth games.

52
The difference of course is that regular church attendance means once every week or so for many people whereas regular mosque attendance means every day.  A large proportion of muslims attend Friday prayers every week.

53
If measured in terms of attendance at formal worship, the main religion in most of the UK is now probably Islam.  It is important that we declare our religion as Christian as well as specifying the denomination.

54
You can either count the place where various people were born in which case you are 100% the country where you were born, or you can count the blood lines of the various ancestors as far back as you can go.  In the latter case the 50% 25% 25% answer is an approximation back to your grandparents.  You cannot mix the two and come to a sensible answer.

Expressed as a vulgar fraction instead of a percentage the denominator will always be a power of two.  (ie half quarter, eigths etc) You should never get answers that involve sixths etc which can only occur from mixing up two methods of measurement, or by not giving each line the same prominence.

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