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Messages - willyam

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 ... 15
1
Lancashire / Re: Could this be our Joseph Dickinson?
« on: Monday 22 November 21 21:27 GMT (UK)  »
It may just be me but, as well as not finding Joseph, I cannot also find Margaret in the 1911 census - who was seemingly not residing with her son at that time.

Additionally, a search for 4 Hilton Street in Lower Broughton St Clement only brings up an entry within the 1911 summary sheet but not also the detailed return itself.

My interpretation of the summary entry, which is listed under the name of a Mr Halstead, is that with 10 persons in residence [7 females & 3 males] it might have been a rooming house - which could explain why Joseph & Margaret later both cited no. 4 as their place of residence on their wedding day.

Regrettably the absence of the 1911 census return might imply that it has not survived.

Hopefully someone with a more expert eye than I may be able to establish otherwise.

Willyam

2
Lancashire / Re: Could this be our Joseph Dickinson?
« on: Saturday 20 November 21 22:47 GMT (UK)  »
big g,

You have advised that you have the marriage certificate for Joseph & Margaret in Salford in July 1917.

Are you able to share the details therein regarding his address & occupation?

I ask this because, given his year of birth, there is a strong possibility that Joseph might have been in the military prior to his marriage and that he also could have been discharged (perhaps as unfit for further service) and thus able to marry before the end of hostilities.

I mention this because I have been tracking 2 military brothers - one of which married in August 1917 after being discharged and the other of which did not appear in the 1911 census because he was a deserter on the day that the census was taken.

Always a long shot of course, but there might just be something on the marriage certificate that could help.

Willyam

3
Lancashire / Re: Could this be our Joseph Dickinson?
« on: Friday 19 November 21 22:34 GMT (UK)  »
Hopefully a good outcome to your search - but be aware:

as the probate index is only in respect of Administration, this usually implies that there was no Will and thus no further information is likely to be forthcoming if you pay £1.50 for a copy of the paperwork

and

as the application for the administration of Joseph's Estate further suggests that he had no immediate next-of-kin at the time of his death, there is a likelihood that the informant on his death record might well only be a hospital bereavement officer - rather than an identifiable relative.

Willyam

4
Lancashire / Re: Could this be our Joseph Dickinson?
« on: Thursday 18 November 21 22:26 GMT (UK)  »
In the Probate Index there is an entry in respect of a Joseph Dickinson, of 1 Beckett Street in Gorton,
who died on 15th February 1965 in the Manchester Royal Infirmary.

I believe that he is your man - because Administration was granted on 22nd April to: 'Ann Doodson, a widow'.

As you will already probably know, Doodson was the married name of Joseph's younger sister Annie.

Willyam

5
World War One / Re: Shore leave from Royal Navy WW1 HMAS Sydney
« on: Thursday 18 November 21 15:28 GMT (UK)  »
Lisa,

I would imagine that there would have been many variable factors involved in respect of the survivability of a premature baby in 1917 - added to which would have been the sheer determination of the new-born child to live.

One additional thought has occurred to me and that relates to your grandmother's baptism date.

I have encountered a number of baptism records where a child was baptised on the day it was born, quite often where the record has been annotated with the letter 'P' - which I understand indicates a private (and possibly a bedside [rather than an in-Church]) baptism.

Such speedy baptisms were probably effected because the baby was not expected to thrive & survive - as could well have been the case where the birth was very premature.

If perchance you know the date that your grandmother was baptised there may be a helpful clue hidden there.

Willyam


6
World War One / Re: Shore leave from Royal Navy WW1 HMAS Sydney
« on: Thursday 18 November 21 12:12 GMT (UK)  »
Lisa,

Given that you posted your enquiry yesterday, which happened to be World Prematurity Day, have you considered the possibility that your grandmother might have been born prematurely - and thus she was conceived later than mid February 1917.

Willyam

7
Carmarthenshire / Re: Harold Williams Seymour Marriage
« on: Monday 12 July 21 18:01 BST (UK)  »
Also this, from the ‘marriages section’ of the Llanelly Mercury and South Wales Advertiser issue of 17th February 1910:

“SEYMOUR KNOWLES - Jan 29th, at Johannesburg, Harold William, second son of Mr Thomas Seymour, Pontyberem, to Muriel Gladys, third daughter of the late Mr G H Knowles, Pembrey, and Mrs Knowles, of St Andrew’s Road, Bedford, and grand-daughter of the late Mr John Swire, of Rock House, Pembrey.”

Willyam

8
Family History Beginners Board / Re: Did he make a will?
« on: Tuesday 06 July 21 10:26 BST (UK)  »
"Named in said Will Charles Greenhouse and Anne Elias Spinster the other Executors named in the said Will having renounced Probate thereof 21 June 1900"

Having experienced something similar, where the deceased had made a Will but one of the two named Executors had predeceased & the other had renounced, I subsequently came to understand the following.

Although the Will itself had undoubtedly been technically valid, because there were no Executors to apply for Probate it could not be proven thus leading to the issue of Letters of Administration.

As the consequence of this it would be expected that the assets of the Estate would still have been distributed as directed in the Will but, in this instance, by the appointed Administrator in the stead of the non-available (named) Executors.

Willyam

9
Armed Forces / Re: PLEASE HELP IDENTIFY ARMY UNIFORM
« on: Sunday 30 May 21 22:41 BST (UK)  »
You may already have picked up on this but it does potentially add a layer of mystery to your enquiry.

Although the uniform identification tends towards an earlier period, the words in the top corner of the photo appear to be an adaptation of part of Laurence Binyon's wonderful poem: 'For the Fallen' - which was penned in September 1914.

Willyam 

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