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Messages - avm228

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1
Sussex / Re: Advice on 2019 Death
« on: Sunday 21 November 21 21:15 GMT (UK)  »
Yes - should have maiden surname and date & place of birth (if known to the informant).

2
Occupation Interests / Re: Chancery QC
« on: Tuesday 09 November 21 18:09 GMT (UK)  »
Yes, it operated rather like an apprenticeship.

The Queen’s Bench was a common-law court, so as I mentioned was separate from the Court of Chancery at the relevant time.

Commissioner for Oaths was at the time (as you have seen) an additional role to that of the attorney/solicitor at the time, but now all practising solicitors and barristers are Commissioners for Oaths automatically, without any need for a specific appointment.

3
Occupation Interests / Re: Chancery QC
« on: Tuesday 09 November 21 16:31 GMT (UK)  »
Where do the words Chancery QC come into your document? QC is short for Queen’s Counsel - still used today for senior barristers who have been presented with Letters Patent by the Queen.

Chancery is (now) one of the divisions of the High Court, traditionally dealing with arrangements or disputes about property, trusts and taxes but now also encompassing business law. Before major reforms in the 1870s, the Court of Chancery was entirely separate from the common law courts. An “attorney” in the courts of common law was the same as a “solicitor” in the Court of Chancery. You probably know that they are all called solicitors now, though “attorney” is still used in certain other jurisdictions.

An aspiring attorney would then have had to pay an established lawyer for the right to train under him as his articled clerk. Often the payment would be made by the young man’s father. The resulting contract - the Articles of Clerkship - set out the respective rights and obligations of the parties for the duration of the training period.

4
London and Middlesex / Re: A marriage in Islington 1912
« on: Tuesday 02 November 21 11:51 GMT (UK)  »
You can search the 1939 Register by exact birthdate, and that is one of the features that makes it so useful. The birthday (day/month) seems to slip less frequently than the birth year.

Anyway I’m not seeing her unfortunately. I also can’t see a death of an Alice Evangeline Williams on the GRO website between 1913-1957, other than a 17 yr old (in Stockport, 1914) who isn’t yours.

5
London and Middlesex / Re: A marriage in Islington 1912
« on: Tuesday 02 November 21 11:20 GMT (UK)  »
Alice’s baptism shows that her birthdate was 3 October 1866. Have you tried filtering the 1939 Alice Williams by precise birthdate? Of course she may not have survived to 1939.

6
Wife’s daughter (dittoed for Johanna).

7
The Common Room / Re: Alban Gough and Estelle
« on: Wednesday 27 October 21 01:34 BST (UK)  »
Estelle’s maiden surname is indexed as Forestier on the registration of son Alban Patrick Gough’s birth, Mar qtr 1913 Marylebone.

The Forestier spelling looks consistent with her signature on the 1912 marriage.

8
The Common Room / Re: Alban Gough and Estelle
« on: Wednesday 27 October 21 01:21 BST (UK)  »
Sidney Alban Gough was born in the Bristol area (Barton Regis) in 1889. His 1959 probate entry shows that he was also known as Alban Butler Gough.

Parents were Joseph Gough and Elizabeth née Butler, married at Westbury on Trym, 10 Aug 1873.

9
The Common Room / Re: Alban Gough and Estelle
« on: Wednesday 27 October 21 01:06 BST (UK)  »
Married at Teddington Parish Church, 11 July 1912:

Alban Butler Gough 28 bach schoolmaster. Father: Alban Butler Gough (decd), gentleman.
Estelle Forrestier 22 spinster. Father: Arthur Forrestier (decd), gentleman.

Address for both bride & groom was 1 Ryde Villas, Kingston Rd.

Witnesses: Bertram Jellings; Ellen Kelly.

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