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Messages - Biko

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28
Lancashire / Re: Where Are My Worrall(Warrell) Family Manchester
« on: Saturday 07 June 08 19:18 BST (UK)  »
Who knows?

What area is Falkner Square?

30
Lancashire / Re: Conditions in Lancashire during the Cotton Famine
« on: Saturday 07 June 08 00:48 BST (UK)  »
http://www.dingquarry.co.uk/location--geography/cotton-famine-road.asp

Cotton Famine Road

Ongoing research by Ding Quarry protestors is confirming the historic importance of the upper sections Rooley Moor Road above the Spodden Valley, known for generations as the “Cotton Road” or “Cotton Famine Road”.

Many visitors to the tranquil Pennine moorland beyond Catley Lane Head are amazed to find a picturesque Victorian stone road untouched by the tarmac and concrete of the twentieth century. At an altitude of over 1500 feet this historic feature may also lay claim to being one of the highest roads in England. Enjoyed by walkers and cyclists, this moorland route also forms part of the Pennine Bridleway allowing safe access for horse riders on the Mary Townley Loop.

Reference to published work by local historians and research collated by the Local Studies Section of Touchstones reveal a connection between Rooley Moor and Lancashire Mill workers in their support of US President Lincoln and the Union cause in the American Civil War.

How did the “Cotton Famine Road” get its name?

The Union blockade of Confederate ports during the American Civil War led to shortages of raw cotton supplies to Lancashire- then the world’s leading producer of finished cotton goods. Although there were some supplies of Indian short staple and Egyptian cotton, the deficit caused by the lack of American supplies was described at the time as a “famine”. Such an emotive phrase could have been particularly poignant for the Irish migrants to Rochdale who had sought sanctuary in the mill town as a result of the “Potato Famine” a generation earlier. They had swapped the blighted fields of Ireland for Lancashire’s dark satanic mills. Unfortunately, in the troubled mid 1860s they were dependent on a factory system that was failing them.

Rochdale District had a mixed economy with wool and fustian textile production in addition to cotton. However, there remained significant hardship for many in the town as a result of the American Civil War:

As the battle of Gettysberg raged throughout 1863, the Rochdale (Poor Law) Union minutes recorded 19,374 town folk receiving “outdoor relief” – a quaint reference to the widespread poverty and starvation that was occurring. The police reports for 1864 show that many of the remaining cotton workers were on short time. In those days before the Welfare State, Rochdale, like many other Lancashire Districts, organised its own Cotton Famine Relief Fund.

Instead of siding with the cotton-producing Confederate States, many impoverished Lancashire cotton workers expressed support with the Union’s cause- in particular, with support for the abolition of slavery.

An explanation was offered by Karl Marx writing in the New York Daily Tribune on 14th March 1861:

'As long as the English cotton manufacturers depended on slave-grown cotton, it could truthfully be asserted that they rested on a twofold slavery, the indirect slavery of the white man in England and the direct slavery of the black men on the other side of the Atlantic.'

Rochdale has a long history of international solidarity with other working people. In 1844 our Rochdale Pioneers formed the modern structure of the Co-operative movement.

The Rochdale Observer on 13th March 1864 reported the following rousing address from Chartist orator Ernest Jones:

'I have not forgotten the men of Rochdale, their love of freedom and of truth, and I trust that those who are now struggling, honourably and constitutionally, for the freedom of the black will join in every effort for a fresh instalment towards the Charter of an Englishman's liberty (applause). Those who pat the slave-owners of America on the backs would like to be slave-owners in England too (cheers and hear! hear!)...I trust that we shall find that in establishing liberty universally throughout the American continent we shall be placing the crowning pinnacle on the edifice of freedom here as well'.

In September 1862 US President Lincoln had issued his Proclamation of Emancipation. On New Years Eve 1862, Lancashire cotton workers attended a public meeting at the Free Trade Hall in Manchester. A letter was drafted and sent to President Lincoln. An excerpt reads:

'...the vast progress which you have made in the short space of twenty months fills us with hope that every stain on your freedom will shortly be removed, and that the erasure of that foul blot on civilisation and Christianity - chattel slavery - during your presidency, will cause the name of Abraham Lincoln to be honoured and revered by posterity. We are certain that such a glorious consummation will cement Great Britain and the United States in close and enduring regards.'

31
Lancashire / Re: Where Are My Worrall(Warrell) Family Manchester
« on: Saturday 17 May 08 10:16 BST (UK)  »
Wow thanks once again

It is possible that he remarried.

But what convinces me that this is my Joseph is that he lives only a few streets away from Peter and the Fact that Peter isn't living with him in the 41 census.

I know Leaf St (went swimming there as a child) and part of it still exists

Born in Frodsham, same county as the son, also interesting who the granddaughter belongs to, also born in Cheshire.

I will follow this up and let you know what if anything I find.

Big Thanks

I think that only the older Joseph (born Hulme) is the child of Joseph Worrall, I believe all the others are Elizabeth children.

I did find last night Elizabeth Worrall in the 1871 Census still living at 10 Leaf St but with several lodgers. The only offspring is Ann Walsh (Welsh) age 31 and unmarried.

I also found a Death Index for Joseph Worrall in 1868. aged 69yrs

32
Lancashire / Re: Where Are My Worrall(Warrell) Family Manchester
« on: Friday 16 May 08 23:10 BST (UK)  »
Hi

Got them again.  That'll teach me.  First instinct!

1861
RG9/2888
Hulme
10 Leaf St
Joseph Worrell       M   H     60 Brewer's man              Frodsham Cheshire
Elizabeth   ,,          M  Wife  48    ,,     ,,  'swife            Burnage Lancashire
Ann Welch             un dau   21  Silk winder                 Salford  ,,
Joseph Jackson  ,,  un son   19   mechanical turner       ,,          ,, 
Ann Wilkeham gdaughter      7   scholar                      Cheshire   Runcorn.

Whar do you think?  There's evidently a second marriage if it is them.

I'll see what else I can see.

Emms

And this one...

1851 Salford Greengate Unfilmed   HO 107/2223  Page 55  Trans No B150  Shed 196

8 Welton St
WORRAL
Joseph         Head     M     48       Brewer Journeyman           Frodsham, Cheshire
Elizabeth     Wife       M     38                                                       Burnage
Joseph          Son      U      18      Mechanist Journeyman             Hulme
Mary             Dau      U       14      Silk Winder                               Salford
Ann               Dau               11                                                      Salford
Joseph ?       Son                 8       School                                      Salford

Sorry I had not realised they were not posted by the same user.

The evidence doesn't support this is my Joseph, re-married or not. I did find a marriage index for Joseph Worrall and Elizabeth Walsh in 1848 Manchester.

I assume that the question mark next to Joseph in the 1851 return  is a undefinable surname, different from the rest of the family?

Could it be that the grandchilds  surname is Wilkinson?

33
Lancashire / Re: Where Are My Worrall(Warrell) Family Manchester
« on: Friday 16 May 08 20:35 BST (UK)  »
Wow thanks once again

It is possible that he remarried.

But what convinces me that this is my Joseph is that he lives only a few streets away from Peter and the Fact that Peter isn't living with him in the 41 census.

I know Leaf St (went swimming there as a child) and part of it still exists

Born in Frodsham, same county as the son, also interesting who the granddaughter belongs to, also born in Cheshire.

I will follow this up and let you know what if anything I find.

Big Thanks

34
Lancashire / Re: Where Are My Worrall(Warrell) Family Manchester
« on: Wednesday 14 May 08 09:48 BST (UK)  »
Hello Bursy,

I know it as been a long time, but is your offer still open? If so can you look up a Joseph Worrall.

Unfortunately I know very little, other than he is Peter's father, possibly born in Cheshire.

On Peter and Eliza's marriage certificate his occupation is down as 'carter'. I belive he was living Hulme in 1851, but I could be wrong.

Thanks Marjie

35
Lancashire / Re: Ripon Street, Greenheys
« on: Monday 05 May 08 18:32 BST (UK)  »
Thanks Barberah I couldn't remember the title of the thread, and couldn't find it on the general page.

Although Rippon St still exist there are no buildings  on it, the whole area was cleared in the late 60's early 70's. As said, St Gerrard's backend covered one side of it, which is the only reason it is still there.

And it was always a short street. I can't swear by it but believe it was completely residential. Unless St Gerrard's was built post war(which I very much doubt) one side of the street would have been partially taken up by it's back wall.

I asked what religion because that area was predominately Irish Catholic, in which case the chances are they would have used Holy Name Church on Oxford Rd.

If you type in Denmark Road or Greenheys Lane  on Google Earth you will see Rippon St, litterally facing Moss Side police station, off Greenheys Lane.

36
Lancashire / Re: Ripon Street, Greenheys
« on: Monday 05 May 08 03:26 BST (UK)  »
Yes Ripon St is (still there) behind Denmark Rd. It lies behind what was called St Gerrards which was an old villa used for catholic services.  I imagine there was an older church of the same name in the area at some point.
There was also a C of E church, just as close. It stood  at the junction with Greenheys Lane, Denmark Rd and Carlton St....I think it was called St Clements, maybe others who knew the area can tell you the name

And there were several churches on Lloyd St(all within walking distance) and one on Carter St, between Rippon St and Lloyd St.

But it depends on what period you are talking of, as there were quite a few churches in the area...There is a Map showing Rippon St somewhere on this site, I will post a link when I find it.

It would also be useful to know what denomination you are seeking.

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