Author Topic: Use of Alias  (Read 2826 times)

Offline rosanne

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Use of Alias
« on: Friday 27 August 04 04:59 BST (UK) »
I'm trying to trace a Mary Eliza Kidson who married a Maxwell in the "army"?. I have found a marriage certificate with a Mary Ann Kidson who married a John Brown alias Maxwell who was a gunner at Eastney Barracks. What are the chances these are the same people? Why would names be changed and alias be used. Has anyone come across this sort of thing before?
Maxwell, Kidson, Beckett, Byrne, Knight, Jeavons, Bitheway, Ellow, Ganly....Greater London and surrounds also Ireland

Offline suey

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Re: Use of Alias
« Reply #1 on: Friday 27 August 04 23:35 BST (UK) »

What year is this ?    Bear with me - I've read about this somewhere... I'll see if I can find an answer - unless someone beats me to it.

When looking at Military Records pre 1900 at Kew I know we found several who had given an alias.
Suey
All census lookups are Crown Copyright from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
Sussex - Knapp. Nailard. Potten. Coleman. Pomfrey. Carter. Picknell
Greenwich/Woolwich. - Clowting. Davis. Kitts. Ferguson. Lowther. Carvalho. Pressman. Redknap. Argent.
Hertfordshire - Sturgeon. Bird. Rule. Claxton. Taylor. Braggins

Offline rosanne

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Re: Use of Alias
« Reply #2 on: Saturday 28 August 04 03:23 BST (UK) »
 :) Thanks Suey, the year was 1881.
Maxwell, Kidson, Beckett, Byrne, Knight, Jeavons, Bitheway, Ellow, Ganly....Greater London and surrounds also Ireland

Offline suey

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Re: Use of Alias
« Reply #3 on: Saturday 28 August 04 17:34 BST (UK) »
Hi Rosanne

Before 1870 a man would sign up for 'life', which usually meant 21 years and he would serve until old age or wounds made him unfit for service.
After 1870 a man could join on a 'short -service engagement for 12 years, six years would be spent with the colours and six on the reserves list.  One of my rellies was one of these and was recalled to the colours for the 2nd Boer War.

I can't find the exact passage that I was referring to but it went something like this..
Army life was tough, pay was poor and also reduced for food and clothing, food was often poor also - a lot of chaps deserted or were discharged as unfit or for other reasons.  However some decided that life in the Army was prefereable and would re-enlist under an assumed name.
I guess the reasons for using another name are numerous.

How many other Mary Eliza Kidsons have you found ?
I think it's worth following up on these two, there can't be that many who married a man of the 'right' surname.

Good luck
Suey
All census lookups are Crown Copyright from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
Sussex - Knapp. Nailard. Potten. Coleman. Pomfrey. Carter. Picknell
Greenwich/Woolwich. - Clowting. Davis. Kitts. Ferguson. Lowther. Carvalho. Pressman. Redknap. Argent.
Hertfordshire - Sturgeon. Bird. Rule. Claxton. Taylor. Braggins


Offline rosanne

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Re: Use of Alias
« Reply #4 on: Sunday 29 August 04 02:52 BST (UK) »
Thanks again Suey,
Well I am becoming more positive about these two. My GGrandmother, their daughter I have found and she was born (7 months) after this marriage and in this area. I know she is a definite just need to order her birth certificate and then I guess the link can be confirmed or not!
Rosanne
Maxwell, Kidson, Beckett, Byrne, Knight, Jeavons, Bitheway, Ellow, Ganly....Greater London and surrounds also Ireland

Offline suey

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Re: Use of Alias
« Reply #5 on: Sunday 29 August 04 14:41 BST (UK) »

Sounds like you're on to a winner Rosanne - let us know the outcome with the Birth Cert - I've got my fingers crossed  :)
Suey
All census lookups are Crown Copyright from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
Sussex - Knapp. Nailard. Potten. Coleman. Pomfrey. Carter. Picknell
Greenwich/Woolwich. - Clowting. Davis. Kitts. Ferguson. Lowther. Carvalho. Pressman. Redknap. Argent.
Hertfordshire - Sturgeon. Bird. Rule. Claxton. Taylor. Braggins

Offline Nick B

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Re: Use of Alias
« Reply #6 on: Saturday 11 December 04 19:09 GMT (UK) »
I'm interested in how the word 'alias' was used as well. I first came across this in wills from the 1600s, for example with names given as Smith als. Jones, where 'als' means 'alias'.

My guess is that 'alias' was used here to show changed surnames for women - i.e. maiden, married, re-married surnames to be sure of identifying the right person in a legal document like a will. But would male surnames change: for example if a mother remarried would a son change his surname to that of his step-father?

I think the modern interpretation of 'alias' is that it implies one of the names to be false; maybe that wasn't so previously?
One-name study of the Gallett family

Census Information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline casalguidi

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Re: Use of Alias
« Reply #7 on: Saturday 11 December 04 19:46 GMT (UK) »
Hi

I've come across the usage of "alias" a number of times during my research.  The instances which have interested me personally have resulted in 2 conclusions (mostly early 1800s):

1) due to an illegitimate birth and using the surnames of both father and mother at different times.

2) the result of a mother remarrying and the child using their true name and their stepfather's name.

Aliases are also used frequently in travelling families and it is usually found that the alias is the result of an illegitimate birth (as above), the maiden name of the wife or the maiden name of the mother of either spouse.  When I first started asking questions about my own family, I was told that my great grandfather had two aliases apart from his true surname - further research led me to uncover that these aliases were the maiden surname of his mother and the maiden surname of his mother in law.

Casalguidi
Census information is Crown Copyright http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline suey

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Re: Use of Alias
« Reply #8 on: Sunday 12 December 04 09:12 GMT (UK) »

1) due to an illegitimate birth and using the surnames of both father and mother at different times.

2) the result of a mother remarrying and the child using their true name and their stepfather's name.


I have instances of both of these in my tree, 1) Nailard/Napp - I call him 'make yer mind up Jim' as he swopped surnames at random and 2) My Thomas Coleman/Bridger who I finally cottoned on yesterday was one and the same chap !
Suey
All census lookups are Crown Copyright from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
Sussex - Knapp. Nailard. Potten. Coleman. Pomfrey. Carter. Picknell
Greenwich/Woolwich. - Clowting. Davis. Kitts. Ferguson. Lowther. Carvalho. Pressman. Redknap. Argent.
Hertfordshire - Sturgeon. Bird. Rule. Claxton. Taylor. Braggins