Author Topic: Anyone know what flette means?  (Read 2462 times)

Offline Viktoria

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,119
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Anyone know what flette means?
« Reply #18 on: Wednesday 06 February 19 10:43 GMT (UK) »
I wonder if it was Fleet,spelling was a bit haphazard in those days.
There was a river Fleet in London of course and perhaps one near the place
you are interested in.
But it talks about heraldry,arms  —-Argent, a Wolfe passant sable.
Silver -a black wolf walking to the right with paw raised to the right.

Try looking for those terms  as they could be that family’s arms.
Viktoria.

RootsChat is the busiest, largest free family history forum site in the country. It is completely free to use. Register now.
Also register instantly with Facebook or Twitter (and other social networks). Start your genealogy search now.


Offline ShaunJ

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 15,888
    • View Profile
Re: Anyone know what flette means?
« Reply #19 on: Wednesday 06 February 19 12:35 GMT (UK) »
"Guardian of the Fleet" seems likely.

Here's a reference to that office from 1627:  https://goo.gl/gD3xyQ
UK Census info. Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

RootsChat is the busiest, largest free family history forum site in the country. It is completely free to use. Register now.
Also register instantly with Facebook or Twitter (and other social networks). Start your genealogy search now.


Offline Mart 'n' Al

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,249
  • Martin H. Watson Gedmatch DNA Kit H062246
    • View Profile
Re: Anyone know what flette means?
« Reply #20 on: Wednesday 06 February 19 12:55 GMT (UK) »
It's probably totally unconnected but a Fletcher is the person who makes the feathers at the back end of arrows.

Martin
Gedmatch DNA Kit H062246.
FT-DNA Kit B388093

Names:
Loughborough and Loughbrough, (London, Hull, Pirton, Durham & Hartlepool);
Watson, (Bedlington, Jarrow & Hartlepool);
Ballard & Glassop (E. London); 
Leggett (Corton, Scarborough, Hartlepool); 
Young, Adamson & Wilson, (Hartlepool). 

I use GRAMPS v5.0 software. 

My ancestors are probably turning in their graves, not that I can actually find any of them.

Offline JenB

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 13,185
    • View Profile
Re: Anyone know what flette means?
« Reply #21 on: Wednesday 06 February 19 13:15 GMT (UK) »
The link to the original source material in reply #10 has expired, so here it is again
https://archive.org/details/visitationcount01mundgoog/page/n85
right-hand page, half way down.

It seems to to me that the reference 'garden of the flette' applies to the person in question, William Walsall.
All Census Look Ups Are Crown Copyright from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline Gardener

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,238
    • View Profile
Re: Anyone know what flette means?
« Reply #22 on: Thursday 07 February 19 14:06 GMT (UK) »
Interesting thoughts Andy. You have revived yet another old thread from 2004. :) Lets hope the OP returns to let you know if they have managed to solve the puzzle in the intervening years.

Nope. But I am amazed to see this pulled up after all these years. And thanks for the link to the Visitation book. At least the com. was cleared up. Obviously it means county.

I'm still interested in the Wolloxalls (in all their spellings). I never worked out exactly where the original hamlet was. It is used interchangeably or in conjunction with Langley, and was connected to Hales manor and then the Abbey. But there is quite a bit of landscape in between.
Rose (Black Country),Downs (Black Country),Wolloxall (any and all),Bark (Derbyshire),Wright (Derbyshire),Marsden (Derbyshire), Wallace (Black Country)

All census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline ShaunJ

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 15,888
    • View Profile
Re: Anyone know what flette means?
« Reply #23 on: Thursday 07 February 19 14:16 GMT (UK) »
Quote
"Guardian of the Fleet" seems likely.

Here's a reference to that office from 1627:  https://goo.gl/gD3xyQ

Reading that 1627 law case it is clear that the title "Guardian of the Fleet" refers to the guardian or warden of the Fleet Prison, not a fleet of ships. 
UK Census info. Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline ShaunJ

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 15,888
    • View Profile
Re: Anyone know what flette means?
« Reply #24 on: Thursday 07 February 19 14:23 GMT (UK) »
UK Census info. Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline Flattybasher9

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 3,062
  • Manners cost nothing, and are worth the effort.
    • View Profile
Re: Anyone know what flette means?
« Reply #25 on: Thursday 07 February 19 14:30 GMT (UK) »
There are several definitions of "flette" depending which language one chooses,

http://www.rootschat.com/links/01ndg/

take your pick.

Malky

Offline Gardener

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,238
    • View Profile
Re: Anyone know what flette means?
« Reply #26 on: Thursday 07 February 19 16:01 GMT (UK) »
I think at some point I decided that "Wollashall" was probably related to Walsall rather than Wolloxall. Interesting how names and place names changed.
Rose (Black Country),Downs (Black Country),Wolloxall (any and all),Bark (Derbyshire),Wright (Derbyshire),Marsden (Derbyshire), Wallace (Black Country)

All census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk