Author Topic: Dolphinholme Village nr Lancaster  (Read 25875 times)

Offline keenbutconfused

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Dolphinholme Village nr Lancaster
« on: Thursday 02 March 06 00:34 GMT (UK) »
Hi ...bit of an odd posting but it occurred to me that, although all of my own research is in Durham and Northumberland, there might be some little thing I could do to assist people whose own ancestors come fom where i am now.

I live in Dolphinholme - a small village outside Lancaster - but at one time it had over 2000 residents, working in 2 mills.  I have some info on the history of the village and would be more than happy to take digital photos of it for anyone who has a link with it.

Hope it might be of some assistance and in some way repay the help I've had from others on this site.
Joice, Coburn, Fairs - Easington, Durham villages, Jarrow, Hebburn, Monkwearmouth, Chester le Street, Gateshead, Haswell....she was only a coal miner's daughter (well, grand-daughter)

Offline DorothyMH

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Re: Dolphinholme
« Reply #1 on: Sunday 13 May 07 20:48 BST (UK) »
Hello,

I am helping a work colleague research their family history and have found an ancestor who says he was born in Dolphinhulme.

William STEWART circa 1833.  I think he is one of the sons of John STEWART and Ellen PARKINSON who were living at Cockerham on the 1841 census.  John is stated to be a shopkeeper.

If this is the right couple then they should have baptised a son James, as well as children Jane, John and William.  There may be others in between.

John and Ellen married at Cockerham on the 17th November 1814.

Any help or suggestions how to find the baptisms would be very useful - I know that Dolphinhulme church wasn't built at the time of William's birth.

Thanks,

Dot

Offline keenbutconfused

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Re: Dolphinholme
« Reply #2 on: Thursday 24 May 07 18:20 BST (UK) »
Hi, and apologies for the delay in responding to your post.  I suspect that the baptisms would have been conducted at Cockerham Parish Church but possibly at Ellel Church.  I have copied a bit from a book I have below, which may prove helpful.  If you would like me to photocopy it or take any photographs for you, please let me know and I will be pleased to do so.

Extract from 'A Short History of Dolphinholme' by the Rev A. R. Denne, BA - Vicar of Dolphinholme 1965.

'Before the coming of the mill, the site of the present village of Dolphinholme was partly in the ancient parish of St Helen's, Churchtown, or Garstang, and partly in that of St Michael's, Cockerham.  As for hte latter church, it had long possessed one or two chapels of ease, built for the convenience of th einhabitants of th eoutlying parts of the large parish, and one of these was at Elll.  This would have served the scattered farmimg community of what we now call dolphinholme, before the coming of the larger population, at the end of the C18th. ....
 .... At first, services were held in th eschoolromm in th elower art of the village.  They consisted chielfy of an afternoon service on Sundays.  Once a quarter, the congregation would assemble at the schoolroom and march in procession to Shires head Old Church, also a chapel of ease for Cockerham.  There was no facility for th einternment of the dead at Dolphinholme, this would have to be done at either Shires Head, Galgate (Ellel) or Cokerham.  It seems that the sacrament of baptism was administered for a short while in the building which served for worship, fo rthe entries in the old register begin on Friday 10th 1838.'

 Here is a pic of part of the village - it hasn't changed much ....
Joice, Coburn, Fairs - Easington, Durham villages, Jarrow, Hebburn, Monkwearmouth, Chester le Street, Gateshead, Haswell....she was only a coal miner's daughter (well, grand-daughter)


Offline keenbutconfused

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Re: Dolphinholme
« Reply #3 on: Thursday 24 May 07 18:24 BST (UK) »
Sorry - posted before I meant to!  I also meant to say - hope that is helpful - if I might be able to help with anything else, please shout.   :)
Joice, Coburn, Fairs - Easington, Durham villages, Jarrow, Hebburn, Monkwearmouth, Chester le Street, Gateshead, Haswell....she was only a coal miner's daughter (well, grand-daughter)

Offline Barbara.H

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Re: Dolphinholme Village nr Lancaster
« Reply #4 on: Tuesday 31 July 07 10:23 BST (UK) »
Why is it called Dolphinholme? Its a long way from the sea!
Although I am trying to find my Fishwick family and they are a long way from the sea too.  Found a possible link with Fishwicks in Bradford, Yorkshire, and one of them was born in Dolphinholme.
 :) Barbara
LANCS:  Greenwood, Greenhalgh, Fishwick, Berry,
CHES/DERBYS:  Vernon
YORKS/LINCS: Watson, Stamford, Bartholomew,
Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline DorothyMH

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Re: Dolphinholme Village nr Lancaster
« Reply #5 on: Tuesday 31 July 07 18:44 BST (UK) »
It's scandanavian -quote -The unusual name of the village of Dolphinholme derives from an ancient Scandinavian settlement and has nothing to do with the marine mammal! In 1784 the first mechanised worsted spinning mill was established here, and a factory village grew up around this early industrial site. That mill closed in 1865, but another, Corless Mill, continued working until 1926.

Hope this helps!

Dot

Offline Jackie464

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Re: Dolphinholme Village nr Lancaster
« Reply #6 on: Wednesday 01 August 07 08:46 BST (UK) »
Hi - I would love to see your history of Dolphinholme.  My Parkinson family came from there originally, and I believe my 4 x great grandmother Ellen Barrow (mar. Thomas Parkinson) was also born there.

I grew up and lived most of my life near Overton and have loads of history and photos etc of Lancaster and area, but not of Dolphinholme.

Have you put the history you have on a website.  If not - it would be a great idea.  There is a wonderful one of Caldervale that is extremely well used.

I live in Chehire now but am visiting the Lancaster area tomorrow till Sunday. - Jackie

Offline DorothyMH

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Re: Dolphinholme Village nr Lancaster
« Reply #7 on: Wednesday 01 August 07 18:31 BST (UK) »
Hello Barbara - not my work but from a site already on the Internet -http://www.lancashirechurches.co.uk/dolphinh.htm

and two more pieces from the Frances Frith website which has pictures for sale:

Selected extracts from books on Dolphinholme & Lancashire
The name Corless is associated with the family who lived at Springfield House, Pilling. James Derham owned Corless Mill in Nether Wyresdale, 6 miles from Lancaster, and in 1801 he manufactured gas to light the mill and his workers' cottages. Dolphinholme was the first village to be lit by gas, and its first gas lamp is preserved at Derham House. At its peak the mill employed 1400 people, who worked shifts, day and night. Four hundred of these workers combed wool in their homes at Forton, Scorton and Nether Wyresdale. The lavish use of stone in these cottages (it came from quarries at Tootle Heights near Longridge) was made possible by the plentiful supply in those days. This 19th-century terrace is typical of Lancashire villages in this region backed by long ridges of Pennine hills. It is identical to Club Row in Longridge, which only came about through the tenacity of twenty Lancashire quarry workers who saved up and built the terrace.
Taken from: Lancashire Villages Photographic Memories

These 18th-century stone cottages were built for workers at the nearby mill, which was originally water-driven - its wheel was second only in size to that of Laxey on the Isle of Man. In 1811, the village and factory were amongst the first to be lit by gas, and in 1822 the mill was converted to steam.
Taken from: Lancashire Living Memories

Finally Genuki has a page with information on Dolphinholme -
http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/LAN/NetherWyresdale/

regards,

Dot

Offline Barbara.H

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Re: Dolphinholme Village nr Lancaster
« Reply #8 on: Thursday 02 August 07 13:13 BST (UK) »
Thanks Dot,
The Bradford-based Fishwick from Dolphinholme was a wool comber, so the occupations connect nicely. I hope he does turn out to be one of mine, as I now live in Lancaster myself. Would be nice to find rellies that are only a bus ride away for a change!
 :) Barbara
LANCS:  Greenwood, Greenhalgh, Fishwick, Berry,
CHES/DERBYS:  Vernon
YORKS/LINCS: Watson, Stamford, Bartholomew,
Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk