Author Topic: Edward Henry Collingworth, Death C. 1872  (Read 18123 times)

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Offline Daniel Collingwood

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an uncle of a cousin's father...
« Reply #28 on: Wednesday 03 July 13 00:08 BST (UK) »
Journal of the Pembrokeshire Historical Society  - Vol. 9 2000 Some Pembrokeshire sea officers
           

Two Pembrokeshire midshipmen were in HMS Victory with Lord Nelson.
Of Robert Cutts Barton little is known except that he was born in the
county in 1785 and joined HMS Victory off Toulon on 31 July 1803 from
the frigate HMS Amphion in which he had gone out from Britain. Two
weeks after Trafalgar he transferred to HMS Queen 98, flagship of Admiral
Collingwood. He was promoted lieutenant in 1806 and served in the boats
of the Apollo cutting out a convoy in Rosas Bay in 1809. Barton was made
a commander in 1819 and died aged 42 at Bideford in 1827.102
The other Pembrokeshire midshipman in HMS Victory, Francis Edward
Collingwood, born at Milford on 23 March 1785, is immortalised in Arthur
Devis' famous painting of the death of Nelson. The Admiral's biographer,
Carola Oman,103 records that some midshipmen, walking wounded, were
being treated in the cockpit where Nelson lay dying. In the painting
Collingwood is shown standing in the background with Lieutenant Yule,
'their British bulk and complexions contrasting with those of the Admiral's
wizened, whiskered Neopolitan valet'.104
Collingwood was the son of 'Francis Collingwood of Greenwich Esq. by
Sarah, sister of Captain Thomas Richbell RN, Chief Magistrate of the
Thames Police'.105 His grandfather, Edward Collingwood, had been Master
Attendant at Plymouth, Portsmouth, Chatham and Deptford Dockyards.
After serving in sloops and frigates, and in Foley's old Nile command,
HMS Goliath, Collingwood joined HMS Victory at Spithead on 14 Sep-
tember 1805, the month before Trafalgar. Young Collingwood has long
been reputed to have been the avenger of the death of Nelson by having
shot the French sharpshooter in the rigging of the Redoutable. This dis-
tinction was, however, claimed by a fellow midshipman, John Pollard, then
in retirement at the Royal Naval Hospital, Greenwich, in a letter to The
Times on 13 May 1863 in which he said that Collingwood had been with
him on the poop of the flagship but for a short time only:
It is true my old shipmate, Collingwood, who has now been dead
some years, did come in the poop for a short time. I had discovered
the men crowding in the tops of the Redoutable, and pointed them
out to him, when he took up a musket and fired once; then he left
the poop, I conclude, to return to his station on the quarter deck. I
remained firing until there was not a man to be seen in the top ....cont

http://welshjournals.llgc.org.uk/browse/viewpage/llgc-id:1165908/llgc-id:1166683/llgc-id:1166695/getText

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: EDWARD HENRY COLLINGWOOD, DEATH C. 1872
« Reply #29 on: Wednesday 23 October 13 23:46 BST (UK) »
EDWARD HENRY COLLINGWOOD, 1817 - 1878

     TODAY is the 135th anniversary of his death in Hong Kong. October 24th 1878.
 Died from fever from exposure while fixing storm damage on Dharwar

http://goo.gl/eI3gTr


William Inkster 10 years later in 1888 was on his last voyage on the Dharwar.
He saved the ship from certain disaster by making good the ships damaged steering gear
in a devasting storm.
He became famous in his day as the shipwright that saved the Dharwar!

When not at sea both William Inkster and Edward Henry Collingwood worked as part time
firemen.
http://goo.gl/OfHRee


Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: EDWARD HENRY COLLINGWOOD, DEATH C. 1872
« Reply #30 on: Friday 14 November 14 01:25 GMT (UK) »
I am currently researching my ancestors and as yet have nothing more to add at this stage, though some interesting accounts of my father have emerged during his 13yrs (1931-1944) as a Merchant Seaman, Alfred Daniel Collingwood,1914-1965 sailed US 1942-1944, Merchant CONVOY ships, Sourabaya, Ile de France, Empire MacMahon, British Merchant, Mauretania, Sphinx

http://uboat.net/allies/merchants/ship.html?shipID=2302

To find passengers and crews sailing to NY...REGISTER, then open links to ships manifest.
http://www.libertyellisfoundation.org/passenger-details/czoxMzoiOTAxMTg2Nzc5NDMwMiI7/czo5OiJwYXNzZW5nZXIiOw==#passengerListAnchor

http://www.libertyellisfoundation.org/passenger-details/czoxMzoiOTAxMTg2Nzc5NDMwMiI7/czo5OiJwYXNzZW5nZXIiOw==#passengerListAnchor

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Francis Edward Collingwood- who avenged Nelson's death
« Reply #31 on: Friday 03 April 15 18:46 BST (UK) »
Edward Henry Collingwood - (1817 - 1878) was related to (distant nephew) Francis Edward Collingwood - (1785 - 1835) and his father Francis Collingwood and grandfather Edward that had connections to Greenwich and Chatham Dockyards. Our own family have researched the claims of John Pollard that he alone killed the French sniper on board the 'Redoubtable'. Coming forwards 40yrs after the event, writing to the 'Times' only suggests that Pollard was present but 'WHY' so many years after Collingwood died?
Arthur Devis's masterpiece depicting 'The Death of Nelson' (which is displayed in the Greenwich museum)was well researched and 'rough cartoons' of all the characters present were made at the time that Nelson was taken below decks to die. It was suggested at the time on board the Victory that witnesses saw one or two midshipmen crouching and firing at the French sniper. Collingwood who was 'rated' as a sharp-shot was also seen to be handed a loaded rifle and fire  a second or third shot. Witnesses said Collingwood then returned to his post when he saw the sniper first fall in to the mizen ropes that left him mortally wounded and dangling from the mast. Falling to the deck it was assumed Collingwood had fired the fatal shot?

http://welshjournals.llgc.org.uk/browse/viewpage/llgc-id:1165908/llgc-id:1166683/llgc-id:1166695/getText

Two Pembrokeshire midshipmen were in HMS Victory with Lord Nelson.
Of Robert Cutts Barton little is known except that he was born in the
county in 1785 and joined HMS Victory off Toulon on 31 July 1803 from
the frigate HMS Amphion in which he had gone out from Britain. Two
weeks after Trafalgar he transferred to HMS Queen 98, flagship of Admiral
Collingwood. He was promoted lieutenant in 1806 and served in the boats
of the Apollo cutting out a convoy in Rosas Bay in 1809. Barton was made
a commander in 1819 and died aged 42 at Bideford in 1827.102
The other Pembrokeshire midshipman in HMS Victory, Francis Edward
Collingwood, born at Milford on 23 March 1785, is immortalised in Arthur
Devis' famous painting of the death of Nelson. The Admiral's biographer,
Carola Oman,103 records that some midshipmen, walking wounded, were
being treated in the cockpit where Nelson lay dying. In the painting
Collingwood is shown standing in the background with Lieutenant Yule,
'their British bulk and complexions contrasting with those of the Admiral's
wizened, whiskered Neopolitan valet'.104
Collingwood was the son of 'Francis Collingwood of Greenwich Esq. by
Sarah, sister of Captain Thomas Richbell RN, Chief Magistrate of the
Thames Police'.105 His grandfather, Edward Collingwood, had been Master
Attendant at Plymouth, Portsmouth, Chatham and Deptford Dockyards.
After serving in sloops and frigates, and in Foley's old Nile command,
HMS Goliath, Collingwood joined HMS Victory at Spithead on 14 Sep-
tember 1805, the month before Trafalgar. Young Collingwood has long
been reputed to have been the avenger of the death of Nelson by having
shot the French sharpshooter in the rigging of the Redoutable. This dis-
tinction was, however, claimed by a fellow midshipman, John Pollard, then
in retirement at the Royal Naval Hospital, Greenwich, in a letter to The
Times on 13 May 1863 in which he said that Collingwood had been with
him on the poop of the flagship but for a short time only:
It is true my old shipmate, Collingwood, who has now been dead
some years, did come in the poop for a short time. I had discovered
the men crowding in the tops of the Redoutable, and pointed them
out to him, when he took up a musket and fired once; then he left
the poop, I conclude, to return to his station on the quarter deck. I
remained firing until there was not a man to be seen in the top last one I saw coming down the mizzen rigging, and he fell from my
fire also. King, the quartermaster, was killed while in the act of
handing me a parcel of ballcartridge, long after Collingwood had
left the poop. I remained there till some time after the action was
concluded, assisting in rigging the jurymast; then I was ushered into
the wardroom, where Sir Thomas Hardy and other officers were
assembled, and complimented by them as the person who avenged
Lord Nelson's death.
Modern historians have tended to support Pollard but the issue remains
unclear and the Milford officer may well have had a hand in avenging his
Commander-in-Chief.106 After the Redoutable surrendered Collingwood led
a party across from the Victory to tackle fires which threatened to destroy
this major French prize, 'which service he performed in a manner highly
satisfactory.' He was promoted lieutenant in January 1806.
Collingwood subsequently saw much active service. He was 'constantly
employed' in the Walcheren Expedition in 1809 and was twice wounded
when in command of the revenue cutter Kite on the Irish coast in the
1820's. In 1822 he married Ellen, daughter of the Rev. Samuel Collis of Co.
Kerry. His sister was the wife of Dr J.D. Burke, Surgeon of Pembroke
Dockyard. Collingwood was made a commander in 1828 and died aged 50
at Tralee in 1835.

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: EDWARD HENRY COLLINGWOOD, DEATH C. 1872
« Reply #32 on: Sunday 18 October 15 00:11 BST (UK) »
I have not posted on this thread since 3/April/15 mainly due to the date of Edward Henry's   death was 24th October 1878 in Old Hong Kong and NOT 1872 as the heading suggests.

I had started another thread which has been viewed nearly 9,000 times. Please be free to add any comments.

http://goo.gl/h4Hu5x
 


Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: EDWARD HENRY COLLINGWOOD, DEATH C. 1872
« Reply #33 on: Friday 15 July 16 23:15 BST (UK) »
Margaret Collingwood-sister of the prosecutor**

Q. If these persons were of that character, what made you go there?
Elizabeth Tod. I was but a child when he lodged at my father's house.
Jury. We should be glad to know what Mrs. Collingwood's husband is?
Collingwood. My husband is master of a Guinea-man .
Jury. Where do you live?
Collingwood. In Queen's-Square, Ratcliff-Highway .
Jury. Why was it improper for him to come to your house?
Collingwood. I thought it improper.
Jury. For what reason.
Collingwood. Why then, Gentlemen of the Jury, I will tell you. My husband has been gone these six years, trading on the coast of Guinea; and he being gone so long I was forced to take a lodging, and take in plain work, and go out to ironing. As to my sister, she lives in a very creditable manner, I do assure you.

Guilty - sentenced to transportation
.
** - the prosecutor in those times was the victim giving evidence against the prisoner charged.


http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t17480526-18-person216&div=t17480526-18#highlight

Margaret Collingwood
- husband a master mariner(Guinea coast), resided at Queens Sq, Ratcliffe Highway,  leading off Farthing Fields. Highly probable that this is the mother of (Edward?)the Sawyer, b 1737 ? and apprenticed (about 1750 aged 13yrs -1757)?

John the Guinea-man was most certainly master of a 'slave-trader'. His wife Margaret said at the OLD BAILEY...."He has been gone these past six years and i have been forced to take in 'ironing and plain work'. If he died at sea (or soon after his return) his son Edward would have qualified for an apprenticeship from either his father's legacy or Mrs Wiseman's Bequest (will) to be son of a deceased shipwright or master mariner.


04 Jan 1737   Christened    John COLLINGWOOD son of John & Margaret.   Stepney, St. Dunstan         1736/37 age 28 days, father ships' fitter and upholsterer of Ratcliffe
Ships' outfitters were usually master tradesmen skilled in all aspects of of ship's fittings and were often skilled as shipwrights, sailmakers, etc. These skills were often required before a mariner could manage a ship as 'Master' or Master Mariner.

16 Dec 1757    Edward John COLLINGWOOD   Woolwich Yard KEN    TNA   Foreman's apprentice to John Puckley of Woolwich yard; duty 9s paid @ 6d on 18/-/- on 24 Dec 1757 

Oct 1764   Married    Edward COLLINGWOOD husband of Elizabeth POINTER   Limehouse, St. Anne     

Edward John's children......

15 Jan 1773   Christened    John COLLINGWOOD son of Edward & Elizabeth.   Stepney, St. Dunstan         age 2 days, father a sawyer of Poplar >>>>died in infancy.......

.....01 Aug 1773   Buried    John COLLINGWOOD   Stepney, St. Dunstan  of Poplar, buried at Ratcliffe? infant aged 9months?
 
17 Jul 1774   Christened    Elizabeth Mary COLLINGWOOD daughter of Edward & Elizabeth   Stepney, St. Dunstan       age 28 days, father a sawyer of Poplar

18 Aug 1776   Christened    John Edward COLLINGWOOD son of John Edward & Elizabeth.   Stepney, St. Dunstan     age 13 days, father a sawyer of Poplar
                          (John Edward the Ropemaker 1776 - 1821 age 45yrs)
 
John the ropemaker's children....

01 Jul 1804   Christened    John COLLINGWOOD son of John & Elizabeth   Stepney, St Dunstan MDX                                                                             father a ropemaker of Poplar
 
01 Oct 1806   Christened   Mary COLLINGWOOD dau of John & Elizabeth   Stepney, Saint Dunstan MDX     

05 Mar 1809   Christened    George Edward COLLINGWOOD son of John & Elizabeth   Stepney, St. Dunstan                      born 3 Jan 1809, father a ropemaker of Poplar

12 Feb 1815   Christened    James William COLLINGWOOD son of John Edward & Elizabeth   Limehouse, St. Anne            born 18 Jan 1815, father a ropemaker of Limehouse

05 Aug 1817   Christened    EDWARD HENRY COLLINGWOOD son of John Edward & Elizabeth   Limehouse, St. Anne         born 5 Jul 1817, father a ropemaker of Limehouse 

Edward Henry Collingwood; born 5 July 1817, christened at St. Anne, Limehouse, MDX.

He married 3 March 1840 at Poplar, MDX Ann Merritt.
  Children:   1842:   Edward Robert Collingwood
1843:   Frederick Henry Collingwood ...1846 -  Alfred Daniel Collingwood
1849:   Sarah Ann Collingwood  .......1853 -  James Thomas Collingwood
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Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: EDWARD HENRY COLLINGWOOD, DEATH C. 1872
« Reply #34 on: Friday 15 July 16 23:48 BST (UK) »
William Parker married Jane Collingwood on December 28, 1766. Jane Collingwood was born about 1740 and died about 1815. Her father was Captain Edward Collingwood, who was born about 1694 and died July 13, 1779 in Greenwich, England.

Parents
Edward Collingwood
1660-1721
Mary Bigge
1663-Unknown
Spouse(s)
Mary Rodham
1700-1783
Jane Carlton
1712-1791

Children
Winifred Collingwood
1744-Unknown
Carlton Collingwood
1746-1871
John Trevor Collingwood
1738-1796
Jane Collingwood
1740-1815
Edward Collingwood
1743-1809
Francis Collingwood 
1745-1799

 {Francis Edward Collingwood  of Trafalgar 1785-1835 was the son of 'Francis Collingwood of Greenwich Esq. by
Sarah, sister of Captain Thomas Richbell RN, Chief Magistrate of the
Thames Police. His grandfather, Edward Collingwood, had been Master
Attendant at Plymouth, Portsmouth, Chatham and Deptford Dockyards. His great Grandfather was Captain Edward Collingwood, 1660-1721}

Susannah Collingwood
1748-1818

Many Collingwoods' made the connections from Ratcliffe and Wapping as they moved to the ship building yards, sawmills and roperies of Woolwich, Greenwich and Deptford shipyards. This should prove interesting and may lead us to the ship building yards and sawmills and roperies. The line from Edward Henry the shipwright through John the ropemaker looks likely that 'cousins' will make the connection to Francis Edward Collingwood and his lineage to to Admiral Cuthbert Collingwood.


 Edward was the son of Edward Collingwood (born about 1660 and died in 1721) and Mary Bigge (born about 1663). Captain Collingwood married twice. His first marriage was to Mary Rodham and his second to Jane Carlton. Jane Carlton was born about 1712 in Greenwich and died February 19, 1791 at the Royal Naval Hospital in Greenwich, England. Jane Collingwood was the daughter of Edward Collingwood by his second wife, Jane Carlton.

Admiral Sir William Parker was the eldest. His sister Sarah, was christened March 11, 1744 at Queenborough, Kent. She died unmarried December 4, 1791. A brother Augustine was christened Feb 9,1746 at Queenborough. A sister, Elizabeth Parker, was born October 11, 1748 at Queenborough, Kent, England. She married William Head on July 19, 1785 in Queenborough. A child named Elizabeth Head was born February 9, 1787 also at Queenborough, Kent, England. Another sister Susannah was born and died 1750. A younger brother, Capt. Robert Parker of HMS Intrepid was born April 8, 1753 and died Nov 23, 1797. He married and had 8 children

William and Jane Collingwood Parker had seven daughters and one son. The daughters were named Jane, Sarah, Susanna, Harriet, Ann, Mary and Elizabeth. Harriet is the only daughter who never married. The only son, William George, was born in 1787. He married August 29, 1808, Elizabeth Still, (born 1791)the daughter of James Charles Still of East Knoyle in County Wiltshire and Charlotte Wake. He left a large family and died a vice admiral March 24, 1848.( This information from the book "A Naval Biographical Dictionary" by W.R. O'Byrne published in 1849.) One of the daughters of William George Parker and Elizabeth Still was Fanny Catharine who married Charles Bligh in 1837 and died in 1894. One daughter was named Clara and another daughter, Elizabeth Charlotte was born in 1816 in England. Two of the sons married in Toronto. Melville Parker married Jesse Hector in 1847 and Albert Parker married Lucy Henrietta Jennings in 1851.

The second Admiral Sir William Parker lived from 1781 to 1866 and served as Admiral of the Fleet. He was born on December 1, 1781, the third son of George Parker of Almington, Staffordshire, England. George Parker, his father, was the second son of Sir Thomas Parker, who had been lord chief baron of the exchequer. Sir Thomas Parker's nephew was John Jervis, first earl of St. Vincent, who had married Martha Parker, George Parker's half-sister.

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: EDWARD HENRY COLLINGWOOD, DEATH C. 1872
« Reply #35 on: Friday 15 July 16 23:54 BST (UK) »