Author Topic: Origins of the slang word Pikey  (Read 23835 times)

Offline An65

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Re: Origins of the slang word Pikey
« Reply #9 on: Saturday 16 September 06 20:09 BST (UK) »
Some worked on boats and barges for sure. The most important thing to them was the freedom to move.

Theres a lot of difference between Romany travellers (those descended from the original Indian people who went travelling 1000+ years ago) Irish Travellers, German Travellers, both of whom came in large waves to England, and latter day "new age" travellers.

However, saying that, theres a lot of intermarriage. Often, husbands became known by wives names because their families were higher up the pecking order. Often they travelled with relations. Often they took houses in the winter, or camped in one spot for the winter, only to take to the roads in the spring/summer and make their living at horse fairs/ hawking wares in villages/grinders and braziers/hop picking, etc etc.

I think bogga is probably right, it jolted something way down in my memory when I saw what he wrote. Trouble was, I never met the "real true travelling" Grays and Smiths, my mums mum (the Romany line) died when she was only 11 yeas of age of TB, along with most of her sisters. I did get to meet some of the great uncle travellers, and I did know my uncle very well, and he used to go drinking with them all, and work with them and the horses. However, my own nan married a Gorja, and they lived in brick houses, as do I. So my knowledge is far from complete.

Offline wheeldon

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Re: Origins of the slang word Pikey
« Reply #10 on: Saturday 16 September 06 20:23 BST (UK) »
Thanks Meles and An.

I asked about the boatmen as my Wood line were boatmen and I know very little about them.  Also one of my Wheeldons left home when he was 14 to work on the canals (I have him on the 1901 census living on a barge)

Gosh, I have an awful lot to learn  :-[ :)

Again, I hope you will excuse my ignorance when I pick your brains in the future.
Wheeldon  Derbyshire & Manchester
Willshaw Staffordshire & Manchester
Wilshaw Staffordshire & Manchester
Pugh Manchester, Haston, Hadwell, Shrewsbury, Shropshire
Patrick Coventry, Warwick, Foleshill
Kelly Dronmore County Down & Manchester
Stewart  Hilsborough County Down & Manchester
Moffatt/Moffitt County May &, Lancashire

Offline An65

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Re: Origins of the slang word Pikey
« Reply #11 on: Saturday 16 September 06 20:32 BST (UK) »
Wood / Woods is a gypsy name.
Just thought you might like to know that.


Offline An65

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Re: Origins of the slang word Pikey
« Reply #12 on: Saturday 16 September 06 20:37 BST (UK) »

Offline wheeldon

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Re: Origins of the slang word Pikey
« Reply #13 on: Saturday 16 September 06 21:02 BST (UK) »
I'll have a look at those links tomorrow, many thanks again.

My earliest Woods are from the early 1830s all listed as being boatmen.  Although it's a side that I haven't got round to do any serious research on.

It looks like I maybe combining researching my mates family and my own - result :D

Many thanks again

Fiona  :)
Wheeldon  Derbyshire & Manchester
Willshaw Staffordshire & Manchester
Wilshaw Staffordshire & Manchester
Pugh Manchester, Haston, Hadwell, Shrewsbury, Shropshire
Patrick Coventry, Warwick, Foleshill
Kelly Dronmore County Down & Manchester
Stewart  Hilsborough County Down & Manchester
Moffatt/Moffitt County May &, Lancashire

Offline wheeldon

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Re: Origins of the slang word Pikey
« Reply #14 on: Saturday 16 September 06 21:06 BST (UK) »
Oops, just wanted to add that I didn't know that Woods was Gypsy name - but I also wasn't sure if boatmen were gypsies - it does look like I have some Gypsy ancestors.

Wheeldon  Derbyshire & Manchester
Willshaw Staffordshire & Manchester
Wilshaw Staffordshire & Manchester
Pugh Manchester, Haston, Hadwell, Shrewsbury, Shropshire
Patrick Coventry, Warwick, Foleshill
Kelly Dronmore County Down & Manchester
Stewart  Hilsborough County Down & Manchester
Moffatt/Moffitt County May &, Lancashire

Offline Nick B

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Re: Origins of the slang word Pikey
« Reply #15 on: Saturday 16 September 06 22:51 BST (UK) »
I'd heard that "pikey' comes from turnpike - i.e. those who travelled the roads, or travellers. Naturally I've forgotten where I heard this...

Nick

One-name study of the Gallett family

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Offline An65

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Re: Origins of the slang word Pikey
« Reply #16 on: Saturday 16 September 06 23:10 BST (UK) »
regardless of the similarity and common sense that comes from "Pikey" and "turnpike" - roads..............
Piki is a word that is Romany, and Piki is a word thats been used against travellers, and its their own language.

Offline An65

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Re: Origins of the slang word Pikey
« Reply #17 on: Saturday 16 September 06 23:20 BST (UK) »
Piki - Pikey - its a Romany word used against them.

Gyppo/Gypsy - which comes from Egyptian, which is where they believed they came from, even tho their language (not written but spoken) derives from Sanskrit, which shows their roots lie not in Egypt, but in India. The diaspora of Indian travellers crosses the whole of Europe over the next 500 odd years, with the first Egyptian peoples mention during the reign of Henry VIII.

Its hard on travellers, and in very many ways they are the last "acceptable" racism. Its okay to call a traveller a Gyppo, or a Pikey, and thats why they are liable to fight over the fact it was said. The Romanies and Irish alike, prefer to be called only "Travellers" which disassociates them from their own heritage, and makes them no different to "new age" travellers, who may or may not be, descendants of "real" travelling families. its a sad sad state of affairs that they do this, to hide their true heritage.

I was lucky enough to spend time with Jim and Billie Bowers before they died, and learn of the old ways, and learn about the true horror of the rascism against romany folk.