Author Topic: Routes the Irish took to the U.K  (Read 3357 times)

Offline Welsh Jen

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Routes the Irish took to the U.K
« on: Tuesday 16 November 04 10:57 GMT (UK) »
There were three main streams of Irish migrants in Britain:

~From the Province of Ulster to Glasgow, Paisley and Kilmarnock on the west coast of Scotland and to Dundee in the east.

~From the central and western counties of Ireland, Kildare, Mayo and Roscommon, through Dublin and Drogheda to Liverpool and other Lancashire towns, and

~From the south western counties of Ireland Cork, Waterford and Limerick into South Wales and Bristol from there many then moved on to London at a later date.
 
These migrants continued to arrive in England, Wales & Scotland in the 1840s - 1860s.


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Offline Lady Macbeth

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Re: Routes the Irish took to the U.K
« Reply #1 on: Tuesday 16 November 04 12:12 GMT (UK) »
Hi, thanks for this helpful posting.
As you will know, a lot of Irish came from all over Ireland to Dundee to the jute mills (mine included).  Many of these were from the north from areas of weavers.  You mention Dundee, but do you happen to know if boats came direct to Dundee (obviously an important port for jute and whaling at the time) from Ireland, or whether the people came via the Clyde and across country?  Mine are from the north (somewhere!) and Co Offaly (Kings).
Many thanks
Lesley
Gegan, Geoghegan, Gagan, or any variation whatsoever in Ireland (particularly Co Offaly/Kings Co) and Scotland;
Symons and Symon in Angus, Perthshire and Aberdeenshire, Scotland;
McKenna in Ireland and Scotland;
Wilkie in Kincardine and Angus, Scotland

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Offline Welsh Jen

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Re: Routes the Irish took to the U.K
« Reply #2 on: Tuesday 16 November 04 12:36 GMT (UK) »
Hello Lady Macbeth! (great username)

Dundee was indeed a port of call for many of the migrants, who settled especially those working in the jute mills (like your ancestors) however how they traveled there is beyond me! geographically it does not make sense, the Irish influx to Dundee is less documented than it is on the west coast.  I would suppose much of their arrival was based on the employment they were used to as many Irish also had experience with employment in the textile and jute industries; they in all probability came from the Irish counties where linen and yarn were produced, such as Donegal, Londonderry, Monaghan, Sligo and Tyrone.

Have you contacted Dundee Archives? They would definitely have many resources on this subject: http://www.dundee.ac.uk/archives/ship01.htm and could possibly give you a better answer than I with respect of how they arrived in Dundee.

I hope some of this has helped you.
 :)



Offline Lady Macbeth

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Re: Routes the Irish took to the U.K
« Reply #3 on: Tuesday 16 November 04 13:46 GMT (UK) »
Hi Jen.  Thanks for this.  I will do a bit more digging.  What is particularly annoying is that there are no records of 'immigrants' from Ireland to UK at this time, Ireland not really being regarded as 'foreign'.
Happy hunting
PS Apart from living v near Glamis Castle, the username was my nickname at University, but I have no blood on my hands, to my knowledge.
Lesley
Gegan, Geoghegan, Gagan, or any variation whatsoever in Ireland (particularly Co Offaly/Kings Co) and Scotland;
Symons and Symon in Angus, Perthshire and Aberdeenshire, Scotland;
McKenna in Ireland and Scotland;
Wilkie in Kincardine and Angus, Scotland

Offline Meical

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Routes the Irish took to the U.K - Northumbria
« Reply #4 on: Friday 28 January 05 17:32 GMT (UK) »
My Muckian ancestors from Co Monaghan settled in Newcastle upon Tyne, where my great grandfather Michael was born in 1851. I believe my gg grandfather Felix McKenna was also from Co Monaghan, and he settled in Gateshead. Other Irish names in my family in Northumbria include Mulroy, Donaghy, McCourt and Sloan, which again could be Ulster names. (Co Monaghan is part of the historic province of Ulster, now in the Republic of Ireland.) Apparently there was a well established route by sea to the west coast of Scotland then by train across to Newcastle.

Offline Welsh Jen

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Re: Routes the Irish took to the U.K
« Reply #5 on: Sunday 30 January 05 20:35 GMT (UK) »
Hi Jen. Thanks for this. I will do a bit more digging. What is particularly annoying is that there are no records of 'immigrants' from Ireland to UK at this time, Ireland not really being regarded as 'foreign'.
Happy hunting
PS Apart from living v near Glamis Castle, the username was my nickname at University, but I have no blood on my hands, to my knowledge.
Lesley

Lesley. Recently viewed these links and thought of you:

http://www.oldnorcol.dundee.ac.uk/departments/social_studies/migration/theme_a/theme_a06.html

http://www.fdca.org.uk/irishguide.htm

Hope it is of some use to you

Offline Lady Macbeth

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Re: Routes the Irish took to the U.K
« Reply #6 on: Monday 31 January 05 09:54 GMT (UK) »
Thanks for this Jen, interesting reading.  I am hoping that when (if) the earlier censuses of Scotland come online on Scotlands' People it will give a clearer picture of my ancestors movements.
Happy hunting.
Lesley
Gegan, Geoghegan, Gagan, or any variation whatsoever in Ireland (particularly Co Offaly/Kings Co) and Scotland;
Symons and Symon in Angus, Perthshire and Aberdeenshire, Scotland;
McKenna in Ireland and Scotland;
Wilkie in Kincardine and Angus, Scotland

Offline nora T

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Re: Routes the Irish took to the U.K
« Reply #7 on: Monday 31 January 05 17:45 GMT (UK) »
Hi Meical, you havent by any chance got a Peter Mulroy in your family , have you, as i have a Peter Mulroy, from Mayo, in mine, born about 1835?  the  earliest record i have of him is the 1871 census , for Tryddyn, Wales, in a place called Coed Talon Wood,age 32,with his wife? and 2 children,  i dont suppose he is one of your Mulroys, but posting this just on the off chance, best regards, nora T.
i am researching the timmis family salop. staffs, and cheshire, also the culverwell family, congleton cheshire,and staffs.also jervis, jarvis, staffs and wales,also reece, staffs and dudley