Author Topic: The Sad Death of 26 Children at Huskar Pit 1838  (Read 54991 times)

Online tomkin

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Re: The Sad Death of 26 Children at Huskar Pit 1838
« Reply #27 on: Thursday 06 December 07 21:46 GMT (UK) »
    The Mines Act that came into being due to this disaster ,was in some
        respects remarkable in itself. It was published in early May 1842,
        went through the House of Commons, then to the House of Lords
        and with some modifications, became law on 10th august 1842.

           This was astonishingly rapid. The Report was also illustrated
      and the use of people trained in the use of the New Shorthand
      ( Pitman) enabled the quick recording of all those interviewed.
         Thus the interviews could be conducted more like a normal conversation
          than a stop-start session while the Scribe recorded it.

           The report was widely reported in the Newspapers of the day and
         probably for the first time, society had to acknowledge the lives and
          conditions of the "Workers". Something that was for the most part,
             out of sight, out of mind.
 
            Although the deaths of the 26 children at Huskar had resulted in the
            creating of the Commissions report, it was something else that so outraged
             Society and the Government that made this Act, Law.

       Tomkin
       

Offline bridgy

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Re: The Sad Death of 26 Children at Huskar Pit 1838
« Reply #28 on: Friday 07 December 07 05:07 GMT (UK) »
Tomkin and Denn
I have 6 grandchildren aged from almost 4 to 12 - 3 boys and 3 girls.  All happy, healthy, rowdy, messy adorable humans who will  have a chance to do whatever they desire, thanks to living in one of the luckiest countries in the world - Australia.
They will never have the fear of being forced to work in the dark and the cold by circumstances of poverty or exploited by money hungry pit owners.  And if, God forbid, they are 'called to their maker', suffer the indignity of having God blamed for something man created.
I know there are children in this world of ours who still have to work in conditions beyond belief.  We say 'what can we do to stop mans inhumanity to man'.  You two have taken steps in the  right direction by bringing this disaster to the notice of many either too young to know or who were living in different parts of the world.
Thank you both and thank you to RC for attracting caring human beings.
May you all have a happy and holy Christmas and a safe and happy new year.
Jan
Rossiter, Waldron (Kildare), Kelly, Cox, Dollar (Co Armagh), Bridges, Bennett, Hodgson (Bedfordshire), Roberts (Liverpool), Peirce, Tutton (Somerset), Goodwin, Tomlinson (Lancashire), Lovell ( Midlothian)
Rossiter, Kelly, Bridges, Roberts, Goodwin (Australia)

Online tomkin

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Re: The Sad Death of 26 Children at Huskar Pit 1838
« Reply #29 on: Friday 07 December 07 14:53 GMT (UK) »

 Thanks Jan,

                    All over the world ,children are being exploited and forced
        to work in conditions that beggar belief.  As someone once said
        " if we do not learn the lessons of history then we are doomed to
            repeat it."

              Tomkin
       


Offline Dancing Master

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Re: The Sad Death of 26 Children at Huskar Pit 1838
« Reply #30 on: Friday 07 December 07 15:50 GMT (UK) »
There were still Pit Brow Lasses working in the coalfields in 1942.


Online tomkin

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Re: The Sad Death of 26 Children at Huskar Pit 1838
« Reply #31 on: Friday 07 December 07 15:59 GMT (UK) »
Quote
There were still Pit Brow Lasses working in the coalfields in 1942.

               Was that on the "Screens"  DM?


       Tomkin

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Re: The Sad Death of 26 Children at Huskar Pit 1838
« Reply #32 on: Friday 07 December 07 16:42 GMT (UK) »
On the Wigan and Lancashire coalfields the women were still working at the pitheads on the screens.  Hard work and out in all weathers.

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Re: The Sad Death of 26 Children at Huskar Pit 1838
« Reply #33 on: Friday 07 December 07 21:14 GMT (UK) »
Quote
   Although the deaths of the 26 children at Huskar had resulted in the
            creating of the Commissions report, it was something else that so outraged
             Society and the Government that made this Act, Law.

       Tomkin

                     What passed this Bill with such rapidity was the emphasis placed
       on the Moral danger that Women and Children were in.  Lord Ashley, who
       demanded this Bill, knew how the mind of Victorian society worked. He concentrated
      to a large extent on the "Moral Degradation" that Women and Children suffered in
       these circumstances.   The report told of Men working totally naked and Females of
       all ages working naked from the waist up. All working in close contact with each other,
       underground.  To add to this outrageous behaviour,  Women and Girls often wore trousers.
                       All this was totally against the Victorian ideal of family life where the Man was
        the bread winner ( and wore the trousers)  and Women stayed at home and looked after
        the family and did womanly "things."

      Tomkin

Offline dennford

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Re: The Sad Death of 26 Children at Huskar Pit 1838
« Reply #34 on: Friday 07 December 07 22:44 GMT (UK) »
There were still Pit Brow Lasses working in the coalfields in 1942.

Was that on the "Screens" DM?
 Tomkin

I think that the "pit brow lasses" were what we used to call pickers.

A picker worked t the point between where the coal came out of the pit and where it was screened for size. They would watch the coal travelling on a conveyor and remove any stone or other foriegn body from th coal. As DM says, it was often heavy work and at most collieries out in all weather.

Quote
Although the deaths of the 26 children at Huskar had resulted in the
 creating of the Commissions report, it was something else that so outraged
 Society and the Government that made this Act, Law.

 Tomkin
What passed this Bill with such rapidity was the emphasis placed
 on the Moral danger that Women and Children were in. Lord Ashley, who
 demanded this Bill, knew how the mind of Victorian society worked. He concentrated
 to a large extent on the "Moral Degradation" that Women and Children suffered in
 these circumstances. The report told of Men working totally naked and Females of
 all ages working naked from the waist up. All working in close contact with each other,
 underground. To add to this outrageous behaviour, Women and Girls often wore trousers.
 All this was totally against the Victorian ideal of family life where the Man was
 the bread winner ( and wore the trousers) and Women stayed at home and looked after
 the family and did womanly "things."

 Tomkin

That would be hillarious if it weren't true. It's hard to believe in present day society that these ideals ever existed. It makes me shake my head.


 Thanks Jan,

 All over the world ,children are being exploited and forced
 to work in conditions that beggar belief. As someone once said
 " if we do not learn the lessons of history then we are doomed to
 repeat it."

 Tomkin
 

Yes Thanks Jan.

Not only is child labour a problem around the world. I/Our family in Oz were recently forcefully reminded of the terrible levels of medical care in some parts of the world.
Three of our nieces contracted dengue fever so we had to send mony to have them treated. Two recovered within ten days but the youngest deteriorated and began to haemorage, we sent more money so that her father could buy some blood. This involved him combing the city, visiting various "blood clinics" to find one that had the correct group, he then had to take it to the hospital for screening and final use - all this would take 12-18hrs. Our niece continued to deteriorate and was deemed to be in need of intensive care. The crunch was that the hospital wanted payment before they would even consider putting her into IC. The family here again had a quick whip around and got enough money for at least a couple of days. I then called the hospital and explained the situation but they still wouldn't move her untill the money was in thier hands.
Luckily after a week more in hospital she was released and is now recovering quite well, but I often think of all those poor people that dont have the luxury of "Rich" relations; how many children (and adults) die, simply because they can't afford treatment.

And this happens in many parts of the world.

Denn
Ford, Baines, Dixon, Platts, Peat, Proctor, Rotherforth, Dakin/Daykin, Sales, Beech, Hall, Parkin, Nightingale. ----- Harthill, Waleswood, Woodhouse-mill, Whitwell

South Yorkshire/Derbyshire/Nottinghamshire

Torremocha, Candog, Ramos, Reyes, Rodrigueus
-------Philippines --- Bohol

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Re: The Sad Death of 26 Children at Huskar Pit 1838
« Reply #35 on: Friday 07 December 07 23:07 GMT (UK) »

   Truly Horrendous, Denn.

      Tomkin