Author Topic: One for Liverpool Annie Part 2  (Read 67719 times)

Offline liverpool annie

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Re: One for Liverpool Annie Part 2
« Reply #27 on: Friday 14 March 08 02:56 GMT (UK) »


Ivan Vasilevitch Turchininoff

The story begins in Russia where Ivan Vasilevitch Turchininoff, the son of a military officer, was born and entered cadet academy at St. Peterburg at age 14. After experiencing combat in the Tsar’s Imperial Army, he and his bride, Nadezhda Lvova, departed for America in 1856 in search of freedom. They anglicized their names to John Basil and Nadine Turchin and settled in Chicago. Turchin took a job with the Illinois Central Railroad.

TURCHIN, John Basil, or Ivan Vasilevitch Turchininoff, soldier, born in the province of Don, Russia, 30 January, 1822. He entered the artillery-school at St. Petersburg in 1836, was graduated in 1841, and entered the horse-artillery service as an ensign, he participated in the Hungarian campaign, in 1849 entered the military academy for officers of the general staff, was graduated in 1852, and was assigned to the staff of the Imperial guards. During the Crimean war he was promoted till he reached the grade of colonel, was senior staff-officer of the active corps, and prepared the plan that was adopted for the defence of the coast of Finland. He came to the United States in 1856, and was employed in the engineer department of the Illinois Central railroad company until 19 June, 1861, when he was appointed colonel of the 19th Illinois volunteers. He served with his regiment in Missouri, Kentucky, and Alabama, where he took an active part in the capture of Huntsville and Decatur. He was promoted to be a brigadier-general of volunteers, 17 July, 1862, served in the cavalry of the Army of the Cumberland, and resigned, 10 October, 1864. After the close of the war he was a solicitor of patents in Chicago till 1870, for the next three years was employed as a civil engineer, and in 1873 he established the Polish colony of Radone, in Washington county, Illinois, where he now (1889) resides on a farm. He is an occasional contributor of scientific and military articles to periodicals. In January, 1865, he wrote "Military Rambles," a series of criticisms, issued monthly at Chicago, and he has also published " The Campaign and Battle of Chickamauga" (Chicago, 1888).

Edited Appletons Encyclopedia, Copyright © 2001 VirtualologyTM

The Mad Cossack

Brigadier General John B. Turchin (Ivan Vasilevitch Turchininoff) was a nonpareil... No general in either army inspired greater loyalty or more intense hatred than Turchin... In 1863, most Southerners wished him dead, preferably at the end of a rope. "I cannot close this message without again adverting to the savage ferocity which still marks the conduct of the enemy in the prosecution of the war," Jefferson Davis told the Confederate Congress in his annual message to the legislature. "their commanders, Butler, McNeil, and Turchin, whose terrible barbarities have made their names widely notorious and everywhere execrable, are still honored and cherished by the authorities at Washington." ....

Turchin caused quite a stir among his brother officers. he spoke openly of his disdain for army regulations that protected the property of Southern noncombatants, or what Turchin called the "guarding potato patches policy" of "gently fighting the rebels in the field, and at the same time preserving their property from the uses of the army." His convictions got the better of him and in may 1862 he permitted his brigade to plunder the town of Athens, Alabama, which ironically was known for its large loyal population. Turchin was swiftly brought up on charges of "neglect of duty, to the prejudice of good order and military discipline" and "disobedience of orders" by his commander, Major General Don Carlos Buell, who had grown tired of the querulous Russian...The court, of which James A Garfield was president and John Beatty was a member, found him guilty on all counts, and Turchin was dismissed from the service.

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Offline liverpool annie

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Re: One for Liverpool Annie Part 2
« Reply #28 on: Friday 14 March 08 02:57 GMT (UK) »
continued .....


There his military career might have ended, had it not been for the intervention of no less a man than Abraham Lincoln. Powerful foreign- born and radical members of the Republican party, who much admired Turchins fiery abolitionism and no-nonsense treatment of the rebels, cried for his reinstatement. Lincoln not only obliged them but promoted Turchin to brigadier general. In March 1863, Turchin was ordered to report to the Army of the Cumberland. Although his reputation as the "Mad Cossack" preceded Turchin, Rosecrans took a liking to him, and he assigned Turchin to the command of a cavalry division.

General Stanley, however, had only contempt for the "dumpy, fat, short-legged Russian, who could not ride a horse." When Turchin failed to come to his support during a skirmish near Shelbyville, Tennessee, Stanley went to Rosecrans to demand he be relieved. Rosecrans hesitated. Fine said Stanley, "If he stays then relieve me." The irascible cavalry chief prevailed, and Turchin was demoted to the command of a brigade of infantry in Reynolds's division.

This Terrible Sound The Battle of Chickamauga - Peter Cozzens - pgs 176-177

Rape Of Athens "I See Nothing" May 2, 1862

http://civilwar.bluegrass.net/battles-campaigns/1862/620502.html

Such a nasty man apparently had had a such nice wife! She, Nadine, accompanied him in the field, despite regulations. His fellow generals resented her while his men loved her.

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http://tcc230.tripod.com/lacavhistory/index.html

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In the autumn of 1898 at the age of 76 - Tuchaninov now destitute - applied for a pension as a veteran of the Civil War .... his request was denied !
Eventually after two state senators who had served as privates in 19th Illinois Regiment interceeded on his behalf Tuchaninov was granted a $50 annual pension .... the old General had but 6 months to live .... he died in a state asylum for the mentall ill in the town of Anna and was interred in the militery cemetery at Mound City Illinois

When 3 years later his wife died - the War Dept taking into account her services in the Civil War authorised her burial next to her husband  - the single tombstone that stands on their grave bears the legend

"John B Turchin Brigadier General US Volunteers December 24th 1901 - Nadine his wife November 26th 1826-July 17th 1904 "

http://www.rootschat.com/links/02z8/

Turchin, John B, d. 06/18/1901, Plot: F 0 5008B, bur. 06/18/1901
Turchin, Nadine A, d. 07/17/1904, Plot: F 0 5008C, bur. 07/17/1904
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Offline liverpool annie

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Re: One for Liverpool Annie Part 2
« Reply #29 on: Friday 14 March 08 04:09 GMT (UK) »


I forgot to add this .....



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Offline liverpool annie

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Re: One for Liverpool Annie Part 2
« Reply #30 on: Friday 14 March 08 21:06 GMT (UK) »


 I have found it so hard to find Russian accounts of the battle - but I was delighted to find this !!  ;D

Memoirs of a Former Artilleryman

(This is a translation of a memoir by an unknown officer of the Don Cossack artillery. These memoirs are remarkable for containing eyewitness accounts of the Alma, Balaklava, and Inkerman.  The translator says ..... "the anonymous author makes some obvious errors regarding certain aspects of the English and French forces, but I have left these stand since they demonstrate what kind of rumors and misconceptions were current in the theater of war. This source is not referred to by Seaton or Curtiss, or indeed any other English-language historian, and I suspect by no Russian historians either. As an addition to the literature available on the Charge of the Light Brigade, it should be especially valuable. Dates have been converted to the Western calendar ")


The artillery battle ended with the taking of Redoubt No. 3, and Don Heavy No. 3 Battery withdrew to Redoubt No. 1 to deploy with an extended front across the Balaklava Valley. On its right it had the Fedyukhin Heights on which were deployed General Zhabokritskii’s infantry, while on the left, in the redoubts, was the infantry of General Liprandi. In the battery’s rear were the two hussar regiments: in echelon behind (26), on the right flank – the Leuchtenberg, and on the left – the Weimar in columns by squadron (27). Ural Cossack No. 1 Regiment stood at the foot of the Fedyukhin Heights, with a sotnia of Aleksandrin’s Regiment to its left, under the command of Voiskovoi Starshina (28) Kon’kov. To the right of the Don battery was deployed Colonel Brombeus’s Horse-Artillery No. 12 Battery.

In order to counter our success in occupying the three redoubts, the enemy prepared a cavalry attack on our forces. For this he sent forward a regiment of French dragoons and Queen Victoria’s Guards Cuirassier Regiment, under the command of Lord Cardigan. Upon noticing the movement of the enemy cavalry, General Liprandi sent his adjutant to tell our battery to prepare to receive a cavalry attack. In fact, as soon as the adjutant galloped off, the English cavalry passed by the redoubts at a trot in orderly formation and then at a gallop fell onto the right flank of Don Heavy No. 3 Battery, which opened up with rapid canister shell fire (29). The cavalry closed up its torn-open files and pressed forward, as brave as a whirlwind, with all the officers in front. The battery started canister fire (30), managing to fire some 32 rounds, which tore out whole files from the regiment, so that barely a third of the Englishmen reached the battery. * Lord Cardigan on a white horse was far ahead of the regiment, and he galloped up to the battery and brandished his saber at the guns… Although the First Division limbered up in time, Sotnik Rebinin used the command, "Pull back" (31) instead of "Limbers back" (32), and the gun trails plowed into the ground and the tired horses halted (33).** Surrounded by the English, the division defended itself as best it could. All the crew members with ramrods worked them with a will, defending themselves and the guns. In this hand-to-hand fight the first ramrod number, Cossack Studenikin, especially distinguished himself. Of great physical strength, he struck the English with terrible blows of his ramrod, felling eight men and saving Sotnik Rebinin when several cavalrymen rushed at him, wounding him twice in the neck and stabbing him once in the right side with a broadsword. The rear driver of the first gun, Cossack Nikulin of the Veshenskaya Settlement, had his throat run through by an Englishman’s lance; he lost his voice, but is still alive today.

*  It was Captain Oldham who was on the white horse !! 
**  What had happened was that Rebinin had given the technical command to pull back using ropes connected from the gun to the limber without first hooking the trail onto the limber, which would have been done had the "Limbers back" command been given.
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Offline liverpool annie

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Re: One for Liverpool Annie Part 2
« Reply #31 on: Friday 14 March 08 21:09 GMT (UK) »

continued

In the meantime, the Second Division successfully limbered up on the command  "Limbers back!", and rode off in time, except for the fifth gun, whose horses got tangled in their harness. I was with the gun, and after the horses were freed and the guns hooked onto the limber, I took hold of the lead horse’s traces and shouted, "Go!" The gun drew away at a full trot, but after withdrawing about 100 yards, it was surrounded by enemy cuirassiers. One of them even swung his long straight sword over my head, but Cossack Popov covered me with his shashka sword, and Cossack Sherstyugin, a ramrod number, wounded my attacker in the arm with a pistol shot. I picked up the wounded man’s sword and struck his horse’s nose so hard that it reared up and threw its rider onto the ground, where the cossack ran him through. At this time, on Sotnik Ponomarev’s command, the horse tenders led the horses to the guns, the crew numbers quickly jumped onto them, and along with the Second Division’s remaining crew that had galloped up, they threw themselves to the rescue of the First Division, shashkas in hand and commanded by Ponomarev and myself. Now a desperate hand-to-hand fight ensued. Under the command of Voiskovoi Starshina Porfirii Kon’kov, the sotnia from Colonel Aleksandrin’s Regiment hurried to aid the artillerymen, and from this moment there began a general slaughter of the English, who would lose consciousness and be dragged along the ground and perish. Lord Cardigan, seeing the destruction of the cavalry he was leading, turned back and was quickly carried toward the redoubts by his thoroughbred steed, but he was not destined to reach them. His horse was hit by crossfire from the infantry and fell down while galloping at full speed, killing the earl. The next day his body was turned over to the allies and buried with great honor.
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Offline liverpool annie

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Re: One for Liverpool Annie Part 2
« Reply #32 on: Friday 14 March 08 22:55 GMT (UK) »


Here's a bit of trivia !! ..........  :)

When Lord Cardigan dashed into the battery he had by a miracle - passed through the gap between the two guns unhurt and in a few seconds was clear - the first man into the battery and the first man out. Behind him under the pall of smoke -  in murk and gloom -  a savage combat was taking place ......  but Lord Cardigan neither turned back nor paused. In his opinion he said later -  it was "no part of a general's duty to fight the enemy among private soldiers" -  he galloped on until suddenly he was clear of the smoke -  and before him - less than one hundred yards away he saw halted a great mass of Russian cavalry.

His charger was wild with excitement and before he could be checked Lord Cardigan had been carried to within twenty yards of the Russians. For a moment they stared at each other - the Russians utterly astonished by the sudden apparition of this solitary horseman .....  gorgeous and glittering with gold. By an amazing coincidence -  one of the officers Prince Radzivil -recognised Lord Cardigan - they had met in London at dinners and balls  - and the Prince detached a troop of Cossacks with instructions to capture him alive .......  to this coincidence Lord Cardigan probably owed his life.

The Cossacks approached him but did not attempt to cut him down -  and after a short encounter in which he received a slight wound on the thigh -  he evaded them by wheeling his horse galloped back through the guns again - and came out almost where only a few minutes earlier he had dashed in.

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Offline liverpool annie

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Re: One for Liverpool Annie Part 2
« Reply #33 on: Saturday 15 March 08 01:26 GMT (UK) »




Alexis Benoît Soyer was born on 4 February 1810 at Meaux-en-Brie on the Marne in France. He was the youngest son of Emery Roch Alexis Soyer, a grocer, and his wife Marie Chamberlan. The couple had five sons: Alexis was the youngest. However two of the sons - Paul and Rene - died. When Alexis was born, Marie thought he was a blessing, therefore she wanted him to enter the Church. However, he did not choose that calling in life.

Between 1821 and 1826 he served as apprentice to a cook at Grignon, near Versailles and then was employed by the Boulevard des Italiens, where he worked for about three years, soon becoming chief cook over twelve men. In June 1830 he was second cook to Prince Polignac at the French Foreign Office, but left France during the July revolution (1830) and in 1831 he accepted employment in the London kitchen of the Duke of Cambridge. Subsequently he worked for the Duke of Sutherland, the Marquis of Waterford, William Lloyd of Aston Hall, Oswestry, and the Marquis of Ailsa at Isleworth. In 1837 he was appointed as chef to the Reform Club, London. On the day of Queen Victoria's coronation (28 June 1838) he prepared a breakfast for two thousand guests at the club.

In February 1847 Soyer wrote letters to the public press about the famine in Ireland, and in April he was appointed by the government to go to Dublin where he built and opened kitchens from where he sold soup and meat at half the usual cost. While there, he published a sixpenny book, Soyer's Charitable Cookery, giving part of the proceeds to various charities.

In 1849 he began to market his 'magic stove' with which food could be cooked on the table. It proved to be very successful. In May 1850 he resigned from his post as chef at the Reform Club, where his salary and fees brought him in almost £1,000 a year. In May 1851 he opened Gore House, Kensington, as a restaurant, hoping that the Great Exhibition in Hyde Park would bring him numerous customers. Although the restaurant was well patronised, the venture resulted in a loss of £7,000

On 2 February 1855 he wrote to The Times offering to go to the Crimea at his own expense to advise on the cooking for the army there. He began by revising the diet sheets for the hospitals at Scutari and Constantinople. In two visits to Balaklava he, Florence Nightingale and the medical staff reorganised the provisioning of the hospitals; he also began to cook for the fourth division of the army. On 3 May 1857 he returned to London, and on 18 March 1858 he lectured at the United Service Institution on cooking for the army and navy. He also built a model kitchen at the Wellington Barracks, London.

He died on 5 August 1858 at St. John's Wood, London and was buried on 11 August in Kensal Green cemetery

http://www.victorianweb.org/history/crimea/soyer.html

http://www.soyer.co.uk/
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Offline liverpool annie

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Re: One for Liverpool Annie Part 2
« Reply #34 on: Saturday 15 March 08 01:41 GMT (UK) »


Thought Kenhar would like this one !!  ;D

Timothy Gowing was born on 5 April 1834 at Halesworth in Suffolk where his father was a Baptist minister. In 1839 the family moved to Norwich where Gowing grew up and was educated. John Gowing was the minister of Pitt Street Baptist Church in the city for twenty-four years; and continued to live in the city after retiring. Gowing was fascinated by "things military" and was gripped by the excitement generated by the events of the Russo-Turkish War of 1853-4. He was approaching his twentieth birthday, 'a dangerous age to many unsettled in mind', as Gowing said.
Early in January 1854 he enlisted as a Private in the Royal Fusiliers. His training began in Manchester and continued in Winchester; in June 1854 he went to the Crimea. He survived the campaign although he was wounded on several occasions: he even managed to survive a stay in the military hospital in Malta. At the end of the Crimean War, Gowing was sent to India where the Mutiny had broken out in 1857. His descriptions of events there reflect British attitudes of the time.

Gowing had been promoted to Sergeant during the Crimean War; in 1858 he became the Regimental drill-sergeant; he also married for the first time: the couple had twelve children. From drill-sergeant, he was promoted to Colour-Sergeant and in July 1859 he was appointed as acting Sergeant-Major. He was offered the opportunity of a commission in one of the Sepoy regiments but declined the offer, preferring to remain with the Royal Fusiliers. In 1862 he was offered a commission in the Royal Fusiliers but once more he declined, this time on financial grounds. He did not think that he would be able to support his growing family (of five children in four years of marriage) on an officer's pay.

In 1864, having completed a ten-year enlistment, he re-enlisted for a further term, to give himself a full twenty-one years' service and thus qualify for a pension. He remained in India during this time. His family was all but wiped out by cholera in 1869: only one child of the eight survived. The other seven died on the same day. His wife also died in India and when Gowing returned to England in 1876, at the age of 42, he took only two of the children born to him in India.

Gowing went to live in Southport and re-married, fathering another seven children; his second wife died in 1890. His third wife, Elizabeth, survived her husband. Between returning to England and his death, Gowing lived in a number of different towns in Lancashire and Yorkshire. He had his account of the Crimean War and his service in India during the Mutiny published privately and sold them to office and factory workers in Lancashire: other than his army pension of 2/6d a day, this was his only income. Timothy Gowing died on 3 February 1908 at the age of 74

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http://www.historyhome.co.uk/forpol/crimea/gowing/gowing2.htm
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Offline liverpool annie

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Re: One for Liverpool Annie Part 2
« Reply #35 on: Saturday 15 March 08 01:45 GMT (UK) »


Did I do this one already ??  :-\

John Doyle, (abt. 1828 - August 1892) was an Irishman who served in the Eighth King's Royal Irish Hussars (a light cavalry unit) as a Private soldier during the Crimean War and the Indian Rebellion of 1857. Doyle was born at Birr, Ireland, about 1828 and died at Liverpool, England in August, 1892. Doyle enlisted in the British Cavalry at Newbridge, Ireland in 1850. His brother, Patrick, had signed up as an infantryman and died when his transport, HMS Birkenhead struck a reef off Cape Agulhas, S.A.

He rode in the Charge of the Light Brigade at Balaklava. Survived lightly wounded, uncaptured.
Fought at four major Crimean War battles: Alma, Balaklava, Inkerman, and Sebastopol.
Member of the Balaclava Commemoration Society.
Published a memoir of his service titled "A Descriptive Account of the Famous Charge of the Light Brigade at Balaclava" in Manchester, 1877
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