Author Topic: Was a 'Hawker' a 'traveller'?  (Read 13305 times)

Offline marihelen

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Re: Was a 'Hawker' a 'traveller'?
« Reply #9 on: Friday 04 April 08 10:59 BST (UK) »
My grandmother had hawker as her occupation on her marriage certificate in 1910.   I believe the family used to make several things including feather dusters, which were put on a small cart or barrow and sold going around the streets.    I think that was how she met my grandfather.
In the 1901 census she is said to have been a paper bag maker.   Different.     Her father was a labourer at the docks.
On the other side of my family we have stable boys, grooms,
domestics and a shepherd.   Marihelen
Grace (Buckinghamshire and Surrey), Faunge (Waterford, Ireland),  Meilleur, Weller, Smith, Perrott, Turner (Southwark, London), Pearson, Lambert (Lincolnshire)

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Offline An65

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Re: Was a 'Hawker' a 'traveller'?
« Reply #10 on: Friday 04 April 08 14:11 BST (UK) »
Thank you for your replies, I shall keep researching, it would be lovely to think I had traveller/romany genes somewhere, it would help me deal with the increasing need to go and dig the garden (far too many Ag Labs......)


 ;D

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Offline Viktoria

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Re: Was a 'Hawker' a 'traveller'?
« Reply #11 on: Tuesday 21 August 18 21:46 BST (UK) »
In Manchester ,on Piccadilly and Corporation Street there were small flat carts selling various things, greengrocery, flowers . They had their carts in the gutters and sold to passers by.
They were known as barrow boys but also hawkers although it sounds from earlier posts that was not the correct description of them.
Others had trays ,and sold haberdashery, toys razor blades etc but they were mostly on Oldham St.
Again hawkers as they did not have barrows..
To hawk means to carry goods about to sell,but the other meaning is to have a beast of burden
to enable someone to move about to sell their wares.
This means two controversial descriptions  :P
Viktoria

Offline espanol

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Re: Was a 'Hawker' a 'traveller'?
« Reply #12 on: Sunday 30 December 18 21:43 GMT (UK) »
The surname was Knibbs, and his address on the marriage certificate was the 'Greyhound Inn'.

It has made such a delightful change from seeing the ever present 'Ag Lab'!

Liz
I would say that it made gypsies business legitimate. They had to have a licence or woukd be summonsed