Author Topic: The Limericks of Derry  (Read 15437 times)

Offline net64

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Re: The Limericks of Derry
« Reply #18 on: Friday 07 November 08 16:12 GMT (UK) »
Quote from: aghadowey link=topic=339646.msg2188567#msg2188567 surname.

Where did you get 'Robert Limerick born 1801 Ballykelly' ?
[quote

I cant remember. On  Rootsweb.com I think.I will have a gander later and see if I can figure out how I  got it and let you know.

Kingskerswell,do you have any more info on the Robert in Glengermet?  
Doherty-Inishowen,Donegal/Glasgow,Scotland
Bradley-Inishowen,Donegal
Limerick-Derry/Inishowen,Donegal
Brown  - Inishowen , Donegal
cConway-Inishowen,Donegal
Harvey-Glasgow/Campsie,Scotland
McGill-Glasgow,Scotland
Carroll-Ireland/Glasgow
McGruer-Cullen,Banff/Glasgow

Offline kingskerswell

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Re: The Limericks of Derry
« Reply #19 on: Friday 07 November 08 16:38 GMT (UK) »
Net 64, I am afraid not. I only have a census index but the full census does not give much more information. It only names the head of house, the number of males and females and their religion.

Regards
Stewart, Irwin, Morrison, Haslett, Murrell - Dungiven area Co. Londonderry
Browne, Barrett -Co.Armagh
Neil, Smyth _Co. Antrim

Offline net64

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Re: The Limericks of Derry
« Reply #20 on: Friday 07 November 08 17:25 GMT (UK) »
kingskerwell,thanks anyway.
The next route is to go to the archives in Dublin and try and get it there.
net64
Doherty-Inishowen,Donegal/Glasgow,Scotland
Bradley-Inishowen,Donegal
Limerick-Derry/Inishowen,Donegal
Brown  - Inishowen , Donegal
cConway-Inishowen,Donegal
Harvey-Glasgow/Campsie,Scotland
McGill-Glasgow,Scotland
Carroll-Ireland/Glasgow
McGruer-Cullen,Banff/Glasgow

Offline penmill

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Re: The Limericks of Derry
« Reply #21 on: Thursday 19 November 09 22:32 GMT (UK) »
On Rootsweb I found a Robert Limerick born in 1801 in Ballykelly(Tamlaght Finlagan) .I wonder if this would be Margaret's father?

You may already have found this by now. Researching my own family history which can be traced back to Rev. Paul LIMRICK (my great x4 grandfather) born in Derry city in 1693 I have listed many Limericks who must have been related. I think you may eliminate Robert LIMERICK, b. 1801 as he emigrated to the US where he married Rebecca TREMBLEY in 1821 and, if he had a daughter Margaret before emigrating, it is unlikely she would have remained in Ireland to later emigrate to Scotland. Several Limericks did cross the water to work in the mines around Hamilton and the NE of England around North Shields.

However any links between my Paul Limrick (I believe his father was an innkeeper in Derry) and other Limrick/Limericks would be appreciated.

Penmill
Limrick, Limerick, Hallihane


Offline pkincaid

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Re: The Limericks of Derry
« Reply #22 on: Thursday 19 November 09 23:20 GMT (UK) »
The Limericks of Ballykelly are of interest to me.  The George Limerick referred to above was married to a Kincaid.  I suspected a Kincaid-Limerick marriage somewhere and found the source in a US biography (see below with Limerick - Kincaid reference bolded).  The Doherty-Limerick connection is quite interesting as the are a number of Kincaid-Doherty connections as well.


*****
James Clayton joined Captain Lowe's Company, Twenty-third Regiment of Tennessee Volunteers, October 5, 1861, at Murfreesboro, Tennessee, was appointed quartermaster sergeant at once, was put on duty as acting quartermaster as soon as General Cleburne's Brigade was formed, and was commissioned captain and quartermaster in 1862.  Early in 1865 he was commissioned major and quatermaster and was put on the staff of General McComb, and with his command surrendered to General Grant at Appomatox Courthouse in 1865.

At the age of thirty-five years Mr. Clayton married Hadassah Cowan.  She was born near Londonderry, County Derry, Ireland, where was also born her father, Robert Cowan, Jr., and where her grandparents, Robert and Leah (Wilson) Cowan, who were of Scotch lineage, spent all their lives.  Robert Cowan, Jr., was reared as a farmer and engaged in that pursuit in his native land.  About 1850, accompanied by his wife and nine of their ten children, he embarked on board a sailing vessel for America, and after a tedious voyage of six weeks and four days landed in New Orleans.  From there he came by way of the Mississippi, Ohio and the Cumberland Rivers to Nashville, Tennessee, and thence by onnibus to Shelbyville.  Purchasing a grist mill and a saw mill he operated them for two years, and then bought a farm two miles out from Shelbyville, where his energies were employed in tilling the soil until his death at the age of sixty-seven.  The maiden name of the wife of Mr. Cowan was Hannah LimerickShe was born near Londonderry, County Derry, Ireland, a daughter of George and Annie (Kinkaid) Limerick, and died in Tennessee when sixty-four years of age.  She was a woman of much force of character, and reared her ten children to habits of industry and honesty.  The Kinkaid and Cowan families were Presbyterians and brought their children up in the same religious faith.  Mr. and Mrs. Clayton became the parents of eight children, namely: Emma, James, Margaret, John, Jennie, Robert, George C. and Mary.  The son James married Lida Keeble, and they have three children, James, Horave and Annie.  Margaret is the wife of Henry Luck and has one child, Susan Luck.  John married Rebecca O'Neal.  Mr. and Mrs. Clayton for many yearsm until the recent death of Mr. Clayon, worshipped together as members of the Presbyterian faith [Hale, Will Thomas & Dixon Lanier Merritt.  A History of Tennessee and Tennesseans: The Leaders and Representative Men in Commerce, Industry and Modern Activities.  Chicago: The Lewis Publishing Company, 1913.  page 2078].
*****
Kincaids (Kincade, Kinkaid, Kinkead, etc.) of Counties Londonderry and Tyrone.

Gardiners of Ramelton, County Donegal.

Offline pkincaid

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Re: The Limericks of Derry
« Reply #23 on: Thursday 19 November 09 23:26 GMT (UK) »
I forgot to ask where did your Limerick go to in Glasgow (ie. what district)?

Kincaids (Kincade, Kinkaid, Kinkead, etc.) of Counties Londonderry and Tyrone.

Gardiners of Ramelton, County Donegal.

Offline net64

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Re: The Limericks of Derry
« Reply #24 on: Friday 20 November 09 13:42 GMT (UK) »
I forgot to ask where did your Limerick go to in Glasgow (ie. what district)?


Hi.They moved to the Gorbals area of Glasgow.
I also found out that Sally Limerick was Margaret's sister as she was visiting Glasgow  from Inishowen at the time of the 1861 census.
Margarets son John Docherty(my gr gr granda) moved back to Inishowen and was a blacksmith.
  Annette
Doherty-Inishowen,Donegal/Glasgow,Scotland
Bradley-Inishowen,Donegal
Limerick-Derry/Inishowen,Donegal
Brown  - Inishowen , Donegal
cConway-Inishowen,Donegal
Harvey-Glasgow/Campsie,Scotland
McGill-Glasgow,Scotland
Carroll-Ireland/Glasgow
McGruer-Cullen,Banff/Glasgow

Offline pkincaid

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Re: The Limericks of Derry
« Reply #25 on: Sunday 22 November 09 14:11 GMT (UK) »
In looking at the bio of James Clayton above I noticed that I should have also posted another biography (that of George Limerick Cowan) which adds the Ballykelly connection.  It is as follows.

*****
George Limerick Cowan, of Franklin Tenn., was born twenty miles from Londonderry, at Bally Kelly, County Derry, Ireland], Oct. 15, 1842.  His father, Robert W. Cowan, was born in 1800, in the same place, was a farmer and one of the few who owned land.  His wife was Hannah Limerick, also a native of Ireland.  In 1851 they came to the United States and settled at Shelbyville, Bedford county, Tenn., where he bought a grist-mill, which he conducted in connection with his farm.  In 1858 he sold the mill and devoted his attention to farming exclusively.  He was known as the original secessionist of Bedford county and was very active in the serive.  Both he and his wife lived to be nearly three score and ten years old.  They had ten children, all but one of them still living.  George L. received his education in the common schools, and in July, 1859, he engaged in the wholesale dry goods business at Nashville, in which he was engaged at the breaking out of the war.  He assisted Capt. Montgomery Little to raise a company which was sworn into the Confederate service as an escort company for Gen. N. B. Forrest.  At the end of a year Mr. Cowan was elected orderly sergeant, late was promoted to third lieutenant, then second lieutenant, and as such had command of the company at the time of the final surrender at Gainesville, Ala., May 10, 1865.  He took part in all of the engagements in which Forrest's command had a part until the close.  Returning to Shelbyville, he put in a crop on the home place, and later attended school for six months.  In 1866 he associated himself with a wholesale house in Nashville and remained there for three years, when he organized a company known as Kinkade, Hanley & Co., wholesale druggusts, with which firm he remained until 1877.  He then became a leading spirity in the firm of Cowan & Co., wholesale notions, but disposed of this interests in this house in 1887 and removed to his farm near Franklin.  He was married Jan, 3. 1884, to Miss Hattie McGavock, daughter of Col. and Mrs. John McGavock.  After his marriage he erected a neat cottage on their place, a part of the McGavock farm, and this has since been their home.  Five children have been born to them, three boys and two girls.  Mr. Cowan carried on general farming and stock raising, beng quite an extensive breeder of high class roadsters.  He is one of the trustees of the Confederate Cemetery Company for twelve years; has been secretary of the Bicouac of Confederate soldiers; is a member of Hiram lodge No. 7, Free and Accepted Masons; has held all the chairs in that lodge; was delegate to the Grand Lodge for twenty years; has held every chair in Franklin chapter; is now grand king of the Grand chapter of the state; a member of Orestes lodge No. 10.  Knights of Pythias.  In politics he is a Democrat and has always been chairman of the county executive committee in 1892-93.  Of Scotch-Irish descent, he finds the Presbyterian church his natural home and has been an elder of that church for forty years.  For fifteen years he has been superintendent of the Sunday school.  Mr. Cowan was engaged in the insurance business in Franklin for seven years.  He is an expert accountant and does a great deal of that kind of work.  The family home is one mile south of Franklin, and is a very pretty and attractive place [Allison, John.  Notable men of Tennessee: Personal and genealogical, with portraits.  Atlanta, GA: Southern Historical Association, 1905.  p. 138-139].
*****
Kincaids (Kincade, Kinkaid, Kinkead, etc.) of Counties Londonderry and Tyrone.

Gardiners of Ramelton, County Donegal.

Offline oliver2

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Re: The Limerick family
« Reply #26 on: Thursday 30 December 10 21:57 GMT (UK) »
Your thread mentions Limericks in the North of England. i am descended from a William Limerick who arrived in Houghton Le Spring about 1825. William was born about 1781 and married Catherine MacMain in Ireland. They had a son William in 1824. I have not been able to find where they were in Ireland and was wondering if you had come across them.