Author Topic: Latin ? phrase in 1806 will  (Read 703 times)

Offline marinerclark

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Latin ? phrase in 1806 will
« on: Sunday 22 March 09 04:58 GMT (UK) »
Hello   was wondering if put and plor is Latin      Thanks for any help.  LizR
CLARK Waite Ashley Gravett  Vousden Lilbourn
Daniels Marten Craft Beale Rye Sussex,
Morgan, Pranch, Rees, Thomas Llantrisant, St Fagans, St Lythans Glamorgan
Howell Glamorgan, Pembroke
Davies Glamorgan Merthyr and Llangafelach
Perkin, Beynon  Pembroke
Grey David Thomas Williams Llangyfelach Parish Glamorgan

Offline PrueM

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Re: Latin ? phrase in 1806 will
« Reply #1 on: Sunday 22 March 09 05:21 GMT (UK) »
Hi Liz,

Could be...but without knowing the context it's impossible to know.  They look like abbreviations/contractions of longer words to me.

Can you give us the sentences they appear in?

Prue

Offline nuff

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Re: Latin ? phrase in 1806 will
« Reply #2 on: Sunday 22 March 09 15:15 GMT (UK) »
Assuming they are Latin abbreviations, Prue is right that context will make a lot of difference,

put.  from the verb puto could mean several things, such as ; reputedly (implying an element of doubt); belief; a reckoning of a bill, or settlement of it; to hold an opinion; or judge the worth.

plor - or is it plur. ? which would likely mean; many (plura/es) or most (plurimus) or perhaps
of great worth (pluris) or greatest worth (plurimi)

Hope this helps.


Offline marinerclark

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Re: Latin ? phrase in 1806 will
« Reply #3 on: Sunday 22 March 09 15:28 GMT (UK) »
Thank you   Here's the context     "after my demise put and plor out of interest in their own names"     names is referring back to the co executors of the will.  The whole section is about trust monies for a widowed daughter and her children. Will written in 1806 and dau died in 1820.
      Would this generate paperwork?  How would I look for this in the A2 archives?  I'm in the US.  I found one listing about the will W1806 B33 Court of Chancery: Six Clerks Office/Pleadings13/63/51  Burton vs. Clark
Bill and ansew    Plaintiff  Lancelot Brown    Defendant Philip Clark and James Gibson    Revived Trinity 1810
Revived Hilary 1812  Feel free to move this if I'm off topic   Thanks   LizR
CLARK Waite Ashley Gravett  Vousden Lilbourn
Daniels Marten Craft Beale Rye Sussex,
Morgan, Pranch, Rees, Thomas Llantrisant, St Fagans, St Lythans Glamorgan
Howell Glamorgan, Pembroke
Davies Glamorgan Merthyr and Llangafelach
Perkin, Beynon  Pembroke
Grey David Thomas Williams Llangyfelach Parish Glamorgan

Offline nuff

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Re: Latin ? phrase in 1806 will
« Reply #4 on: Sunday 22 March 09 15:52 GMT (UK) »
hmm..

that looses me I'm afraid.

ploro means to weep, but that didn't seem to be in context. ( unless he's trying to say "read it and weep" )

I think it might help to have a larger section to get a run up at it.

A2A is now at
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/a2a/advanced-search.aspx?tab=1