Author Topic: BURGOYNE Family of Plymouth (Ancestors of Cleopatra Cecilia Burgoyne, b. 1844)  (Read 35191 times)

Offline Rol

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Re: BURGOYNE Family of Plymouth (Ancestors of Cleopatra Cecilia Burgoyne, b. 1844)
« Reply #27 on: Saturday 27 November 10 06:49 GMT (UK) »

...  I have just added a 'Cleo story' to my family history site which tried to tell the story from Cleopatra's perspective ... and all thoughts/suggestions etc will be welcome.

Congratulations,  Barry.  You have put together an excellent write-up,  which draws together the various strands of what we have discovered to date -- and in a very well balanced way.  It is great to have such a narrative account so readily accessible for reference on your Ennever site.  The accompanying images of documents and source citations are also most useful.

It is kind of you to credit individual RootsChat contributors in the footnotes as you have.  Of course,  it is impractical to name all the many people who have added value to our communal pot of info;  but I think I would like to put in a special word for Michael Dixon,  because he was the one who discovered those very revealing press reports about the court affiliation proceedings,  and unravelled a good deal of info about Cleo's sister "the Empress of Austria" (aka Maria Theresa) and her Bishop marriage -- which in turn produced the census evidence suggesting that John Burgoyne may well have been working at the Curragh barracks complex at the time she was born.

Reading sections of the two threads again,  I am struck by the many gaps that remain about the Burgoyne family's time in Ireland.  It still galls me that that John's Irish will seems to have been lost in the Four Courts fire,  with no surviving solicitor's draft or extracted copy having yet turned up -- nor even a Kentish MI that might tell us more about his final employment as a clerk [of works??] at Woolwich Arsenal.  Given that Maria Theresa was made executrix and lived in London,  there really ought to be a copy of the missing will in some English solicitor's file of client papers.  One day . . .

Turning back to the Enever connection,  I note that your present wording says this about Augustus's activities before he emigrated:
Quote
It is probably true that Augustus Joseph's father, Augustus William Enever, was a relatively successful business man but it was his brother, Frederick Francis (Frank) Enever, who owned or ran the corn merchants.  Augustus William is always recorded as a clerk, commercial traveller and an accountant and lived in London while the corn business was operating in Banbury, Gloucestershire.  The company's headed notepaper suggesting some success as it carries a royal monogram and the legend "As Supplied To The Royal Farms". This falls some way short of the obituary's headline of 'Once Master of British Commerce', a sub-heading of 'Once Controlled Large Industries in England' and its content which reads 'The son of one of England's wealthiest corn merchants, a power in the London corn exchange, owner of a fleet of vessels'.

Well I think that I have now found some "chapter and verse" on more of the Cleveland Plain Dealer's claims -- at least in the sense that it does seem true that before leaving the UK Augustus had ceased to operate as a clerk and/or corn exchange dealer for his uncle's firm at Banbury,  and had indeed struck out in business on his own account with a partner.  Clear evidence of this appears in a notice of dissolution of partnership published in the London Gazette just a few months before he sailed for America,  which tells us that he had been occupying accommodation in the City at the New Corn Exchange in Mark Lane,  and used warehouse space across the Thames at 86-87 Bankside.  His partner -- errant or not -- was one George Imson Goodhart.*  See the London Gazette,  1 July, 1884 (p.3024).  More digging with those specifics could just reveal some additional info.  (As well as the usual genealogical databases,  might just be worth a long shot or two in the Gale 19th c. Newspaper database?)


Rol





*  ADDED:     As background,  albeit rather off-topic,  the LMA database of London Marriages 1754-1921 (available via An***try.com) includes an image from Hampton PR recording his marriage.  This occurred on 26 Jan. 1886 and describes him as 33,  bachelor,  merchant,  the son of Charles Emanuel Goodhart,  Esquire.  The 1891 census has him living with his family at the Limes,  Bromley,  still a corn merchant,  born Beckenham,  Kent:  RG12/631 fo.75r&v, pp.23-24.  The GRO records his death in Q1 1902 aged 49 -- Kingston RD,  vol.2a,  p.300.  He may not have died in great prosperity,  because nothing seems to show up for him in the online index to the probate calendars.  See also the information shown here:  http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/c/o/t/Rosemary-Cotton/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-1022.html
But N.B. that conclusions about his economic standing may well be premature,  because at the time of writing the annual calendars for certain years were (and today remain) missing from Anc***ry.com's probate database.  One of these gaps relates to the years 1899-1903 inclusive -- Words from "But" ADDED 10 Jan. 2011.


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Offline Rol

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Re: BURGOYNE Family of Plymouth (Ancestors of Cleopatra Cecilia Burgoyne, b. 1844)
« Reply #28 on: Saturday 27 November 10 23:23 GMT (UK) »

For curiosity's sake,  here is some supplementary material about the family of Augustus Enever's London business partner.  Googling suggests that the Goodharts had made a fortune refining West Indian sugar in Limehouse (East End of London).  William Rubinstein,  the economic historian who has specialised in using probate information to analyse patterns of wealth in the UK,  refers to the family in an article entitled Jewish top wealth-holders in Britain,1809-1909.  Towards the end he notes that
Quote
In a surprising number of cases it has not been possible to ascertain with certainty whether the person listed was definitely Jewish. In cases of doubt, one or two question marks have been placed before the name, one indicating probability and two considerable doubt. While it is likely that some in this last category were actually not Jewish, they have been noted here for completeness.

In the list appended to the main article he shows
Quote
?
1853/26
Emanuel Goodhart (1772-1853)
Sugar refiner in Limehouse
£100,000

In Note 3 within the main text he states that
Quote
In addition, the following wealth-holders had Jewish fathers or grandfathers, but non-Jewish mothers, and appear not to have had any connection with the Jewish community: ...
Charles Emanuel Goodhart (1818-1903), son [of] Emanuel Goodhart (d.1853)
£179,308

This website states that in 1820 Emanuel Goodhart (there spelt Goodheart) bought a portion of the old Langley estate at Beckenham from its owners the Burrells (who were by then Lords Gwydyr).  It seems that he built a new house there and
Quote
Under Emmanuel Goodheart the Langley properties were well maintained. Several pictures of the mansion and gardens from those times still exist in the local history section of the Bromley Central Library.
One interesting architectural feature of the Mansion is that the Star of David appears on all the cast iron rainwater hoppers. The Langley farmhouse had been demolished to make way for the Mansion but some of the original kitchen gardens were retained in beds around the house; the idea is said to have been that rainwater passing through the hoppers was then blessed on its way to the plants..
On the death of his father in 1853, Charles Emmanuel Goodheart inherited the Langley properties. In 1884 however CE Goodheart decided to sell the mansion and part of Langley Farm to JL Bucknall, a sale which was completed on 13th November 1884.

It seems that Augustus Enever's partner George (son of Charles Emanuel Goodhart) had a brother called Frederick,  who emigrated to the USA -- and there married the heiress of the McCormick farm machinery fortune.  The pair later built themselves a substantial house near Washington DC,  which they christened "Langley Park",  and in the US National Register of Historic Places appears the following account of the Goodhart family (some English portions of which seem to invite further enquiry):
Quote
In 1921, Frederick and Henrietta McCormick-Goodhart came to the Washington area. Frederick Goodhart (1854-1924) was the son of Charles Emanuel Goodhart of Langley Park in Beckenham, Kent, England. Frederick Goodhart had first come to the United States in 1883 regarding a Utah mine in which his father had an interest. Spending some time in Chicago during this trip, he met and became engaged to Henrietta McCormick (1857-1932), niece and daughter, respectively, of Cyrus and Leander McCormick of McCormick Reaper fame. They were married in November 1883 and went to England to live at the groom’s ancestral home, Langley Park. Their two sons, Leander and Frederick Hamilton McCormick-Goodhart, were born in England in 1884 and 1887. Frederick McCormick-Goodhart practiced law in England, then entered politics, running unsuccessfully for a Conservative seat in the House of Commons in 1900 and 1905. ... Their two sons were educated at Eton and Oxford.2 The family spent most of their time in England, with occasional trips to the United States to spend time with Henrietta’s family. In 1899, at the request of Henrietta’s father, Frederick, through a “Royal Licence”, added McCormick to his surname, and the family name officially became McCormick-Goodhart.3 In 1913, the Elizabethan house at Langley Park in Kent was destroyed by fire, and in 1920 Frederick and Henrietta McCormick-Goodhart decided to settle in the United States. ...
[NOTES:]
1  McCormick-Goodhart, Henrietta, Hands Across the Sea, privately printed, 1921; McCormick, Leander J., Family Record and Biography, Chicago, 1896; telephone interview with Leander McCormick-Goodhart, September 2007
2  McCormick-Goodhart, Henrietta, op.cit.
3  McCormick-Goodhart, Henrietta, op.cit., p. 56.
(PDF available via National Park Service website -- Google's html version here -- then enter Charles Emanuel Goodhart into browser's Page Search field)

The privately printed memoirs mentioned in the notes sound interesting,  but it might well prove difficult to locate copies.


Rol


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Offline Rol

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Re: BURGOYNE Family of Plymouth (Ancestors of Cleopatra Cecilia Burgoyne, b. 1844)
« Reply #29 on: Sunday 28 November 10 06:02 GMT (UK) »

The privately printed memoirs mentioned in the notes sound interesting,  but it might well prove difficult to locate copies.

But not as difficult as all that,  I have just discovered:  the entire text of Hands Across the Sea has been uploaded into An***try.com's Stories Memories and Histories section!  I foresee a spot of browsing coming up later today . . .


R




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Offline Rol

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Re: BURGOYNE Family of Plymouth (Ancestors of Cleopatra Cecilia Burgoyne, b. 1844)
« Reply #30 on: Monday 29 November 10 06:30 GMT (UK) »


Well now,  here are some brief extracts selected from the above-mentioned Hands Across the Sea,  by Henrietta McCormick-Goodhart (1921).

pp.36-37 [images 2_36a and (continuation of text) 2_37b]
Quote
The Goodharts are descended from an ancient family of Hesse-Cassel. Emanuel Goodhart, son of John Henry, came to England in 1755 and married Charlotte Imson, whose parents came from Hanover with George I. There are now in the possession of their descendants a large silver inkstand, a table with an engraved silver top, a diamond cluster ring, and other gifts, presented to Miss Imson's mother by George II and Queen Caroline.

Emanuel was one of the founders of the Phoenix Assurance Company and of the Pelican Life Office, both of London, in 1782. His son Emanuel, born in 1772, was Deputy Lieutenant for the County of Kent.

The family seat, Langley Park, near Beckenham, Kent, is an ancient deer park and is mentioned in Domesday Book. The house was originally a fine Elizabethan mansion flanked by two towers facing an avenue of chestnut trees over a mile long. ...

There was formerly another residence on the property, "Langley Farm," and there still exists a smaller house with massive columns, "Langley Lodge," in which my husband was born. ...

Emanuel married the daughter of the Reverend Peter Thomas Burford, and had a number of children, of whom the youngest, Charles Emanuel, my husband's father, inherited the property.

Charles was educated at Harrow and Oxford ... He married in 1846 Elizabeth, the eldest daughter of Captain Jacob Settle, R. N., whose ancestors for over four hundred years lived at Northcote near Settle in the West Riding of Yorkshire. The old house is still standing with the coat-of-arms of the family and the original date upon it. Elizabeth's mother, Maria Catarina di Stella, was the daughter of a Genoese nobleman, whose parents fled for their lives in an English frigate to Gibraltar from Genoa to escape from the insurrection which took place there in 1796. Elizabeth's eldest brother, an officer in the army, together with his wife and several children, were massacred and thrown down the well at Cawnpore during the Indian Mutiny in 1857.

p.38 [image 2_38a]
Quote
Charles and Elizabeth had five sons and four daughters, of whom my husband, Frederick, was the fourth son.

p.40 [image 2_40a]
Quote
Frederick Emanuel Goodhart was born at Langley Park, January 5, 1854.

As readers will probably have concluded for themselves by now,  even if only a portion of the foregoing information cited from Hands Across the Sea is accurate (and it is true that the author's credibility is hardly boosted by her delicate omission of all mention of the sugar-refining trade),  the surmise made by William Rubinstein about the ethnic origin of the Goodhart family does look pretty dubious: c.f. my Reply 28 above.  It remains possible that they were Christian converts and had baptised their children to secure legal emancipation and wider economic opportunities;  but if that were so,  their hypothesised conversion would probably have antedated their arrival in the UK.  Certificates attached to a deed scheduled by Essex RO record the baptism at St Anne's,  Limehouse,  Middlesex,  of the Emanuel Goodhart who was born in 1772 (bapt. 3* May that year) and of his elder brother Jacob (bapt. 18 Nov. 1770) -- both being entered in the register as sons of Emanuel Goodhart, "sugar baker or refiner",  by Charlotte his wife. (See D/DB T208/57,  a deed of 1831 concerning a trust interest in some property that was once vested in "Jacob Goodhart of Great Ilford Esq." -- by then described as "deceased".)

My short investigations have turned up little to substantiate Rubinstein's theory.  Others may be able to find more decisive information than I have -- if so,  they may like to know that there is a wealth of references to the family to be found in the excellent Sugar Refiners and Sugar Bakers Database,  including a mention of Emanuel Goodhart snr.'s denization and naturalisation papers of 1784 (yes,  he did indeed come from Hesse-Cassel -- from Borcken,  in fact).  But this thread is not really the place to pursue the matter much further.  Still,  the occasional diversion down such byways can prove irresistibly tempting!


Rol



 * 3 May 1772,  not 4 May as originally posted -- nor 31 May as proposed in the message immediately below this one.  (Corrected 1 Dec. 2010.)



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Offline JasperMzee

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Re: BURGOYNE Family of Plymouth (Ancestors of Cleopatra Cecilia Burgoyne, b. 1844)
« Reply #31 on: Tuesday 30 November 10 16:28 GMT (UK) »
Chasing up the Goodhart discussion - Emanuel Goodhart was baptised at Saint Anne, Limehouse on 31st May 1772

(Ancestry.com, Provo, UT, USA, London, England, Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1538-1812 (from Church of England Parish Registers, 1538-1812. London Metropolitan Archives and Guildhall Library Manuscripts, London), SAINT ANNE, LIMEHOUSE, Composite register: baptisms Jul 1747 - Sep 1783, burials Oct 1783 - Mar 1786, 1747 Jul-1786 Mar, P93/ANN/002, image 79).

One assumes that this means that they did not pursue the Jewish faith!
UK Goodharts, the Moresby Family, Shetland Spences

Offline Rol

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Re: BURGOYNE Family of Plymouth (Ancestors of Cleopatra Cecilia Burgoyne, b. 1844)
« Reply #32 on: Tuesday 30 November 10 22:04 GMT (UK) »

Hello JasperMzee -- and a warm welcome to the site!

As you will have seen from the end of my preceding post,  I am a bit concerned that I may be in danger of taking this thread uncomfortably far off-topic with the -- fascinating -- story of the Hessian Goodharts (Gothardts/Gothards?) and their sugar "pile".  I think it is generally best not to allow "cuckoos in the nest" to grow too big,  so I have decided to give the Goodharts a home of their own,  here on the London & Middlesex board.  If you follow the link you will see my reply to your post (for which many thanks) over in that new thread.  I look forward to reading your response there.

I invite others drawn to this thread by the Goodhart connection to post their thoughts in the London thread,  unless the subject matter concerned has direct relevance to Cleo's husband's business partner and any mutual dealings.  I shall do likewise.


Rol

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Offline Moatville

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Re: BURGOYNE Family of Plymouth (Ancestors of Cleopatra Cecilia Burgoyne, b. 1844)
« Reply #33 on: Saturday 04 December 10 19:57 GMT (UK) »
I see Cleopatra now has enough information to write a book about her, and theres more - PRONI have just released digital images of nearly 100000 wills and therein lies the will of her first father in law John Power. Boy did he not like Cleopatra. I will paraphrase a section of the will
His son William ( Cleo's husband was to inherit the vast majority of the Power empire 'but subject to the following express conditions that is to say if my said son William Power shall at any time cohabit with his present wife Cleopatra Power otherwise Burgoyne or reside in any house where she may live or reside the payments of The annual produce of said residue and rents of my estate to my son William Power  shall forthwith cease and be discontinued until he shall cease residence of cohabitation with his said wife and also from time to time in future if my said son should cohabit or reside with his wife the said amassed payments shall forthwith cease and be discontinued during the time of such cohabitation it being my express wish and desire that no part of my property whether freehold or chattel shall ever go for the support of the said Cleopatra Power otherwise Burgoyne or any of her family  or any family that she may have with the exception of the eldest little girl Susan Amelia Power and the oldest boy Frederick Joseph Power .....'

The will is dated 30th Dec 1873 - there is no mention of the third son John Cecil Power (baronet in waiting).Cecilia was not popular at all - I wonder, just wonder if she had been unfaithful... why is John Cecil in the will when all other known grandchildren are catered for (not cited here but in other parts of the will)

I invite comments....

Offline Rol

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Re: BURGOYNE Family of Plymouth (Ancestors of Cleopatra Cecilia Burgoyne, b. 1844)
« Reply #34 on: Saturday 04 December 10 20:57 GMT (UK) »

Thanks for that , Moatville.  Excellent to learn that PRONI have now made access available online for those NI wills.  I had seen a paper copy of John Power's will (at the time the Northumberland thread was still on the go),  but had forgotten quite how fierce the wording was.  Good to have the details posted into the thread.

Cecilia was not popular at all - I wonder, just wonder if she had been unfaithful...
I invite comments....

Well,  the press reports found by Michael Dixon do a great deal more than hint at that!  Barry has now put one of them up on his website -- see this hypertext link.

I did wonder,  as you seem to do as well,  whether Power senior excluded John Cecil because he had suspicions about his paternity;  but I am not sure that the evidence yet stacks up to substantiate such a belief.


Rol



P.S. For the record,  in the sentence repeated below am I right in assuming that the word not [i.e. not left anything] was intended to appear between "John  Cecil" and "in the will"?
... why is John Cecil in the will when all other known grandchildren are catered for (not cited here but in other parts of the will)

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Offline Moatville

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Re: BURGOYNE Family of Plymouth (Ancestors of Cleopatra Cecilia Burgoyne, b. 1844)
« Reply #35 on: Sunday 05 December 10 10:37 GMT (UK) »
yes you are quite right - I forgot to insert 'not'