Author Topic: "Heir Hunters" #2  (Read 36498 times)

Offline Girl Guide

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Re: "Heir Hunters" #2
« Reply #135 on: Sunday 17 May 20 12:42 BST (UK) »
One wonders just how much sideways these heir hunter firms go when looking for descendants.  So that means William had an aunt who married.  However if these firms only go so far outwards then any more distant relatives don't count.

I find that a little surprising.  I would have thought that passing an estate to any relative would be preferable to the government getting the value of the estate.

I would have thought John's great aunt would be a reasonably close relative but evidently not.
Ashford: Somerset, London
England: Devon, London, New Zealand
Holdway: Wiltshire
Hooper: Bristol, Somerset
Knowling: Devon, London
Southcott: Devon, China
Strong: Wiltshire
Watson: Cambridgeshire
White: Bristol
Windo - Gloucestershire, Somerset, Wiltshire

Offline goldfinch99

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Re: "Heir Hunters" #2
« Reply #136 on: Sunday 17 May 20 13:02 BST (UK) »
One wonders just how much sideways these heir hunter firms go when looking for descendants.  So that means William had an aunt who married.  However if these firms only go so far outwards then any more distant relatives don't count.

I find that a little surprising.  I would have thought that passing an estate to any relative would be preferable to the government getting the value of the estate.

I would have thought John's great aunt would be a reasonably close relative but evidently not.

William's father had about 7 siblings, not only my 2nd great grandmother.  So it did seem surprising to me that genealogists hadn't found those lines.  It makes more sense if they simply didn't count as heirs.

I suppose the rules have to put a line somewhere, but it is a shame for distant relatives of people like John David who die intestate that the money can't even go to a relative but instead goes to the government.

I hope William Roberts art that is part of the estate will be able to be displayed as 'national treasures' though.

I was surprised when doing family tree research to find a 14 year old who was listed on a census as being an art student...that made me wonder if he became some kind of artist as an adult.  I never expected that he'd turn out to be someone who had write-ups on things like the Tate website as a fairly major British artist! 

Offline Girl Guide

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Re: "Heir Hunters" #2
« Reply #137 on: Sunday 17 May 20 13:20 BST (UK) »
Well I suppose you could try writing to whomever is mentioned on the Bona Vacantia and ask what relatives count for inheritance purposes.

Mention what your relationship is to John David Roberts and see if you get any reponse.  Worth a try at least.

You know what they say, nothing ventured, nothing gained.
Ashford: Somerset, London
England: Devon, London, New Zealand
Holdway: Wiltshire
Hooper: Bristol, Somerset
Knowling: Devon, London
Southcott: Devon, China
Strong: Wiltshire
Watson: Cambridgeshire
White: Bristol
Windo - Gloucestershire, Somerset, Wiltshire


Offline arthurk

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Re: "Heir Hunters" #2
« Reply #138 on: Sunday 17 May 20 13:54 BST (UK) »
In England and Wales, where there's no valid will it's only first cousins and their descendants who are entitled to claim a share of an estate.

The official guidance is at https://www.gov.uk/guidance/make-a-claim-to-a-deceased-persons-estate

After a quick look online, I believe the situation in Northern Ireland is similar, but in Scotland more distant relatives are entitled to claim.
Researching among others:
Bartle, Bilton, Campbell, Craven, Emmott, Harcourt, Hirst, Kellet(t), Kennedy,
Meaburn, Mennile/Meynell, Metcalf(e), Palliser, Robinson, Rutter, Shipley, Stow, Wilkinson

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Offline Craclyn

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Re: "Heir Hunters" #2
« Reply #139 on: Sunday 17 May 20 17:43 BST (UK) »
One wonders just how much sideways these heir hunter firms go when looking for descendants.  So that means William had an aunt who married.  However if these firms only go so far outwards then any more distant relatives don't count.

I find that a little surprising.  I would have thought that passing an estate to any relative would be preferable to the government getting the value of the estate.

I would have thought John's great aunt would be a reasonably close relative but evidently not.

They only cover the people who would be entitled to inherit from the estate of a person who died intestate. That is fairly limited. If nobody fits the criteria then the estate goes to the Treasury.
Crackett, Cracket, Webb, Turner, Henderson, Murray, Carr, Stavers, Thornton, Oliver, Davis, Hall, Anderson, Atknin, Austin, Bainbridge, Beach, Bullman, Charlton, Chator, Corbett, Corsall, Coxon, Davis, Dinnin, Dow, Farside, Fitton, Garden, Geddes, Gowans, Harmsworth, Hedderweek, Heron, Hedley, Hunter, Ironside, Jameson, Johnson, Laidler, Leck, Mason, Miller, Milne, Nesbitt, Newton, Parkinson, Piery, Prudow, Reay, Reed, Read, Reid, Robinson, Ruddiman, Smith, Tait, Thompson, Watson, Wilson, Youn