Author Topic: Link: ANTRIM WORKHOUSES & INSTITUTIONS  (Read 13803 times)

Offline Christopher

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Link: ANTRIM WORKHOUSES & INSTITUTIONS
« on: Saturday 14 June 08 19:15 BST (UK) »
Hampton House, which was a Protestant Female Industrial School at  Balmoral, is listed in the 1880 directory of Belfast and the Province of Ulster. The 1901 Census contains 190 Names of Pupils, Teachers & Visitors at Hampton House which was located at Balmoral Avenue. http://tinyurl.com/5emacl

I may be mistaken but think that part of Hampton House stands in the grounds now occupied by the Public Record Office.

Christopher

Offline Christopher

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ANTRIM WORKHOUSES & INSTITUTIONS
« Reply #1 on: Wednesday 16 July 08 14:46 BST (UK) »
A list of convents in Belfast and the date that they were founded may make it easier to search for further information about those ancestors.
 
1855-1859   St Paul’s Convent of Mercy, Crumlin Road       
1868-1870   St Mary's Dominican Convent, Falls Road
1869           Good Shepherd Convent, Ormeau Road       
1878-2007   Bon Secours Sisters' Convent, 63, Falls Road
1924           The Poor Clare Monastery, Cliftonville Road.
1965           The Little Sisters of the Assumption, 222, Limestone Road
c.1980        Adoration Sisters, 63, Falls Road   

                  Barnardos Homes
1947-52      Manor House, Ballycastle http://tinyurl.com/5lenzy
1950-79      Macedon, Shore Road, Whitehouse http://tinyurl.com/5jrjqz

Offline Christopher

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Crumlin Road, Belast
« Reply #2 on: Saturday 09 August 08 10:19 BST (UK) »
The Crumlin Road Gaol closed its doors for the last time in March 1996. It had been in use since Victorian times. In 1852 it was known as The New Gaol. The 1852 Directory of Belfast and Province of Ulster said that the building "stands in a very elevated and healthy situation, outside the town, on an area of ten acres, designed after the great model prison of Pentonville, London. Hammocks are used in the cells, which are suitably furnished; combs, brushes, towels to each, with Bible and Prayer Books, tools and working materials, and a bell in each in each cell to call the warder if required". Just like the Grand Central Hotel by the sound of things .. all mod cons in Belfast's New Gaol of 1852.

Board of Superintendence: John McNeile, Esq., DL of Parkmount; Robert Thomson, Esq., of Jennymount; Thomas Montgomery, Esq., of Birchill, Antrim; John Clarke, Esq.; Thomas Verner, Esq.; C. R. Dobbs, Esq., of Castle Dobbs, Carrickfergus; Samuel G. Fenton, Esq.; Rev. R. W. Blamd; Charles O'Hara, Esq., of O'Hara-Brook, Ballymoney; James E. Leslie, Esq., of Leslie Hill, Ballymoney; George G. Clarke, Esq., of Steeple, Antrim and John R. Dickey, Esq., of Ballymena.   

Inspector: Rev. R. Oulton; Chaplain: Rev. C. Allen; Presbyterian Chaplain: Rev. Geo. Shaw
Roman Catholic Chaplain: Rev. H. O'Loughlin; Surgeon: Thomas H. Purdon, MD
Apothecary: James Moore, MD and Governor: John Forbes. 

Crulin road Courthouse opened at the Summer Assizes in 1850 and finally closed in June 1998, after nearly 150 years of continuous usage. The site was sold to a private developer in September 2003.

The County Officers in 1852 were ....
High Sheriff: Robert Smyth, Esq.
Clerk of the Crown: Walter Bourne, Esq., 17, Fitzwilliam Square West, Dublin
Clerk of the Peace: George A. Chichester, Esq.
Deputy Clerk of the Peace: William C. Cunningham, Esq., Solicitor, 4, York Street, Belfast
Crown Solicitor: Maxwell Hamilton, Esq., office: 5, Kildare Street, Dublin
Crown Solicitor at Quarter Sessions: Neil John O'Neil, Esq., 9, Lwr. Gloucester St, Dublin
Treasurer: Alexander Miller, Esq., Ballycastle
Secretary to the Grand Jury: John Coates, Esq., Carrickfergus
County Surveyor: Charles Lanyon, Esq., Belfast
Sub-Sheriff: Robert Clark., Esq., office: 6, Castle Chambers
Court House Keeper: Alexander Rules

The Quarter Sessions were held, four times each year, in the Court House. The Assistant Barrister was John Gibson, Esq.

The Magistrates were: W. J. C. Allen of Wellington Place; The Earl of Belfast, DL of Ormeau; The Mayor of Belfast (for the time being); Rev. R. W. Bland of Abbeyville; John Clarke of College Square; William Coates of Glentoran; Andrew Cowan (Co. Down) of Chichester Street; N. Delacherois Crommelin jnr.; John Curell senr.; Samuel G. Fenton of College Square; J. F. Ferguson, DL of Donegall Place; Thomas Ferguson of Greenville; Edmund Grimshaw of Mossley; Robert Grimshaw, DL of Whitehouse; R. B. B. Houston of Orangefield; Sir W. B. Johnson, DL of College Square; James L. McCance of Glenville; William McCance of Suffilk; James McNamara; John McNeile, DL of Parkmount; William Stevenson; James Thompson Tennent; Robert James Tennent, MP., DL of Hercules Place;
Sir J. E. Tennent, MP (Lisburn) of London; Robert Thompson of Donegall Square West; John Thomson of Low Wood; Robert Thomson of Castleton; W. S. Tracy, RM and Thomas Verner, DL of Ormeau.   

Source: 1852 Directory of Belfast and the Province of Ulster

Offline aghadowey

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Re: ANTRIM WORKHOUSES & INSTITUTIONS
« Reply #3 on: Tuesday 24 March 09 12:02 GMT (UK) »
Workhouses- Antrim, Ballycastle, Ballymena, Ballymoney, Belfast, Larne, Lisburn
(left side of page - Workhouse Locations, Irish Poor Law Unions, Antrim) Note: direct links to each workhouse now added 12/11

Away sorting out DNA matches... I may be gone for some time many years!


Offline aghadowey

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Re: ANTRIM WORKHOUSES & INSTITUTIONS
« Reply #4 on: Monday 18 May 09 09:33 BST (UK) »
There were 2 poor houses in Belfast - the old one on Clifton Street (which was run as a charity) and the workhouse on the Lisburn Road (established under the Poor Law and run by the statutory authorities).

The Clifton Street institution was established in the 1700s - the original building still stands - and had it's own cemetery.
http://www.cliftonbelfast.org.uk/home.htm

The Lisburn Road site is now the modern Belfast City Hospital. http://www.belfasttrust.hscni.net/bch_menu.html.

The Clifton Street burial register survives from 1831 and records the following details:-
Date of burial.
Name of deceased.
Profession.
Age.
Address
Grave number
Place of birth.
Cost to open grave.

It is online at http://www.cliftonstreetcemetery.com/

It is arranged chronologically.

Information posted by akanex2 on this thread:
www.rootschat.com/forum/index.php/topic,381528.0.html
Away sorting out DNA matches... I may be gone for some time many years!