Author Topic: Wireless Broadband Hackers  (Read 6752 times)

Offline falcybe

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Re: Wireless Broadband Hackers
« Reply #9 on: Saturday 17 October 09 20:08 BST (UK) »
Hello Sue,
That is a start, now do you know the model number?
I had a quick look on the Netgear website and it said, if you look here:
http://kb.netgear.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/1148/session/L3NpZC9ZaFVNbEZLag==/sno/0

default username is admin and default password is either password or (for older models) 1234.

However this is only useful for getting into the router where you will need to check for router protection, the SSID and Key I talked about earlier.

Have you tried the http addresses I gave you in order to get into the router information?

All the best, falcybe
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Offline Alan b

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Re: Wireless Broadband Hackers
« Reply #10 on: Saturday 17 October 09 20:16 BST (UK) »
Thanks everyone for your replies my wireless is Netgear if that helps.

Kind regards
Su

That is what I have so try and go here:

http://192.168.0.1/start.htm

Login with Admin + password and find the wireless settings on the left hand side. In the Name (SSID) box type what you want to call it, the mode box should be g&b. Then select WPA-PSK and follow the instructions.

If your computer connects to the internet wirelessly then you will need to add this password into the relevant box on your PC, you might need to run a wire from your computer to your router if you lose the connection.
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Offline Nick29

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Re: Wireless Broadband Hackers
« Reply #11 on: Saturday 17 October 09 22:24 BST (UK) »
Are you sure, Nick? (silly question?) Can you point us towards the videos?

I cannot remember the details now but I thought that 128bit WEP was the best security setting, or was it the best without becoming too complicated? That was last August, when I went over to wireless.

I'd rather not, because encouraging WEP hacking is sailing too close to the forum rules, but I think that a quick Google would find all you need to know  :)
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Offline GrahamH

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Re: Wireless Broadband Hackers
« Reply #12 on: Saturday 17 October 09 22:46 BST (UK) »
There are two types of encryption currently in use - WEP and WPA.  WPA is the newer one, which some older routers cannot handle.

WEP can be hacked by the average 14 year old geek in less than 10 minutes.

There's even videos to show them how to do it.

Don't use WEP encryption - you might as well have no security at all.

If your modem/router can't do WPA encryption, you may be able to get a firmware update for it.

If you have an unsecured wireless connection, and someone uses it for illegal purposes, then it's you that will be held responsible.


Are you sure, Nick? (silly question?) Can you point us towards the videos?

I cannot remember the details now but I thought that 128bit WEP was the best security setting, or was it the best without becoming too complicated? That was last August, when I went over to wireless.

I'd rather not, because encouraging WEP hacking is sailing too close to the forum rules, but I think that a quick Google would find all you need to know  :)

Of course, this is all correct but, for the vast majority of us there is little to be concerned about.

Like everything else it all depends on the risk of somebody trying to break in. If the risk where you live is high then of course you need the highest level of security - but if the risk is low then extra security doesn't have to be number one on the to do list.

Graham

Offline Nick29

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Re: Wireless Broadband Hackers
« Reply #13 on: Sunday 18 October 09 10:48 BST (UK) »
There are two types of encryption currently in use - WEP and WPA.  WPA is the newer one, which some older routers cannot handle.

WEP can be hacked by the average 14 year old geek in less than 10 minutes.

There's even videos to show them how to do it.

Don't use WEP encryption - you might as well have no security at all.

If your modem/router can't do WPA encryption, you may be able to get a firmware update for it.

If you have an unsecured wireless connection, and someone uses it for illegal purposes, then it's you that will be held responsible.


Are you sure, Nick? (silly question?) Can you point us towards the videos?

I cannot remember the details now but I thought that 128bit WEP was the best security setting, or was it the best without becoming too complicated? That was last August, when I went over to wireless.

I'd rather not, because encouraging WEP hacking is sailing too close to the forum rules, but I think that a quick Google would find all you need to know  :)

Of course, this is all correct but, for the vast majority of us there is little to be concerned about.

Like everything else it all depends on the risk of somebody trying to break in. If the risk where you live is high then of course you need the highest level of security - but if the risk is low then extra security doesn't have to be number one on the to do list.

Graham

I'm confused - how can you tell what risk there is, unless you live surrounded by a Faraday cage ?  If you have a road outside your house, then someone can stand or park outside with a laptop and log in, wherever you happen to be.  I'm in a very rural area, and I can see 5 other wireless networks.  Wi-fi signals can travel over a mile if there's not too many buildings in the way. 

I live in a fairly low crime area, but I still lock my doors and windows when I go out.  I would be very stupid not to. 


RIP 1949-10th January 2013

Best Wishes,  Nick.

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Offline GrahamH

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Re: Wireless Broadband Hackers
« Reply #14 on: Sunday 18 October 09 11:19 BST (UK) »
I'm confused - how can you tell what risk there is, unless you live surrounded by a Faraday cage ?  If you have a road outside your house, then someone can stand or park outside with a laptop and log in, wherever you happen to be.  I'm in a very rural area, and I can see 5 other wireless networks.  Wi-fi signals can travel over a mile if there's not too many buildings in the way. 

I live in a fairly low crime area, but I still lock my doors and windows when I go out.  I would be very stupid not to. 
We all assess risk every day - just think about crossing a road as an easy example.

I submit that the risk of anyone standing or parking outside a house in most housing estates, purely in order to try to obtain free Internet access via any unprotected WiFi networks that might happen to be there, is rather less than it is in somewhere like a business district or, perhaps, a rural area.

Given the ubiquitous nature of places like McDonald's with free WiFi people are much more likely to park in their car parks if they are desperate for free access.

Yes, take precautions but don't anybody panic about risks which are unlikely to exist in many places.

Graham

Offline falcybe

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Re: Wireless Broadband Hackers
« Reply #15 on: Sunday 18 October 09 15:28 BST (UK) »
Thanks for the pointer, Nick  ;D I found the WEP hacker video next to the WPA one  :o
One site says change your password regularly just in case,
The general message I seemed to get was that a password that is a line of random numbers, letters and symbols is harder to crack than a word or phrase that could be found in a dictionary, and the longer the pw, the better; up to 63 characters under WPA.
Imagine changing that every 30 days!!
I can check my traffic and as long as it stays steady and when the FBI/CIA/MI5, 6 or KGB stop parking outside my front door, pretending to be patients of our local doctor across the road, then I'll be quite happy  ;D
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Offline Gaille

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Re: Wireless Broadband Hackers
« Reply #16 on: Sunday 18 October 09 17:06 BST (UK) »
My sisters just got a new phone, and an iPod Touch (Which is why we need to sort her wireless network for her at home)

Last week she was sat on my sofa playing with her iPod and announced "Ohhhh i'm online on your network" to which I replied she couldnt possibly be because it was password protected & I hadnt given her the access code.

When I checked the network name I recognsed the name.  We named our network after a family member - not living here - as there were alreasy so many sky wireless networks in the area and I could never remember which one was mine, and I knew another freind & neighbour had named hers in a similar way

When I checked I knew right away she had managed to log in on this neighbours network as it was unsecured - but there were also FOUR other unsecured networks in the same area she could have picked from - she only picked this one cos she thought it was ours.

She logged in for an purely innocent reason, but its worring how easy it was for her to use someone elses connection.

We live in on the outskirts of a medium sized town, in a very quiet area that is almost a village.

Gaille
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Offline Nick29

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Re: Wireless Broadband Hackers
« Reply #17 on: Sunday 18 October 09 22:23 BST (UK) »
My sisters just got a new phone, and an iPod Touch (Which is why we need to sort her wireless network for her at home)

Last week she was sat on my sofa playing with her iPod and announced "Ohhhh i'm online on your network" to which I replied she couldnt possibly be because it was password protected & I hadnt given her the access code.

When I checked the network name I recognsed the name.  We named our network after a family member - not living here - as there were alreasy so many sky wireless networks in the area and I could never remember which one was mine, and I knew another freind & neighbour had named hers in a similar way

When I checked I knew right away she had managed to log in on this neighbours network as it was unsecured - but there were also FOUR other unsecured networks in the same area she could have picked from - she only picked this one cos she thought it was ours.

She logged in for an purely innocent reason, but its worring how easy it was for her to use someone elses connection.

We live in on the outskirts of a medium sized town, in a very quiet area that is almost a village.

Gaille

Hey, GrahamH says not to worry, so (unlike most Roots Chatters) you know where to send the solicitors letters when his helpful advice starts costing you money !  ::)

RIP 1949-10th January 2013

Best Wishes,  Nick.

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