Author Topic: 3rd London General Hospital, Wandsworth  (Read 9868 times)

Offline Scarletwoman

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Re: 3rd London General Hospital, Wandsworth
« Reply #9 on: Wednesday 18 November 09 15:41 GMT (UK) »
The hospital was one of twenty-five Territorial Force General Hospitals run under the control of the War Office, and all opened in previously ear-marked public buildings.  No.3 London General was opened at the Royal Patriotic School in Wandsworth, an orphanage for the children of former soldiers, and they were moved out into other accommodation for the duration of the war.  The buildings still survive, though converted to residential and commercial use, and can be seen quite clearly from trains leaving Clapham Junction on the South-Western Trains suburban routes.

In an effort to recruit RAMC orderlies, the Commanding Office, Colonel Bruce Porter took on many men who were members of the Chelsea Arts Club - artists, writers, sculptors - but who were either too old, unfit, or otherwise unsuitable for military service.  So in addition to a male staff, he also acquired a wonderful assortment of talent, and over the course of the war the hospital produced what is certainly the finest hospital magazine - 'The Gazette of the 3rd London General Hospital, Wandsworth.'  It was published monthly from early in the war, and later produced in bound, yearly compilations, still often available in bookshops and online.  They contain a treasure trove of artwork, poetry and prose, serious and humorous, that give both a general flavour of the life and work of a military hospital in wartime, and also a deep insight into the individual aspects of the people and patients who spent time in the hospital during the war.  The editor was Ward Muir, and he later published his 'Observations of an Orderly' which can be easily found online and downloaded.

There are no other wartime hospitals (to my knowledge  ::) ) that have left behind such an amazing wealth of information, and the means to fit so many pieces of the soldiers' story together, even in the absence of surviving service records.

Sue
Scarletfinders - Researching British Military Nurses from 1880, mainly Great War period

Offline forester

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Re: 3rd London General Hospital, Wandsworth
« Reply #10 on: Wednesday 18 November 09 20:26 GMT (UK) »
Graham,

A bit more on the two you found:

George Strong, Pte 7128, 1st Battalion Wiltshire Regiment.
Awarded British War & Victory Medals and 14 Star with Clasp & Roses.
He was a pre-war regular and overseas (France) with the initial draft 14/8/14.

The second one looks interesting.

George Strong, Pte 9191, 1st Battalion Wiltshire Regiment.
Awarded British War & Victory Medals and 14 Star with Clasp & Roses.
He was probably also a pre-war regular but not overseas (France) until 27/10/14.
Discharged to Silver War Badge List C/628

Phil

Sussex: Satcher (Hamsey) and Gatton (East Grinstead)
Leicestershire: Pratt
South Wales: Evans (Neath)
Poland: Gonet, Deren

Forest Row: War Memorial and Camp WW1
Lewisham War Memorials & WW1 Graves

Census information is Crown Copyright  http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline strong

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Re: 3rd London General Hospital, Wandsworth
« Reply #11 on: Thursday 19 November 09 11:27 GMT (UK) »
Thanks Phil for your additional information.
What does "Discharged to Silver War Badge" mean?
I was lucky enough to get his regiment details from the marriage certificate (see below) but do not know if the eye injury was why he was in Wandsworth hospital in May 1917.

I know very little of the Army structure, how does a Lance Corporal fit in with a Private and why were the various medals awarded?

Thanks
Graham

Offline themonsstar

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Re: 3rd London General Hospital, Wandsworth
« Reply #12 on: Thursday 19 November 09 13:06 GMT (UK) »
From the SWB Roll (WO329/3018 Pages 601-918)

9191 Pte G.Strong.
Unit Wilt Regt.
SWB No 199,170
Enlistment date 1/9/1914.
Discharge date 15/5/1917 (Sickness) KR 392 para xvi "No Longer Fit For War Service"
Overseas Yes.

The badge was issue after 26/5/17


Offline scrimnet

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Re: 3rd London General Hospital, Wandsworth
« Reply #13 on: Thursday 19 November 09 14:06 GMT (UK) »
The SWB...
One more charge and then be dumb,
            When the forts of Folly fall,
        May the victors when they come
            Find my body near the wall.

Offline strong

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Re: 3rd London General Hospital, Wandsworth
« Reply #14 on: Thursday 19 November 09 15:05 GMT (UK) »
Do you think that this could be my grandfather and was the loss of an eye his reason for discharge from the army?

His marriage date was 21st May 1917 and this hospital was given as "current address"

Thanks
Graham

Offline forester

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Re: 3rd London General Hospital, Wandsworth
« Reply #15 on: Thursday 19 November 09 21:15 GMT (UK) »
Thanks Roy.
Is his age/age on enlistment on the roll?

Graham,

It's tantalisingly close, but not conclusive. The War Office wasted no time in discharging those that were not likely to be fit for further service. Many men remained in military hospitals long after they were officially discharged.

Each Silver War Badge was individually numbered.

Phil
Sussex: Satcher (Hamsey) and Gatton (East Grinstead)
Leicestershire: Pratt
South Wales: Evans (Neath)
Poland: Gonet, Deren

Forest Row: War Memorial and Camp WW1
Lewisham War Memorials & WW1 Graves

Census information is Crown Copyright  http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk