Author Topic: What is a Calender Worker?  (Read 3121 times)

Offline Censuswizard

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What is a Calender Worker?
« on: Friday 18 March 05 10:11 GMT (UK) »
I keep finding on death certificates for the Dundee area the occupation "Calender Worker".

What did they do?

Thanks

June

Offline ec

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Re: What is a Calender Worker?
« Reply #1 on: Friday 18 March 05 10:50 GMT (UK) »
CALENDERER / CALENDERMAN / CALENDER WORKER - operated a machine which pressed using two large rollers (calender) used to press and finish fabrics or paper

see

http://www.amlwchdata.co.uk/occupations.htm

I suspect the reason you have found so many in the Dundee area is because of the Jute works - Dundee had a very big Jute industry

Offline Censuswizard

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Re: What is a Calender Worker?
« Reply #2 on: Friday 18 March 05 14:26 GMT (UK) »
Thank you that. I had not got a clue!!! It does make sense now that so many were in the Dundee are as you say with the jute mills.

Thanks again
June


Offline JAP

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Re: What is a Calender Worker?
« Reply #3 on: Saturday 19 March 05 11:17 GMT (UK) »
Hello June,

I hope you don't mind my suggesting this but it might help if you run into a similar problem in future.

Trying the expression in a search engine like Google
http://www.google.com.au/
is always worth doing.

If you put the two words in the search engine within inverted commas:
"calender workers"
it will look for that whole phrase.  And will come up with many hits which provide exactly the explanation that you wanted.
If you enter it without the inverted commas it doesn't do nearly as well (for your purpose) but the usage you want is at least mentioned on the first page of hits and is explained on the second page.

Hope this might be some use in future.

Very best regards,

J