Author Topic: STOYLE & LEE Carpenters & Builders US lookup  (Read 17827 times)

Offline 001uk

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Re: STOYLE & LEE Carpenters & Builders US lookup
« Reply #9 on: Friday 03 September 10 07:56 BST (UK) »
I found an example of AZO.  You learn something new everyday.  ;)

Hi Lisa,

AZO is a name for a type of paper photo postcards were printed on mostly in the US. The "stamp box" is the area where the postage stamp was to be affixed (NE corner). The paper name was incorporated in the box (sometimes) together with symbols. It's possible to date the paper from these symbols.

I have checked the symbols and AZO with 4 triangles pointed up is 1904-1918.

More info can be found on this subject on an excellent website for a US postcard auctioneer:
http://www.playle.com/realphoto/index.php

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Offline 001uk

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Re: STOYLE & LEE Carpenters & Builders US lookup
« Reply #10 on: Friday 03 September 10 08:31 BST (UK) »
I think the lookup requests area doesn't allow for photos.  I'll try moving the thread.

Hi Shelley, thanks for your help! Have added the images to my original post.
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Online Erato

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Re: STOYLE & LEE Carpenters & Builders US lookup
« Reply #11 on: Friday 03 September 10 13:03 BST (UK) »
Can you scan it at higher resolution? 

I am mystified by the trees.  They do not look like something from the eastern US to me.  Could they be eucalyptus?
Wiltshire:  Banks, Taylor
Somerset:  Duddridge, Richards, Barnard, Pillinger
Gloucestershire:  Barnard, Marsh, Crossman
Bristol:  Banks, Duddridge, Barnard
Down:  Ennis, McGee
Wicklow:  Chapman, Pepper
Wigtownshire:  Logan, Conning
Wisconsin:  Ennis, Chapman, Logan, Ware
Maine:  Ware, Mitchell, Tarr, Davis


Offline johnnyboy

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Re: STOYLE & LEE Carpenters & Builders US lookup
« Reply #12 on: Friday 03 September 10 17:53 BST (UK) »
There is something written under the word CARD. It looks like "Stoyle W/Z Builder." I think the house is built in a city.

I'm not placing it in Brooklyn, New York, but the width of the house looks about as wide as a building lot in Brooklyn. And it seems to be built on a double lot, which was typical when Brooklyn's neighborhoods nearer to Manhattan (Brooklyn Heights, what's now called Carroll Gardens, Boerum Hill, Fort Green, and Park Slope) still had lots of single-family homes (as opposed to the brownstone row houses that are prevalent there today).

On the far right is a wall covered with ivy; it looks to be three or four stories tall, perhaps brick but may more likely be brownstone. You still see ivy covering the exposed side walls of brownstones at the end of a row in Brooklyn, as well as in other places, I presume.

It's also very common today in Brooklyn to use the word "garden" to describe the small back yard area behind a house. Was that true circa 1910 in the U.K.?

In the U.S., it's standard to call the upper floor of a building with two floors the second story. I've heard that floor called the first floor in the U.K. The writer uses first floor and second floor, and he has adopted the American spelling of "story."

But, if had he been in the U.S. for any length of time, would he have been more likely to use dollars than pounds when speaking of money? Or was he using pounds for the sake of his correspondents?

The names Sally and Tom (I think) are in the text of the post card. Could Sally be the woman in the window. Frank and Timmie (?) are the recipients. Perhaps these latter two are brothers of Ted? Maybe they are together in one of the U.K censuses.

John
:o :o :o
ENGLAND (all Yorkshire but one)
SLATER: Ovenden, Halifax, and Massachusetts
DOBSON, LONGBOTTOM: Thornton (Bradford)
DRURY: Darton, Halifax, and Massachusetts
NEVIL(LE): Wigan (Lancs.), Darton
MEGSON: Dewsbury, Ossett
GARSIDE: Woolley, West Bretton

SCOTLAND
ROBERT HENDRY: b. 1856, Who-knows-where-shire, Scotland; 1882 to US
DEMPSTER, HOUSTON: Lesmahagow, Glasgow, and Massachusetts
GALBRAITH, MEIKLE: Kirkmichael, Ayr.; Hamilton, Glasgow, and Massachusetts

Offline 001uk

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Re: STOYLE & LEE Carpenters & Builders US lookup
« Reply #13 on: Friday 03 September 10 18:02 BST (UK) »
Hello Erato
Many thanks for all you impressive input. I appreciate the time & effort you spent.My money is on Manhattan right now.
Regards~001uk
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Offline 001uk

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Re: STOYLE & LEE Carpenters & Builders US lookup
« Reply #14 on: Friday 03 September 10 18:36 BST (UK) »
Hi John,
Thanks again for replying.

The inscription Stoyle W/Z Builder should be disregarded as this was an unerased pencil comment made recently when it was thought the card was British.

It does appear to be ivy growing very straight upwards: on a building rather than a tree.

"Garden" was certainly used in Britain for a plot of land adjoining a property whether front or back. It is still in use today! I have a hunch the chap (in the photo) was British and ventured to the US. Postcards were often sent within envelopes to keep private...away from the prying eyes of the nosey postman back home perhaps.

The story of floors is interesting. I take on board your American suggestion. In the UK generally, the 1st floor would be upstairs on a two floor build.

I'm sure including Pounds is for the benefit of the recipients. A Briton abroad still has the pound sign in the brain! (Even today most Brits would NOT want anything else)!! However, what is highly unusual is the figure to preceed the £ sign......definitely not British!

The last two lines are interesting. He writes:
"..Sally (?) wrote home to say Tom was manager of...at(?) 10 £ a week, she is the Bloodiest liar".
Alas his writing is not clear and there are many mistakes with the content not flowing. Timmie presumeably would be a shortened version of Timothy, not a terribly common name then. Could it be a child? Could it be a female's name? I'll have a crack at the census for your suggestion of left at home brothers (or a sister)!

Thanks for your terrific interest.
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Offline Lisa in California

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Re: STOYLE & LEE Carpenters & Builders US lookup
« Reply #15 on: Friday 03 September 10 18:45 BST (UK) »
I checked American WWI Reg Cards...after a quick search I did not see a Stoyle or Lee (born in England) with the occupation carpenter.  I may have missed records, though.

I agree with Erato, a couple of the limbs do look like eucalyptus.
Ellison: Co. Wicklow/Canada       Fowley: Sligo/Canada       Furnival: Lancashire/Canada       Ibbotson: Sheffield/Canada       Lee/DeJongh: Lancashire & Cheshire       Mumford: Essex/Canada       Ovens: Ireland/Canada       Sarge: Yorkshire/Canada       Stuart: Sligo/Canada       Sullivan: Co. Clare/Canada      Vaus: Sussex/Surrey      Wakefield: Tuam or Ballinasloe, Ireland       (Surname: Originated/Place Last Lived)  (Canadians lived in Ontario)

Online Erato

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Re: STOYLE & LEE Carpenters & Builders US lookup
« Reply #16 on: Friday 03 September 10 18:54 BST (UK) »
Is there any date to indicate what month the card was sent?  The photo was apparently taken four months earlier, which would give an idea of the season.  The tree in the background seems to be just leafing out or losing its leaves, whereas those in the foreground are fully leafed.

It’s that very tall straight pole-like tree with no branches that confounds me.  It goes straight into the ground with no sign of roots at the surface - like eucalyptus here in Ecuador.  Plus, in my experience, street trees are not pruned like that in the US northeast.   The other two trees in the foreground [left and right] could possibly be elms.  They were common street trees before Dutch elm disease took hold in about the 1940s.
Wiltshire:  Banks, Taylor
Somerset:  Duddridge, Richards, Barnard, Pillinger
Gloucestershire:  Barnard, Marsh, Crossman
Bristol:  Banks, Duddridge, Barnard
Down:  Ennis, McGee
Wicklow:  Chapman, Pepper
Wigtownshire:  Logan, Conning
Wisconsin:  Ennis, Chapman, Logan, Ware
Maine:  Ware, Mitchell, Tarr, Davis

Offline Ambra

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Re: STOYLE & LEE Carpenters & Builders US lookup
« Reply #17 on: Wednesday 22 September 10 16:14 BST (UK) »
This could be a photo of Edward Stoyle, born in 1864 in Scotland, where his father, John Clarke Stoyle, was stationed as a soldier.   Edward followed him into the army for several years:  his army record can be seen on "Findmypast".    He appears in the 1901 census as a carpenter in Bedwelty, Wales.   He married there in 1904 but left his wife and went to the U.S.A., apparently before the 1911 census, when he did not show up in Britain.   He is said to have married again in the U.S.A.   At the end of his life he was ordered ashore to hospital in New York when about to return to Britain and he died in March 1930.

The man in the photo looks tall, and this Edward was over 6 feet in height (and dark-haired), according to his army papers.    The language in the postcard sounds a bit military, too.

Certainly this Edward was the "unmarried" Edward, aged 46, whom Erato found in Manhattan in the 1910 census.