Author Topic: The surname AGAMBER  (Read 10360 times)

Offline richarde1979

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Re: The surname AGAMBER
« Reply #18 on: Saturday 23 October 10 17:42 BST (UK) »
Hi Ashely

I do have a fair idea why.

Basically when the Huguenots fled, the main place of choice was the Dutch Netherlands, twice as many went there as here. Part of this was no doubt it was easier to escape on foot by land, then risk the perilous sea journey to England. My ancestor for example lived in Pay de Caux Normandy, so you would have thought escape to England by boat would have been first option. Instead they treked near 100 miles to the Dutch border, and were arrested trying to cross the river there at the last moment. They were then marched back to Normandy and imprisoned for two years before Louis expelled them..to England!

The main reason though was probably the fact when the revocation came into force Oct 1685, William of Orange was on the throne in the Netherlands, the champion of the Protestant people. Our King was James II, a pretty open Catholic, and the first cousin of the tyrant Louis XIV they were fleeing. (In fact he'd spent his formative years at his Catholic cousins court in Paris, after being forced out in the English civil war, and was more French in habit then English). William of course then ousted James, and with his wife Mary, James's daughter, united the British and Dutch throne in 1688. However for that first few years 1685-88 obviously the majority who could headed for Holland rather than Britian.

Families were frequently split, some going to Holland, some England, as they could not escape together. This is same for my family. Therefore after 1688, until Williams death in 1702, when the two countries were briefly united, they tended to cross back and foward Amsterdam to London freely, and many families were established in both places. To a lesser extent it continued after 1702, though a great many in the Netherlands, made the move permanently to England at that time once William their protector had died, including my own ancestors.
Bellenger, Sebire, Soubien, Mallandain, Molle, Baudoin - Normandy/London
Deverdun, Bachelier, Hannoteau, Martin, Ledoux, Dumoutier, Lespine, Montenont, Picard, Desmarets - Paris & Picardy/Amsterdam/London
Mourgue, Chambon, Chabot - Languedoc/London

Holohan, Donnelly, McGowan/McGoan - Leitrim, Ireland/Dundee, Scotland/London.

Gordon, Troup, Grant, Watt, McInnes - Aberdeenshire, Scotland/London

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Offline JosiahS

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Re: The surname AGAMBER
« Reply #19 on: Saturday 23 October 10 19:40 BST (UK) »
Thanks again for the great explanation Richarde!
DU: Jones, Miller, Laverick, Orwin, Burn, Finlay, Robson, Robinson, Jobling, Fenwick, Spoor, Saunders, Billingsley, Bainbridge, Chilton
NB: Pickard, Gilchrist, Curry, Heron, Thompson, Bell, Henderson, Aynsley, Crumbie
CU: Bell, Armstrong, Parker
SY: Saunders, Bartlett, Ellis
Buckinghamshire: Saunders
N Yorks: Miller (Swaledale), Raw
ALL CENSUS INFORMATION CONTAINED IN POSTINGS IS CROWN COPYRIGHT FROM www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

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Offline Redroger

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Re: The surname AGAMBER
« Reply #20 on: Sunday 24 October 10 15:12 BST (UK) »
Richarde, I have an ancestor by the surname Moule, 3XGGM who lived in the Cambridge area. I believe she was Hugenot by origin, Do you have any further information on theis surname please?
Ayres Brignell Cornwell Harvey Shipp  Stimpson Stubbings (all Cambs) Baumber Baxter Burton Ethards Proctor Stanton (all Lincs) Luffman (all counties)

Offline richarde1979

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Re: The surname AGAMBER
« Reply #21 on: Sunday 24 October 10 15:42 BST (UK) »
Hi Redroger

My Molle's were spelt variously in the rcords as Mole, Molle, Moule, Mollet, so it may be the same name. Mine were originally from Bolbec in Normandy, so it may be the same of the Cambridge branch. I know Huguenots went out that way as they were very involved in the draining of the fens.
Bellenger, Sebire, Soubien, Mallandain, Molle, Baudoin - Normandy/London
Deverdun, Bachelier, Hannoteau, Martin, Ledoux, Dumoutier, Lespine, Montenont, Picard, Desmarets - Paris & Picardy/Amsterdam/London
Mourgue, Chambon, Chabot - Languedoc/London

Holohan, Donnelly, McGowan/McGoan - Leitrim, Ireland/Dundee, Scotland/London.

Gordon, Troup, Grant, Watt, McInnes - Aberdeenshire, Scotland/London

Offline Redroger

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Re: The surname AGAMBER
« Reply #22 on: Sunday 24 October 10 15:54 BST (UK) »
That looks very promising Richarde, Thanks or should I say merci?
Ayres Brignell Cornwell Harvey Shipp  Stimpson Stubbings (all Cambs) Baumber Baxter Burton Ethards Proctor Stanton (all Lincs) Luffman (all counties)

Offline richarde1979

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Re: The surname AGAMBER
« Reply #23 on: Sunday 24 October 10 16:36 BST (UK) »
Either...all greatfully recieved  ;)
Bellenger, Sebire, Soubien, Mallandain, Molle, Baudoin - Normandy/London
Deverdun, Bachelier, Hannoteau, Martin, Ledoux, Dumoutier, Lespine, Montenont, Picard, Desmarets - Paris & Picardy/Amsterdam/London
Mourgue, Chambon, Chabot - Languedoc/London

Holohan, Donnelly, McGowan/McGoan - Leitrim, Ireland/Dundee, Scotland/London.

Gordon, Troup, Grant, Watt, McInnes - Aberdeenshire, Scotland/London

Offline Chrisd1974

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Re: The surname AGAMBER
« Reply #24 on: Tuesday 10 January 12 17:21 GMT (UK) »
I am also related to Temperance and the rest of the gang!

Temperance married James Arrowsmith and had a son William who married Sarah Trenell.

Sarah and William had a son Thomas Arrowsmith, who had a daughter called Ellenor etc etc until my great grandfather and grandfather - by then with the surname Chesterman.

I've traced the Agombar name backwards as follows:

Jaques 1731
Jaques 1706
Pierre 1675 (He's the one who moved to England - I have him as from Amiens)
Jacob 1649 (He's the first of the St Quentin group and the spelling is Hagombart)
Jaques 1624
Jacob 1600 (although I don't trust the date)
Jehan 1564
Jacob 1540
Jehan 1519

And that's where it runs out.

Fascinating stuff. I found out the other day that one of my relatives used to live next door to my local after work pub in Holborn! Small world as they say.

Offline jimmytheone

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Re: The surname AGAMBER
« Reply #25 on: Friday 30 November 18 16:39 GMT (UK) »
Hello,

Lots of helpful stuff here but you must have noticed that there are different versions of the line before Jaques Solamon Hagombart, b.1624 in the responses to this question;
Jacob - Jehan - Jacob - Jehan
and
Nicolas - Jehan - Jehan
Elsewhere I have seen a tree giving Jacob - Jacob
Who is most confident they are right?

Nearer to the present day, everyone seems agreed that Jaques Solamon Hagombart's son Jacob married Marie Brancourt Le Grand but Familysearch has children baptised at around the same time as their son Pierr[e] in St Quentin but with parents Salomon Hagombart and Marie Le Grand, sans the Brancourt . For example, Jacob on March 29, 1671. Were they a different couple or were they like Jewish ancestors I've tried to trace who seem to change their names every year? I suppose I should just plough through the registers on line. Isn't it amazing that we can read 350 year old French records in the comfort of our own homes!

Cheers.