Author Topic: Link: Antrim Town Places  (Read 22550 times)

Offline Christopher

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Lisnagarvey - Links
« Reply #9 on: Wednesday 02 April 08 15:30 BST (UK) »
Lisnagarvey (Irish: Lios na gCearrbhach: meaning fort of the gamblers) has been anglicised to Lisburn but a number of clubs, groups and organisations retain the Irish name. When David Trimble, a former First Minister of Northern Ireland, was elevated to the House of Lords, he took the title Baron Trimble, of Lisnagarvey.

Sports clubs are good places to find an ancestor. Have a look at the names of the guys from Lisnagarvey Hockey Club who fought in WWI  www.lisburn.com/books/Lisnagarvey-HC/garvey-2.htm

The roots of the Lisnagarvey Operatic Sociey go back to 1928 when it was known as the Lisburn Choral and Orchestral Society. Unfortunately the website doesn't mention names but there should be Society records and possibly old programmes. http://members.lycos.co.uk/thompydj

Offline Christopher

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Re: ANTRIM PLACES
« Reply #10 on: Wednesday 16 April 08 21:16 BST (UK) »
Gaelic football has been played in the Glenavy area since 1899. The first club was "Owen Roes." The Club records show that it participated in competitions up until about 1916 - 17. The present club was founded in 1942 when a group of locals including Dan Cardwell, Kevin Cinnamond, Joe Ayre, Bobby Heatley, John and Paddy O'Neill, Felix Mulholland, Donald Jordan, Tom Fleeton, and Joe McGarry enlisted the support of the curate Fr. O'Hare www.glenavygac.com/history.php

You can read "Glenavy: Past and Present" Compiled by Charles Watson, M.A., B.D., T.C.D. Vicar of the Union. 1892 on www.lisburn.com/books/Glenavy_past_present/glenavy_past-2.html

The Down Memory Lane website has a photograph of pupils at the Ballymacricket School, Glenavy in 1922 but unfortunately there are no names www.downmemorylane.me.uk/Antrim%20B18.htm
 

Offline Christopher

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Re: ANTRIM PLACES
« Reply #11 on: Saturday 19 July 08 12:42 BST (UK) »
1910 Portglenone Directory www.libraryireland.com/UlsterDirectory1910/Portglenone.php

1st Portglenone Presbyterian Church - History www.portglenone.co.uk/1stportglenone.htm

History of Portglenone Masonic Lodge http://tinyurl.com/5sbj5e

Our Lady of Bethlehem Abbey www.bethlehem-abbey.org.uk

Portglenone - www.from-ireland.net/ant/lewis/portglenone.htm
Lewis Topographical Dictionary 1837 on Dr Jane Lyons From Ireland website

Portglenone Area www.portglenone-cce.fsnet.co.uk/hist.html

Portglenone Library http://tinyurl.com/5twcfl

Portglenone Parish - This site shows the Church records for this area at PRONI
www.vyger.fsnet.co.uk/Parish_records/Antrim/North_west/Portglenone/portglenone.html

Offline datawise

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Cullybackey: The Story of an Ulster Village
« Reply #12 on: Friday 17 October 08 09:08 BST (UK) »
I've managed to purchase a copy of this book, published in 1913. It contains much relevant information on the history and families of the village. It is searchable via Google Books (http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=igtjFUP_hjEC&lr=), but you can only view snippets of the pages.

Peter
Holloway in Worcestershire and Gloucestershire, 18th & 19th Centuries
Given/Givens 18th C Antrim, Ireland


Offline aghadowey

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Re: ANTRIM PLACES
« Reply #13 on: Tuesday 24 March 09 09:22 GMT (UK) »
Away sorting out DNA matches... I may be gone for some time many years!

Offline aghadowey

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Re: ANTRIM PLACES
« Reply #14 on: Saturday 01 August 09 20:06 BST (UK) »
Doagh
Leaflet "Heritage Walking Trails in Newtownabbey- Doagh" (Ballyclare & District Historical Society) gives directions for 1 1/2-2 hr. walk around Doagh.
Ancient Churchyard (remains of Church of St. Mary which may have been part of th century monastic settlement of Black Friars)
Norman motte (outpost of Carrickfergus Castle)
site of Doagh Railway Station (ran to Ballyclare then Larne)- opened 1884 for goods traffic- walk along track to see red brick stationmaster's house
Fisherwick- hunting lodge built by Marquis of Waterford in late 1700s- hotel and stables built nearby for visitors who came to hunt wth Marquis
John Rowan monument- engineer and inventor born 1787 Doagh, established foundry in village, 1836 designed and built steam coach which he drove to Belfast
Ballyhamage House built by Rev. George Johnston with adjoining church used as a chapel of ease
Methodist Church
William Gault, United Irishman, started book club and one of 1st Sunday schools in Ireland in 1770 (after Battle of Antrim soldiers destroyed many of the school books by playing football wth them)
Torrens Hall- built 1885 as Ladies' School
Doagh Spinning Mill- built 1870s
Kilbride Church of Ireland
Kilbride Presbyterian Church


Mary Florence McDowell, author of Roses & Rainbows and Other Days Around Me, wrote  about her life in Doagh in her books (spent her childhood at Brookfeld House outside Doagh, taught Cogry Mill School)

Ballyclare
Ballyclare & District Historical Society NEW
Away sorting out DNA matches... I may be gone for some time many years!

Offline aghadowey

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Re: ANTRIM PLACES
« Reply #15 on: Tuesday 01 March 11 19:55 GMT (UK) »
GLENAVY

GlenavyHistory.com has lots of information about the area- parishes, townlands, places of worship, schools, war memorials, events, photo gallery, etc.
Away sorting out DNA matches... I may be gone for some time many years!