Author Topic: Hodgson's Mill  (Read 14659 times)

Offline Michael Dixon

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Re: Hodgson's Mill
« Reply #9 on: Tuesday 30 November 10 14:55 GMT (UK) »
 Thank you Philip. All clear now.  Am I right in thinking that the Golden Fleece pub was very close to the mill ?

The Courant also had an interesting account of how the first Presbyterian preaching in the area, took place in Cowpen Square* in 1700s. And how Richard Hodgson gave/lent accommodation in Cowpen Square to the Presbyterians for their base; the first in the Blyth area.


 * Cowpen Square.   Although it is obviously a square of houses within the "township" of Cowpen ( with the notorious "ash pits" in the middle), it seems from articles in newspapers of the day, that the wider area around Cowpen Square, was also referred to as Cowpen Square.


Michael
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Offline Phodgetts

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Re: Hodgson's Mill
« Reply #10 on: Tuesday 30 November 10 16:46 GMT (UK) »
Hi Michael, it is difficult to say how close the Golden Fleece and the Mill might have been in relation to each other. The earliest plan I have is dated 1813 and it is not to scale. I am not even sure that the Golden Fleece and the Mill co-habited for any length of time. The pub was not there on the 1813, 1853, 1860, 1866 or 1872 plans, but it is there on the 1897 map.

When the Mill was finally removed from the site I have no idea, hence my doubts about the two buildings co-habiting on that patch of land. However, if they did, the 1897 map shows that the distance from the Golden Fleece to the sharp corner of Hodgson's Lane / Road was less than 400 feet. On the basis of that I guess-timate that the distance between the two buildings would have been approximately 300 feet. Interestingly the area was known as Crofton Mills by 1860

I hope that clears the mud a bit......... No! Oh well, I will have to look deeper into the info I have to hand.

I wonder what significance (if any) there might have been to the opening of the Golden Fleece and the first vehicular ferry entering service in 1890? A second temptation to the workers leaving North Blyth on the ferry who had managed to get passed the Ridley!

The attached plan is dated 1860.


Philip
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Berkshire; Knight, Bristor, Sharpe, Sharp, Ashley.
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Offline kappm

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Re: Hodgson's Mill
« Reply #11 on: Monday 02 May 11 19:24 BST (UK) »
Thanks for posting your 1853 map showing Cowpen Square, and an aerial photo showing the Square.  One of my ancestor's was brought up there, hence my interest.

Could you tell me when the photo was taken, and who developed the Square itself?  It seems such an unusual development.

I'd be grateful for any info you can provide.


Offline c-side

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Re: Hodgson's Mill
« Reply #12 on: Monday 02 May 11 23:37 BST (UK) »
Hi Kappm

Welcome to rootschat.

Does your ancestor have a name and approximately when did he/she live there?  I too had family in the Square at one point.

Christine

Offline Phodgetts

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Re: Hodgson's Mill
« Reply #13 on: Tuesday 03 May 11 09:34 BST (UK) »
Could you tell me when the photo was taken, and who developed the Square itself?  It seems such an unusual development.


Hi Kappm, firstly the aerial photo was taken after 1934. I am not sure when the Square was demolished, but it was gone before construction of the power stations was completed.

I have no information at all on who it was that began to develop that area and in-particular the Square itself. All I know is that development began in 1794 with the construction of Cowpen Quay. I would imagine that the Square arrived after the building of the quay. Hopefully some of the locals like Michael Dixon will be able to enlighten us. It is a shame that what looks to be a pleasant little development of small buildings and the windmill was completely lost as the harbour and Bates site developed. All in the name of progress eh  :-\

Philip
Northumberland; Johnson, Johnston, Dodds, Rutherford, Gray, Kennedy, Wilson, Sanderson, Davidson and other Border Marauders as they are discovered on this journey.
Berkshire; Knight, Bristor, Sharpe, Sharp, Ashley.
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Midlands; Hodgetts, Parker, Easthope.

Offline Michael Dixon

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Re: Hodgson's Mill
« Reply #14 on: Tuesday 03 May 11 11:23 BST (UK) »

 In the 1870s the Newcastle Weekly Chronicle published a series of articles under the heading " Our Colliery Villages" a sort of travelogue on colliery life, history, housing, sanitation etc.

On 4th Oct 1873, the reporter covered Cowpen.

Some extracts mentioning Cowpen Square and its environs .....

" We last week attempted to show what Cowpen had been like as a colliery village in it's early days; this week we desire to present it to our readers as it is to be seen at present. "

 "Previous to the year 1864 Cowpen was but a a small village with little prospect of enlargement: but in that year an Act of Parliament was passed, which by setting free the land on the Thornto or Crofton estates, gave a mighty impetus to the enterprise of the district. It was then that Cowprn Quay was built, and what had previously been a vast waste of mud when the tide was low, or a broad expanse of shallow water when the tide was high, ( such as Jarrow Slake is now) was reclaimed by degrees from its useless state to become the site of a flourishing town. "

Reporter writes of the condition of cottages on Kneelman's Row ( today Regent St of Blyth)..
 " They were built at a time when sanitary arrangements were never dreamt of, and as a consequence we find at the back of the gardens behind the houses the usual offensive ash heaps."

" From hence we walk towards the Square, where we find everything in a state of confusion. AA revolution is going on amongst the old house which we last week described. nThey are falling before the pick of the labourer and in their are rising up modest mansions of dun-coloured brick with slated roofs, which put to utter confusion the antiquated shams which, with drooping chimneys and tottering walls, tremblingly await their gradual extinction"

" The ramshackle erections which used to fill up the centre of Cowpen Square have disappeared for ever: but the ugly open ashpits still remain, and it is to be hoped the hand of improvement will not be stayed till they also have disappeared to be replaced by the sanitary reforms of modern civilisation. "

" Outside the square is Cowpen Mill, its giant arms whirling round merrily to the piping of a stiff westerly gale"

"Long years ago there was another mill known as Buckshill Mill. which stood upon the centre of what is now known as  Monkey's Island. Not a vestige of it now remains but our venerable guide points to some stepping stones left bare by the receding tide which foot passengers used to cross when they went to the mill."


" Near the square is the ferry boat landing for the convenience of the good people of Cambois who depend on it as a means of communication with Blyth . A bridge across the river here would be of infinite service : and Monkey's Island offer an elligible foundation of one end of it; but the owner refuses to give up an inch of the land for such a purpose"

" .... we wend our way towards the North Pit, across the field over which the skirmishers of the 93rd, under the leadership of the late Lord Clyde ( who was then Colonel Campbell) spread themselves when they made their bloodless assault upon the square "

 Then reporter makes his way to the "A" pit ( also called South Pit, site now at "top" of Waterloo Rd) then to Isabella Pit.

~~~~~~~~----------


Old maps showing Cowpen Square...

Fryer's 1820 map
http://communities.northumberland.gov.uk/007179FS.htm
Square only three-sided

Greenwood's 1828 map
http://communities.northumberland.gov.uk/006972FS.htm
Square just south of Buckshill Mill.

1860 Ordnance  6" version
http://communities.northumberland.gov.uk/004890FS.htm

~~~~~~~~----------

On the 1841 census Cowpen Square follows on from "North Pit Houses" and Buck Hill Mill, page refs, from  821/4a 23-2 to 821/4a 31-18. Many of the residents are coal miners, and would likely have worked at the North Pit/ " A " pit ( later to become Bates Pit)


Michael
Names.

GALLAGHER ( + variations).
Areas. Co Sligo, Co Leitrim, Co Mayo. IRELAND.
Ontario, CANADA
Lowell, Ma, USA
Counties of Northumberland & Durham, ENGLAND
-------------------------------------------------------------------
MALEY/MELIA/MALLEY  - with or without " O "
Westport Co Mayo. Northumberland
-------------------------------------------------------------------
DIXON
Cumberland.. Brampton, Carlisle, ENGLAND

Census information is Crown Copyright. from www.nationalarchives.

Offline Michael Dixon

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Re: Hodgson's Mill
« Reply #15 on: Tuesday 03 May 11 14:04 BST (UK) »


 The Durham C.C.  GIS mapping website which allows sight of areas at different stages in their history...

 Cowpen Square is there at the start of historical sequence i.e. 18565-1865,  then up to 1951-59, but is not on map of 1960-69.

Michael
Names.

GALLAGHER ( + variations).
Areas. Co Sligo, Co Leitrim, Co Mayo. IRELAND.
Ontario, CANADA
Lowell, Ma, USA
Counties of Northumberland & Durham, ENGLAND
-------------------------------------------------------------------
MALEY/MELIA/MALLEY  - with or without " O "
Westport Co Mayo. Northumberland
-------------------------------------------------------------------
DIXON
Cumberland.. Brampton, Carlisle, ENGLAND

Census information is Crown Copyright. from www.nationalarchives.

Offline Gmac101

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Re: Hodgson's Mill
« Reply #16 on: Tuesday 03 May 11 22:49 BST (UK) »
I am related to the Hodgson’s who Hodgson’s Lane is named after.

I have traced them back to the early 1700’s when the family was based in and around Stannington Bridge  and Plessey.

 Richard Hodgson who was involved in the management of the pits at Plessey took out a lease with others for the development of the Cowpen Colliery in 1797, sometime shortly afterwards he bought land from the Croft Estate and built “Hodgson’s Mill” and house for him and his family.  He evidently also owned the Buckshill Mill, though that is not confirmed.

Hodgsons Mill was further developed by his son Joseph Hodgson who inherited the site in 1830. He built the quay wall you can see in the second drawing.

Joseph tried to rent the mills out in 1838 but was not successful.

In the 1850's he advertised a butchers shop and blacksmiths shop as being available for rent in the mills

Joseph’s 3rd son also a Joseph Hodgson founded the Shipyard in about 1860 with Rodger Soulsby.  Their firm Hodgson & Soulsby occupied the Crofton Mills site until they moved in 1863 to what had been the Bowmen and Drummond yard further down the river at Cowpen Quay.

Joseph senior's eldest son another Richard Hodgson inherited the mills in 1858, though he ran it before then as he advertised for a miller to work at the mill in 1855.

Richard Hodgson continued to run the mill and act as a flour dealer until 1868 when he tried to sell the mill and all it's contents along with his farm at  Cowpen North.

The mill lay abandoned for many years and was finally taken down in 1890.

The land and the quay were eventually sold by JC Hodgson, Richard's only son to the Blyth Harbour Commissioners in 1898 for £10,500.

I have gleaned most of this information from the History of the Port of Blyth by CE Baldwin, where the plans posted by PHodgetts come from, cuttings from the Newcastle Courant obtained from the Gale site and Volume 9 of the History of Northumberland.  J.C. Hodgson was on the writing committee and I suspect he stuck as much as he could about his family in there.

The map is from the history of Northumberland - no date given

Hope this is all interesting

Gavin



   

 

Offline kappm

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Re: Hodgson's Mill
« Reply #17 on: Wednesday 11 May 11 12:04 BST (UK) »
Many thanks for all the info about Cowpen Square.  I really appreciate it.

My [possible] ancestors who lived there were called Robert & Grace Davison, according to 1851 census.  I'm still verifying the link to my definite ancestor - so I'm not yet certain I've a connection.

Despite this, thanks again for your help.

Marco