Author Topic: 'Lost' grandfather in Montreal  (Read 15137 times)

Offline snikwahrm

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Re: 'Lost' grandfather in Montreal
« Reply #27 on: Tuesday 08 March 11 21:38 GMT (UK) »
Thank you, I reckon you are spot on!


Thank you enormously for that information - that could well explain my great grandfather's occupation as 'Examiner' & why there were so many other examiners who travelled with him to New York.  However, it does not tell me why he was in Sherbrooke.  I think I must also explore his first location of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, USA & seek clues there.


Your great Grandfather could also have being in Canada to give technical advice to local industries, or as an inspector to make sure that British standards are met.


War industries and Commerce
“Large scale military industries developed in Canada following its entry into the First World War.  Under the coordination of the Imperial Munitions Board, supplies from Canada flowed to Europe as industries, old and new, produced enormous quantities war material.  By 1917, some 600 factories were employing at least 150,000 workers, out of a population of over seven million, making everything from uniforms to submarines.  Ammunition was an especially important industry and nearly a third of all ammunition fired by Allied artillery during 1917 was Canadian made.”
Source: http://www.cmhg.gc.ca/html/gl-ga/index-eng.asp?letter=W&page=1&t=

The Sherbrooke Hussars and Les Fusiliers de Sherbrooke are local milita units and as such would not have any connection to your Great Grandfather’s work.

http://www.army.forces.gc.ca/sherh/qg-hq/historique-history-eng.aspx?action=view&id=intro

http://www.army.forces.gc.ca/35gbc/unites-units/fusdesher-eng.aspx



Offline chinakay

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Re: 'Lost' grandfather in Montreal
« Reply #28 on: Tuesday 08 March 11 22:14 GMT (UK) »
shipyard was in Montreal.  Perhaps in Sherbrooke?
  

Have you looked at a map? I don't think you're going to find many shipyards in Sherbrooke.

Don't think there are any left in Montreal either. But back then there was a big one run by the Dominion Bridge Company, as both ventures had to do with high-grade steel.

http://shipbuildinghistory.com/history/canada/united.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dominion_Bridge_Company

Cheers,
China
Moore/Paterson~Montreal
Moore/Addison~New Brunswick
Jubb/Kerr~Mirfield~Halifax~Moffatt
Williams~Dolwyddelan

King~Bedfordshire~Hull
Jenkins~Somerset
Sellers~Hull

Offline jmcgill

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Re: 'Lost' grandfather in Montreal
« Reply #29 on: Tuesday 08 March 11 22:28 GMT (UK) »


Offline snikwahrm

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Re: 'Lost' grandfather in Montreal
« Reply #30 on: Tuesday 08 March 11 22:45 GMT (UK) »
The Dominion Bridge Company again - I really do feel we are getting closer to an answer!  If they operated a shipyard & built a bridge in Sherbrooke, we maybe have the connection between my great grandfather's WW1 work & the bridge built by Henry Octavius Atkinson.  My mother said she thought that G-grandfather Allen & Henry O were friends first, 'drinking companions after work'.  But I could not see the connection between their work. & thought they simply met in the hotel they were both said to be staying in.  There was only about 8 years age difference; Henry was about 20 years older than his bride.

Now I must explore your links, thank you.

shipyard was in Montreal.  Perhaps in Sherbrooke?
  

Have you looked at a map? I don't think you're going to find many shipyards in Sherbrooke.

Don't think there are any left in Montreal either. But back then there was a big one run by the Dominion Bridge Company, as both ventures had to do with high-grade steel.

http://shipbuildinghistory.com/history/canada/united.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dominion_Bridge_Company

Cheers,
China

Offline jmcgill

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Re: 'Lost' grandfather in Montreal
« Reply #31 on: Wednesday 09 March 11 01:15 GMT (UK) »
Just in case you missed my earlier post with the link for Canadian Vickers.

http://shipbuildinghistory.com/history/canada/vickers.htm

And here is a link for the H-class subs build by C-V.

http://www.gwpda.org/naval/hclaspht.htm

Note that it looks like United Shipyards were only active during the Second World War building Liberty ships. 



Offline snikwahrm

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Re: 'Lost' grandfather in Montreal
« Reply #32 on: Wednesday 09 March 11 20:36 GMT (UK) »
Thank you very much indeed for those links: I am immensely grateful to all those who have responded to this thread.  I have learned more from these exchanges about what both my grandfather & great grandfather were doing during WW1 in Quebec, than I learned in 5 years of searching elsewhere.

There are still outstanding questions, but I now have so many avenues to explore!  Many thanks to you all.

Offline mybabylu9

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Re: 'Lost' grandfather in Montreal
« Reply #33 on: Wednesday 09 March 11 22:26 GMT (UK) »
Sadly I do not think this Allen family is connected to mine.  My maternal great grandfather was with the Royal Navy (I have obtained his service records) until shortly before travelling from Liverpool to New York in January 1915, with others working for Woolwich Arsenal, (then Kent, now South London) occupation shown as Examiner; their passages were paid by the British government.  His destination was Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.   His wife & my grandmother, his daughter followed in June 1915.  Great grandfather & his wife returned to England in December 1918, so I assume his work was complete.  Does anyone know if there was an army or armaments base, during WW1 in Sherbrooke, to explain his presence there?

Hi.  I was really interested to read the above.  I believe my husband's grandfather Thomas was one of the "others" working for the Woolwich Arsenal who travelled to the USA in January 1915.  I have been trying for years to find out why the British Govt would have paid to send much needed workers during WW1 to USA.  Have tried Arsenal Historical Society with no joy - one day I may have to have an overnight stay in Kew and check the multitude of boxes that hold information on the Arsenal!  My husband's grandmother and father travelled over almost a year later and met Thomas in Waterinbury, Conneticut so sounds like none of them stayed in South Bethlehem for long.  I know the family stayed with othe relatives who had previously emeigrated to the USA in Lima, Ohio.  They also went to New Jersey and Niagara and lived for some time in Buffalo where sadly Thomas died.  His wife and young son then retuned to the UK in 1919.  I do have some photos taken in USA that have other people not known to me - I will try to dig them out and post them at some point.  Your's has been the only link to the other people who travelled over that I have ever found!  The list of men can be found on Ellis Island website.  Best wishes.