Author Topic: stonemasons  (Read 5995 times)

Offline deebel

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Re: stonemasons
« Reply #9 on: Tuesday 19 April 11 20:24 BST (UK) »
As a stonemason you must be able to:

* estimate the quantity of materials required by measuring surfaces or reviewing a work order;
* interpret drawings and blueprints and calculate the materials required;
* measure from an established starting point and construct corners first, using a plumb line and mason's level to ensure each layer will be level from corner to corner;
* cut and shape stones or other masonry materials using machine or hand tools, taking into account the characteristics of the stone being used;
* cut and polish granite and marble for use in construction, such as kitchen bench tops ;
* design, cut and carve monumental masonry, such as memorial tablets and bases for statues, using templates for detailed work and a variety of chisels, punches and hammers depending on the type of stone being used;
* cut lettering into stonework by marking out the letters, and then cutting or chiselling them with hand-held tools or sandblasting equipment;
* construct walls using stone slabs and large masonry slab blocks;
* lay stone paving, granite or marble floor tiles;
* fix stone facades to buildings;
* repair and replace stonework on old buildings, churches and monuments;
* remove excess fixing agents after the masonry material is in position;
* use a hammer and chisel or masonry saw to cut stone to fit, as required.
I would say a proper Stone Mason is a pretty skilled individual. If you had that skill then I would reckon you would be pretty clued up in the method of road building or doing most things with stone however most ordinary people would not reasonably assume that a person described as a stone cutter would be involved in carving etc or realising a concept  ( IMO)

Stonemasons Guild is probably one of the oldest.
This post is a natural hand made product. The slight variations in spelling and grammar enhance its individual character and beauty and in no way are to be considered flaws.

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Offline Billyblue

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Re: stonemasons
« Reply #10 on: Wednesday 20 April 11 03:20 BST (UK) »
I'm with t'mo! 

Deebel covers it all fairly completely.

I know my stonemasons were certainly skilled - must have been for their work to be still standing over 150 years later!

Dawn M
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Offline Delver

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Re: stonemasons
« Reply #11 on: Wednesday 20 April 11 15:49 BST (UK) »
This made us smile. A branch of my ancestors were stonemasons.  We were in a Cotswold churchyard looking at gravestones and found some of the family in question - all still in readable condition - whilst all those around were so pitted and worn as to be indecipherable. Can't you just imagine them saying "let's have a nice bit of stone for our so and so...?"
Pettifer - Gloucestershire, Oxfordshire, Warwickshire
Walker and Warner - Warwickshire
Moore - Worcestershire
Carveley - Cambridgeshire

Offline Johnsonsyard

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Re: stonemasons
« Reply #12 on: Wednesday 20 April 11 19:59 BST (UK) »
Some stimulating discussions , but from what I know about my ancestors Deebel's contribution seems to be the best fit. It is recorded that work was done on the Hall belonging to the Squire in 1734 and they were involved in the building of the mill. I have also seen stone carved initials ( quite beautiful)of my ancestors in the garden of the house where they once lived. many thanks everyone , I have enjoyed following this thread.

Offline mandyandleggs

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Re: stonemasons
« Reply #13 on: Friday 24 June 11 09:39 BST (UK) »
I have been told by my father, (whose father was a stonemason) that he used to engrave the words on to grave stones. In the local cemetry where I come from my grandads business name is on alot of grave stones.

Also he was in with the Free Masons, my dad was only young, so not really known what that was properly. I was told they are a group of people who put money together for things? not sure can anyone tell me more??

Offline Witters of Halsall

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Re: stonemasons
« Reply #14 on: Thursday 12 April 18 04:06 BST (UK) »
Thomas Witter of Wrightington, Lancashire was born about 1720. He was a stonemason. His father was also Thomas and also a stonemason. I know it is a long shot, but does anyone know aboiut this location?

Online Maiden Stone

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Re: stonemasons
« Reply #15 on: Thursday 12 April 18 17:53 BST (UK) »
Is it Wrightington near Chorley? I know that quarrying was the industry in Whittle-le-Woods, north of Chorley. Stone was transported by canal to Wigan.
I'm also from a long line of stonemasons, (early 18th-late 19thC), originating further north in the county - Cockerham, Forton, Garstang, Lancaster. One moved to Longridge and one of his sons moved to Preston. Longridge has the oldest row of houses built by a building society. Longridge quarries provided stone for Preston. The Preston stonemason's grandson eventually became a contractor when brick took over from stone. The stonemason ancestor born early 18thC had a long life, qualified to vote as a freeholder, could read & write and left around 100 in his will. His son, grandsons and g. grandsons were not as fortunate, less educated and many died before they were 50, some aged in their 20s & 30s.
Canal and railways were crucial in development of the industry.

Offline Irene pilgrim

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Re: stonemasons
« Reply #16 on: Sunday 23 September 18 10:45 BST (UK) »
Enjoyed this feed

Offline Mart 'n' Al

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Re: stonemasons
« Reply #17 on: Sunday 23 September 18 12:01 BST (UK) »
My ancestors did 7 year apprenticeships to be stonemasons. One was a frequent witness to the marriage of others, so I wonder if he was often called in from working on the church, or headstones.

Martin
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My ancestors are probably turning in their graves, not that I can actually find any of them.