Author Topic: Bricklayer in London in 1800's  (Read 15932 times)

Offline Hampshire Lass

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Re: Bricklayer in London in 1800's
« Reply #9 on: Saturday 16 April 11 11:59 BST (UK) »
Thanks Nick - what a truly fantastic photograph - I have very few of my ancestors.

Thanks for the information also.
My 3x great grandfather died in 1851 at the age of 53. The censuses just say bricklayer, so I don't know if he was a master bricklayer.
For some reason I've never sent for his death certificate but am going to today as he may well have died from a disease related to his trade.
He had moved to London from Wareham in Dorset by the time of his marriage in 1826 and there is reference on one website to others with the same surname working in the clay industry on the Isle of Purbeck. I haven't yet found their connection with my family.

I also completely forgot that another ancestor was a journeyman bricklayer and have never known what that meant.

Thanks Stan - that link to the census information was very interesting. There certainly were a lot of bricklayers in London at that time. My GGG Grandfather being one of them.
Best wishes HL


Census information is crown copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline stanmapstone

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Re: Bricklayer in London in 1800's
« Reply #10 on: Saturday 16 April 11 12:04 BST (UK) »
Clergymen called Bricklayers.
This appears to be the original source of the subject;
Notes and Queries Vol. 6 2nd S. (156) Dec 25 1858 Page 528 http://www.rootschat.com/links/0cse/
Clergy called Bricklayers. Can any of your readers inform me of the origin of the word "bricklayer" used for "clergyman" in the counties of Oxon and Berks? Has it any connexion with St. Paul's phrase "a wise master-builder" &c.?

There were two replies Vol. 7 2nd S. (158) Jan 8 1859 Page 38, http://www.rootschat.com/links/0csc/
and Vol. 7 2nd S. (162) Feb 5 1859 Page 115 http://www.rootschat.com/links/0csd/


Stan
Census Information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline pinefamily

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Re: Bricklayer in London in 1800's
« Reply #11 on: Saturday 16 April 11 23:54 BST (UK) »
Stan,
You never cease to amaze me with your depth of knowledge on unusual or rare topics. I always take an interest in these things myself, but hats off to you. :)

Darren
I am Australian, from all the lands I come (my ancestors, at least!)

Pine/Pyne, Dowdeswell, Kempster, Sando/Sandoe/Sandow, Nancarrow, Carrington, Hounslow, Youatt, Richardson, Jarmyn, Oxlade, Coad, Bentham, Holloway, Lindner, Pittaway, and too many others to name.
Devon, Dorset, Gloucs, Cornwall, Yorks, Bucks, Oxfordshire, Wilts, Germany, Sweden, and of course London, to name a few.


Offline HeatherLynne

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Re: Bricklayer in London in 1800's
« Reply #12 on: Sunday 17 April 11 00:20 BST (UK) »
I guess construction of both underground train tunnels and the sewerage system would have required many bricklayers, perhaps even more than the obvious brick buildings above ground. 

Heather
Rassell - South Hayling/Portsea/Chelsea,  Hellyer - Totnes/Islington,  Roots - Hackney,  Edden - St Pancras

Offline pinefamily

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Re: Bricklayer in London in 1800's
« Reply #13 on: Sunday 17 April 11 02:43 BST (UK) »
Most of which projects took place after this particular ancestor died unfortunately. But I like your thinking, Heather.
I am Australian, from all the lands I come (my ancestors, at least!)

Pine/Pyne, Dowdeswell, Kempster, Sando/Sandoe/Sandow, Nancarrow, Carrington, Hounslow, Youatt, Richardson, Jarmyn, Oxlade, Coad, Bentham, Holloway, Lindner, Pittaway, and too many others to name.
Devon, Dorset, Gloucs, Cornwall, Yorks, Bucks, Oxfordshire, Wilts, Germany, Sweden, and of course London, to name a few.

Offline Hampshire Lass

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Re: Bricklayer in London in 1800's
« Reply #14 on: Sunday 17 April 11 08:59 BST (UK) »
Stan,
You never cease to amaze me with your depth of knowledge on unusual or rare topics. I always take an interest in these things myself, but hats off to you. :)

Darren


I agree Darren,

Actually does anyone know what buildings would have been built from 1820-1850 in London? I also had thought of sewers and bridges but was obviously wrong there.

The family lived in Upper Garden Street, Westminster and on a map site somewhere once I found there was a sewer running along behind thier houses. I believe it was an open one - but I may be wrong as I am a bit hit and miss with my information at times :)
Best wishes HL


Census information is crown copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline Nick29

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Re: Bricklayer in London in 1800's
« Reply #15 on: Sunday 17 April 11 11:37 BST (UK) »
I think the railways drove most of the construction in and around London.  Not only did the construction of the railways themselves require a lot of bricklayers to build stations and bridges, they drew people into the cities, who themselves required places to live.  One of the largest brick-built buildings in London from the period was Kings Cross Station, which required hundreds of bricklayers to complete it.  It opened in October 1852.  I would like to think that my grandfather was involved in that masterpiece, but alas I have no idea which buildings he was involved with.
RIP 1949-10th January 2013

Best Wishes,  Nick.

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Offline Hampshire Lass

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Re: Bricklayer in London in 1800's
« Reply #16 on: Sunday 17 April 11 15:05 BST (UK) »
Ah, thanks Nick, I thought buildings was more of a man thing - I had no idea what was built when!

Perhaps our building ancestors worked together on London's buildings :)
Best wishes HL


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Offline pinefamily

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Re: Bricklayer in London in 1800's
« Reply #17 on: Monday 18 April 11 11:59 BST (UK) »
Reading these last few posts, gave me impetus to search a bit.
Big Ben was finished in 1858, but may have been started in your ancestor's lifetime.
The Houses of Parliament were re-built after a fire in 1834.
Trafalgar Square was finished in 1845.
The Royal Exchange was re-built after a fire in 1838.
I guess this is only scratching the surface.....
I am Australian, from all the lands I come (my ancestors, at least!)

Pine/Pyne, Dowdeswell, Kempster, Sando/Sandoe/Sandow, Nancarrow, Carrington, Hounslow, Youatt, Richardson, Jarmyn, Oxlade, Coad, Bentham, Holloway, Lindner, Pittaway, and too many others to name.
Devon, Dorset, Gloucs, Cornwall, Yorks, Bucks, Oxfordshire, Wilts, Germany, Sweden, and of course London, to name a few.