Author Topic: Nairn coat of arms  (Read 2384 times)

Offline clontarf

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Re: Nairn coat of arms
« Reply #18 on: Wednesday 10 October 18 04:55 BST (UK) »
I have a baptism for Richard of 20 Oct 1664 - from the Wingham bishops transcripts.  I shall be most interested if you have a second source for this date.  When I viewed the transcripts in 1995, I had a note that the original registers were still with the incumbent.  I dont know whether that situation has changed - I would really like to see them to check on a few names I had trouble reading.

No, I dont have a  will for Henry Lawson.

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Offline WillowG

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Re: Nairn coat of arms
« Reply #19 on: Wednesday 10 October 18 17:13 BST (UK) »
I have a baptism for Richard of 20 Oct 1664 - from the Wingham bishops transcripts.  I shall be most interested if you have a second source for this date.  When I viewed the transcripts in 1995, I had a note that the original registers were still with the incumbent.  I dont know whether that situation has changed - I would really like to see them to check on a few names I had trouble reading.

No, I dont have a  will for Henry Lawson.

I clearly must have that date from somewhere :)

I checked Ancestry and FamilySearch and those records have yet to show up there, as far as I could see.

Extensive googling has unfortunately not led me back to where I could have found it. It is probably some obscure volume printed for ten people that I found using precisely the right archaic spelling of the last name combined with exactly the right search phrase ...

I will let you know should I ever come across it again :)

No, I dont have a will for Henry Lawson.

Let me know if you ever find it :) I was never able to, but I found the information I sought in other sources eventually.

If you are right about the David Nairn who married Hannah Gibbs in Ramsgate 1754 and the William Nairn of Ickham who married Ann Rayner of Wingham in 1719 being relations of Richard Nairn, maltser (1664-1755), there is a good chance of one of their descendants being mentioned in that will :)

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Offline clontarf

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Re: Nairn coat of arms
« Reply #20 on: Saturday 13 October 18 10:37 BST (UK) »
The eldest daughter of Richard Nairn/Nearne (b. 1664) maltster was Mary.   She may be the Mary Nearne spinster of St Margarets Canterbury who married by licence dated 1 Feb 1709 Thomas Lawson husbandsman, bachelor also of St Margarets (ref. Cowper, Canterbury Marriage Licences).  Familysearch shows a marriage between JOHN Lawson and Mary in 1709.  I have not yet checked the original documents for either record.

This supposition is strengthened by a court case in Bermuda where Sarah Nairn, third daughter of Richard, refers to her "sister Lawson" (thank you to Kerry for pointing me in this direction).  Richard's eldest son John was also in Bermuda in the 1720s and his son John is the Rev John Nairn (1727 - 1806) of Kingston.  Richard's second son Rev. William Nairn was in Bermuda and Virginia about 1726 to 1728 having inherited some shares in a free school there that were left in the will of Sir Nathaniel Rich in 1635.  I have yet to trace the succession that led to the shares being with William Nairn.

There is no will for Samuel Lawson in the PCC or Consistory or Archdeaconry Courts of Canterbury.  Is it possible he may also have gone to Bermuda?  I am currently working my way through the Bermuda wills looking for any Nairn wills or Thomas Lawson's will.

Offline WillowG

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Re: Nairn coat of arms
« Reply #21 on: Sunday 14 October 18 18:39 BST (UK) »
Henry Lawson left bequests to 139 people in his will, most, if not all of them, his cousins :) If any of the descendents of David Nairn and Hannah Gibbs and/or the descendans of William Nairn and Ann Rayner made any kind of favourable impression on him, there are good chances they are mentioned in that will if they are indeed relations :)

Offline clontarf

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Re: Nairn coat of arms
« Reply #22 on: Monday 15 October 18 00:42 BST (UK) »
I think I meant Henry, not Samuel!  I thought it was remarkable Fasham Nairn's will mentioned 53 people, but 139 must be some sort of a record!

I have now checked the original records for the Lawson/Nearne marriage 2 Feb 1709/10 (old style dates).  The licence, which is in Latin, has "Thomam Lawson Agricolam" (FHL film 8309434) and the marriage register "John Lawson" (FHL film 4021505). Who knows which is correct.  Neither document shows a signature.

Richard Nearne the maltster died before August 1755.  The Archdeacons transcripts for Barham (FHL 4021532) say Mrs Frances Nairn was a widow.  The original registers have now been filmed (as have Wingham's) but are only available on microfilm, not as digital images.

Offline Spes Ultra

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Re: Nairn coat of arms
« Reply #23 on: Thursday 06 December 18 15:44 GMT (UK) »
Dear all,

I was intrigued by the view in Clontarf's post that "all NAIRN(E)/NEARN(E)s in Kent are descended from a David Nairn, sometime curate of Paddlesworth and Swingfield" . I think I agree.

Presumably he was the David Nearne who was married to Mary Chapeman; and who witnessed an assize bill in 1651 under which Thomas Soames of Lyminge, a labourer, was convicted of bigamy (having initially married in Paddlesworth) and was subsequently hanged.

Does anyone have a date and / or place of birth for David Nearne?
Presumably he was father to the David Nearne born in Swingfield in 1634?
And the brother to the Richard Nearne who married Mary Mariner in Eastbourne in 1629?

Most of all, I'd love to know how the Nairns/ Nairnes /Nearnes ended up in Kent when the surname has such strong Scottish roots.

Scottish-educated clergymen did sometimes come to English parishes in the early Stuart period (for example - Davidus Naren, MA from St Salvator’s College, St Andrews; Appointed vicar of Darton, Yorkshire 25 May 1626 and who died 9 March 1628).

Any additional insight into the very early Kent / Sussex Nairnes gratefully received.






Offline clontarf

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Re: Nairn coat of arms
« Reply #24 on: Friday 07 December 18 06:46 GMT (UK) »
Hi Spes Ultra

According to the Clergy of the Church of England database (db.theclergydatabase.org.uk), David Nairn was ordained deacon on 15 Apr 1622 at Canterbury, with a qualification of MA.  Assuming he has been 4-5 years at University for the MA and entered University at age 16 to 18, then he would have been born about 1600-02.  I have not found him in the published records of Oxford or Cambridge universities, so he may have attended a Scottish university.

He was curate at Swingfield 1626-65, and curate at Paddlesworth 1630-65.

He married Mary Chapman on 25 Apr 1627 at Acrise.  She may be buried as Mrs Nairn on 21 Aug 1663 at Wingham.

I believe their children were:

George, yeoman of Wingham, baptised 21 Feb 1627/28 at Elham; mentions his brothers Richard David and William in his will made in 1676; also mentions several cousins and nephews named Fagg - presumably on his mother's side of the family (no luck yet in tracing the connection);
Richard, miller of Wingham, bapt 1 Feb 1629/30 at Swingfield;
Agnes, bapt 8 Mar 1631/32 at Swingfield;
David, bapt 28 Aug 1634 at Swingfield "son of David Nairne and Mary Chapman";
William, brewer of Wingham, bapt 21 Dec 1737 at Swingfield;
Mary, married 10 Dec 1662 at Paddlesworth, buried 1 Mar 1694 at Paddlesworth;
Joannah, buried 14 Nov 1663 Swingfield.

As curate of Swingfield and Paddlesworth he is bondsman for four marriages 1634-42, testifying to the consent of the bride's father in one.

All these records from the Bishops Transcripts which have a gap 1642 to 1662, in which I presume the births of Mary and Joannah occurred.  My chart has for years had another daughter Ellen died in 1661 at Swingfield, but I cant now find my notes for this event, but if true her birth probably also occurred in the gap.  I dont know if the original registers have any events recorded in the gap.  They have now been filmed, but are not readily accessible through familysearch.

There is another Nairn clergyman in Kent at this time who did come from Scotland - Rev. James Nairne vicar of the Isle of Grain from 1669 to his death there in 1677.  His will leaves legacies to his mother Dorothy, citizen of St Andrews, his brother Alexander, also of St Andrews, his aunt Frances [Vigion] of London, and kinswoman Thomasin Tredwin, also of London.  I think James may have been born 1642 at St Andrews to James Nairne and Dorothy Quarles.  His MA is recorded at Oxford in 1668 "incorp. St Andrews".  I presume this means he started university at St Andrews and either transferred, or completed his BA at St Andrews and then did his MA at Oxford.  He died relatively young and does not appear to have married or had children.  I can find no connection to the other Nairns in Kent.  The same Christian names recur again and again in the (presumed) descendants of Rev. David Nairn, but not one Alexander as a far as I know.

I did not know about the 1629 marriage for a Richard Nearne at Eastbourne.  Do you have a reference?

As to how the Nairns ended up in Kent, I presume some Scots saw opportunities in the accession of James VI to the throne of England in 1603.  It would help to know who had the patronage of the livings at Swingfield and Paddlesworth.  British History Online suggests for Swingfield - maybe Sir T. Palmer, bart.; and Paddlesworth was a chapelry of Snodland which was under the patronage of the Bishop of Rochester with possible connections to the Palmer family. 

Offline clontarf

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Re: Nairn coat of arms
« Reply #25 on: Friday 07 December 18 07:29 GMT (UK) »
Apropos the Palmer connection:

George Nearn in his will 1676 gives "unto the Right Worthy Sir Henry Palmer of Wingham aforesaid and baronett and to the honoured Lady his wife to each of them a Ring to the value of 20 shillings"

Offline Spes Ultra

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Re: Nairn coat of arms
« Reply #26 on: Friday 07 December 18 13:51 GMT (UK) »
Hi Clontarf

Thanks for that comprehensive summary of David Narne, the curate of Swingham and Padsworth (and also the information on Rev. James Nairn of Isle of Grain) . I like the hypothesis  that David the curate may have been one of the many Scots who saw opportunities in moving south during the reign of King James. It would nevertheless be great to find some compelling evidence to support this.

(A relevant example of the Scots who benefited from the accession of King James is Alexander Nairne (of the Sandford family).  Initially "brinder" to the king, later chamberlain to the queen and surveyor of the king's castles and forts, married in London, raised a family around Farnham in Surrey, traded shares in the East India Company and then obtained a crown charter for land back in Scotland in the 1630s. )

You specifically asked about Richard Nairn who married in Sussex in 1629. I only have what I found on Family Search:
Richard Nairn, 20 June 1629  married Mary Mariner,  Eastbourne, Sussex
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2QW-7VYB

There is a reference to another David Narne in Jacobean England that might be worth looking into in an effort to shine some light on the origins of David the curate:

Euphame Narne, daughter of David Narne,  married David Young, at St Dunstan's in Stepney Middlesex on10 September 1622
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NJ8D-39K

I also still wonder if there could be some familial link between David the curate and Davidus Naren, vicar of Dalton, Yorks (died 1628)
http://db.theclergydatabase.org.uk/jsp/persons/CreatePersonFrames.jsp?PersonID=111262